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This chart shows each committee, what was authorized, the amount of expenditures and the balances available.

Mr. ANDRÉWs. All of these special and select committees were authorized by law or House resolution?

Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir.
Mr. ANDREWS. Proceed.

Mr. JENNINGS. For the fiscal year 1966, $4,600,000 was appropriated or made available and $4,156,535 was expended; for the fiscal year 1967, $4,690,000 was appropriated or made available and $4,250,407 was expended; for the fiscal year 1968, $4,690,000 was appropriated or made available and through February 29, $2,865,282 was expended. We are requesting, for the fiscal year 1969, $1,865,000 compared with $1,690,000 appropriated for 1968 or an increase of $175,500.

Of the $4,690,000 appropriated for 1968, we have expended $2,865,282 through February 29, leaving a balance of $1,824,718. This figure, of course, does not take into consideration expenses or obligations that these various committees have incurred prior to March 1, 1968, and which have not yet been submitted for payment.

Mr. ANDREWS. Your regular appropriation, as you pointed out, for 1968 is $4,690,000. What is the pending pay supplemental ?

Mr. JENNINGS. For the special and select committees, $131,625.

Mr. ANDREWS. If you get that amount in the supplemental, will you have a balance in this account at the end of the year?

Mr. JENNINGS. I have no way of knowing.

NEED FOR INCREASE

Mr. ANDREWS. Is the increase requested more or less solely for the innualization of the pay increase last fall or are there increased auhorizations other than for pay that you have to reckon with?

Mr. JENNINGS. There are some of both.

Mr. ANDREWS. What are the total authorizations for the 90th Congress, both sessions?

Mr. JENNINGs. I am not sure I can get the appropriations on a sesion basis because these appropriations are made on the year basis f the session.

COMPARISON OF TOTAL AUTHORIZATIONS Mr. ANDREWS. Give us the total authorizations for the record, going ack several years.

Mr. JENNINGS. In the first session of the 90th Congress as a matter f comparison, it was $4,948,000. Mr. ANDREWS. Authorization ? Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, $4,948,000. In the second session we have had 1.565,400. We show actually a decrease of $383,000.

Since March 1, 1968, additional authorizations have been made to the overnment Operations Committee of $550,000; Science and Astroautics, $300,000; Un-American Activities, $375,000, or a total of 1.225,000.

The authorization for other congressional years, going back to 1963 or the first session of the 88th Congress, was $3,443,950. The second ssion 1964, 88th Congress, was $4,668,349.62.

For the first session of the 89th Congress, 1965, $4,677,250. The second session, 1966, of the 89th, authorized $4,472,000.

In 1967 the first session of 90th Congress, $4,948,000, and in the second sesion of the 90th Congress 1968, it is $4,565,400, including the three that have been authorized since March 1.

NUMBER OF "SPECIAL AND SELECT" EMPLOYEES Mr. ANDREWS. How many employees are carried at some recent date on the special and select committee rolls and how does that colpare with say a year earlier ?

Mr. JENNINGS. As of March 31, there were 308 employees. That compares to 268 in 1967, the same date, compares to 305 in 1966, and 255 in 1965.

Mr. ANDREWS. What was the latest?
Mr. JENNINGS. 308.
Mr. Andrews. It has gone from 255 in 1965, to 308 in 1968?
Mr. JENNINGS. That is correct.

Mr. ANDREWS. Any questions, Mr. Langen, special and select committees?

Mr. LANGEN. I do not believe so.

COORDINATOR OF INFORMATION
Mr. ANDREWS. Next is the coordinator of information.
Mr. JENNINGS. We are not making a request there.

Mr. ANDREWS. We appropriated to liquidate this office, $35,000 How much was actually used ?

Mr. JENNINGS. Out of the $35,000, we have $1,479.22.
Mr. ANDREWS. Will that revert to the Treasury?
Mr. JENNINGS. Yes.
Mr. ANDREWS. Any questions, Mr. Langen?
Mr. LANGEN. No questions.
Mr. JENNINGS. There will be a $35,000 savings there this year.
(Off the record.)
Mr. ANDREWS. Proceed, Mr. Clark.

TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE SERVICES Mr. JENNINGS. For the fiscal year 1969, we estimate $4,032,0. This is the same as appropriated for 1968.

Through February 29, 1968, we have expended $1,259,872, leaving a balance of $2,772,128. However, the bills we have paid are mostly only through December and therefore we will have to disburse for 6 more months through June 30, plus any pickup bills that may be rendered for service later.

1966

1967

1968 * Feb. 23

Appropriation...
Expenditure...
i Balance available.--...----

........$2.880,000.00 $3, 330, 000.00
---............. ,

2.312, 218.52 2,774.090.18 .......... 567,781, 48 555,909. &

$4,032.

1.25 2.7701

Mr. ANDREWS, I wish you would insert in the record at this point he Clerk's note on page 46 and the special note with reference to House Resolution 161 of May 11, 1967.

(The note follows:) CLERK'S NOTE.—Under terms of House Resolution 901, agreed to June 29, 1966, vhich was made permanent law by Public Law 89–697, the allowance provisions or official long-distance telephone, telegraph, radiograms, and cablegrams, was asically set at 70,000 "units” per session, with provision for carryover of unused nits up to not to exceed 140,000 units at the end of the session. Moreover, should

Member exhaust the allowance before the end of a session, unpaid bills for elephone and telegraph service may, according to application of the law, be rought forward to the next succeeding session or term and charged to units vailable under the new session or term. (For telephone, one word equals four nits; others, one word equals one unit, except that when night telegram service I used, the "unit charge" is one-half unit per word.

The five leaders (Speaker, and majority and minority Leaders and majority nd minority whips) have unlimited official allowances for this purpose. SPECIAL NOTE.--House Resolution 161, of May 11, 1967 (but effective January 3, 167), provides for reimbursement for official telephone services outside the istrict of Columbia of not to exceed $300 per quarter (not to exceed $1,200 year). But this is currently paid from "Miscellaneous items," not from 'elegraph and telephone.”

UNEXPENDED BALANCE

Mr. ANDREWS. Here again you show no increase requested, but you vre an unexpended balance in excess of half a million dollars in each the last 2 years. What is the outlook for this year? Why should we continue to apopriate that amount? VÍr. JENNINGS. This is what we have been discussing in many of pse things. We really do not know how much is going to come in. Mr. ANDREWS. Out of the appropriation in 1966, you had a lance available or unexpended of $507,781.48, and in 1967 you had 13,909.82. Mr. JENNINGS. You realize that they can carry these over from one sion of Congress to the other. Ir. ANDREWS. But not from one Congress to the next? Ir. JENNINGS. Yes. Ir. ANDREWS. They can? Ir. LIVINGSTON. Not to exceed 140,000 units. This is what is so coning about trying to appropriate for this type of thing. Ir. JENNINGS. It indicates we have more and more people that are ig more and more telephone units, and since they are interchange• now between the telephone and telegraph and since they are ied over from session to session and Congress to Congress, we ly do not know but we do know that we have 25 members that have eded their unit allowance for 1967 that had this not been the law · would have had to be cut off and had to pay for their 1967 rances. r. ANDREWS. The way the law operates, if I understand it, is a member is entitled to so many units. r. JENNINGS. Yes. r. ANDREWS. If he does not use all of his units in the first session of Oth Congress, for example, the balance carriers over to the second on of the 90th Congress?

Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir. Mr. ANDREWS. If at the end of the 90th Congress he has units ava: able, those unused units carry over into the 91st Congress?

Mr. JENNINGS. Right, not to exceed 140,000 units.

Mr. ANDREWS. If a man leaves the 90th Congress for reasons will not discuss and he has a balance remaining, it dies with !. term of service; is that right?

Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir; that is right. But by the same token, shoa. he have any remaining balance to be collected, then we attempt collect that balance because it cannot be carried over because he doen not have any allowance to charge it to.

(Off the record.)
Nr. ANDREWS. Proceed, please.

STATIONERY REVOLVING FUND

Mr. JENNINGS. For stationery, an allowance for each Representatit and the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, for the first se sion of the 91st Congress, $1,308,000, to remain available until espended. This is the same as appropriated for 1968.

Mr. ANDREW. Is the stationery room doing more business erer year, and how much?

Mr. JENNINGS. It is going considerably more business. They are ding well over $100,000 of business a month over there.

EARNINGS OF STATIONERY ROOM Mr. ANDREWS. Are they making any profit? Mr. JENNINGS. It is operated on a revolving fund. As a matter : fact, if it were not for the discount we are able to take advantage : and to cover up for the breakage we would actually have a loss.

Mr. ANDREWS. You are having no loss?

Mr. JENNINGS. Here again, we found it necessary to ask for so administrative procedures to be followed over there because we on: have the moneys that are appropirated to the individual members that we might operate from and there are so many members that os more than their allowance that we had to ask them to replenish thes account when it was overdrawn.

Mr. ANDREWS. Recite the profit or loss in the last 3 or 4 years. cluding the current year. You can put that in the record if you do " have the figure now. (The information follows:)

Stationery Room net income 1964

-----------------1965 1966

1967

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

Mr. ANDREWS. How many employees work in the stationery for Mr. JENNINGS. They are all included under the personnel of Clerk's Office. If you refer back to page 11 of the committee you have 25 employees.

Mr. ANDREWS. Do you have an unexpended balance in this account?

Mr. JENNINGS. No, sir, except the colloquy we have carried on here that would remain available. Mr. ANDREWS. Any questions about the stationery fund ! Mr. LANGEN. No questions. Mr. ANDREWS. Proceed.

POSTAGE STAMPS Mr. JENNINGS. For airmail and special delivery postage stamp allowances for the first session of the 91st Congress for the official use of each Member and the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, each standing committee of the House, the Speaker, the majority and minority leaders, the majority and minority whips, and officers of the House, as authorized by law, $320,390; compared with $228,550 appropriated for 1968, or an increase of $91,840.

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This is the amount authorized by House Resolution 1003.
Mr. ANDREWS. Of December 14, 1967?
Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir.
Mr. ANDREWS. What does the resolution provide?"
Mr. JENNINGS. A copy is supplied for the record here.
Mr. ANDREWS. Put it in the record at this point.
Mr. JENNINGS. Yes.
(The information follows:)

H. Res. 1003 IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, U.S., DECEMBER 14, 1967 Resolved, That effective January 3, 1968, (a) in addition to postage stamps authorized to be furnished under any other provision of law, until otherwise provided by law, the Clerk of the House of Representatives shall procure and fur. nish United States airmail and special delivery postage stamps (1) to each Representative and the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico serving as such on and after the date of adoption of this resolution, in an amount not exceeding $200 and (2) to each standing committee of the House of Representatives, upon request of the chairman thereof, in an amount not exceeding $120.

(b) In addition to postage stamps authorized under any other provision of law, unless otherwise provided by law, the Speaker, the majority and minority leaders, and the majority and minority whips of the House of Representatives shall each be allowed United States airmail and special delivery postage stamps in an amount not exceeding $180, and the following officers of the House of Representatives shall each be allowed such stamps in the amounts herein specified as follows: The Clerk of the House, $320; the Sergeant at Arms, $240; the Doorkeeper, $200; and the Postmaster, $160.

(c) There shall be paid out of the contingent fund of the House of Representatives such sums as may be necessary to carry out this resolution. Attest:

Clerk. Mr. ANDREWS. What it did, if I remember correctly, is increase the amount of postage stamps allocated to each member.

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