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Mr. HARRISON. Just computer-type work. There are so many jobs in the Government where the information is already in the computers which they would like to have printed but they cannot afford the cost. Now they can give us on tape what they want printed and we program the format we want, put it on the computer, then on the Linotron and produce page negatives at very little cost.

Mr. ANDREWS. Have you told us how a saving of $320,000 was made!
Mr. HARRISON. It did not require any keyboarding.
Mr. ANDREWS. The saving was in labor?

Mr. HARRISON. In labor, and reduction of bulk, reduction in the number of plates required, reduction in the number of presses required, and the amount of paper required. So across the board there was a tremendous saving.

Mr. ANDREWS. Can you think of any other type of work this machine might do in the future other than computer type ?

Mr. HARRISON. Anything we do on this machine has to come from a magnetic tape. The computer gives us a magnetic tape. This machine cannot be used in any other type work, but with the 3,000 computers now in Government use, there is enough work to keep the two machines we will have busy 24 hours a day. I do not know how long we will be able to handle the material with the two Linotrons.

Mr. ANDREWS. Can you tell us anything else about the machine? How does it work after you get the tape out of the machine?

Mr. HARRISON. After the film is exposed, it goes into a cassette until we have the number of pages we want. I think it can hold 500 pages. This goes to a darkroom and is run through a developing process which gives you a negative rather than a positive. Then it goes to the plate room for burning onto a plate and then it goes to the

offset press. Mr. ANDREWS. You have been talking in technical language which to a layman does not mean too much. What you are telling us is that this new machine will enable you to do a certain amount of work that the Government Printing Office is required to do by Government agencies in connection with transposing computer film

Mr. HARRISON, Computer tape.

Mr. ANDREWS (continuing). Computer tape, and with this machine you are able to do the work much more quickly, efficiently, and economically than you had been able to do that particular work in the past? Is that correct?

Mr. HARRISON. Yes; with a vast increase in quality because you get uppercase and lowercase letters and so on.

Mr. ANDREWS. Mr. Langen, do you have any questions on Mr. Harrison's opening statement?

Mr. LANGEN. Perhaps just one or two questions from the standpoint of understanding the general figures.

PRINTING AND BINDING INCREASE

First, I gather there is about a $4.5 million increase in the total request?

Mr. HARRISON. That is right. This, of course, is our estimate of what Congress is going to need to buy their printing in the next fiscal year.

Mr. LANGEN. I appreciate that, and we will look at that in more detail later on. Anyhow, I do see a $4.5 million increase. Then at page 145 of the bill, the estimated expenditures for 1968 seem to be substantially below 1967 and below 1969, I am sure there is an explanation for it but I fail to see it. for the fiscal year 1968 was $3,615,000 for approximately 32,000 pages. It is estimated there will be 38,000 pages in the fiscal year 1969 and the cost will be $4,410,000.

Mr. HARRISON. The difficulty in attempting to estimate what an agency will need-and I refer to Congress as an agency respectfully because it is one of the many customers we have—the difficulty of estimating what they will need to pay for their printing 18 months in advance, as I have said many times, is next to impossible. You will recall when you first came on the committee we had been estimating the requirements rather conservatively because there was a clause that said if what we asked for was not enough the following year it could be included in the authorization. Then after a couple years of realizing that you would rather we make our original estimate more accurately or attempt to estimate more accurately, we did try this. It would appear 10w that our first real effort to hit this on the nose was 1968, and 18 months later we realize this is not enough because, in the first place, is I said in my statement, the Congressional Record jumped from 34.812 pages to 44,183 pages.

Mr. LANGEN. I appreciate that.

Mr. HARRISON. That is over $1 million right there. So it is just mpossible.

Mr. LANGEN. As a matter of clarification, what does the $22 million nean on page 145 that says “Estimated expenditures, 1968”?

Mr. HARRISON. That is exactly what it means. Mr. LANGEN. That is the total expenditures! Mr. HARRISON. That is our estimate. Mr. LANGEN. Does that also mean there should be a carryover of 4 million plus from the appropriation of last year? Mr. HARRISON. We don't know. Mr. LANGEN. That is what it means as of now? Mr. HARRISON. The balance of $1.8 million was an estimated eficiency for 1967 because we estimated low in 1967.

Mr. LANGEN. So that figure of $22 million does not include the total xpenditures which would add deficiencies for 1967?

Mr. HARRISON. It is our estimate of what it will be for that year, ot what it was short of the year before. Mr. LANGEN. That is all, Mr. Chairman.

CONGRESSIONAL PRINTING AND BINDING

PROGRAM AND FINANCING (IN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS)

1967 actual 1968 estimate 1969 estimate

23, 300

22,000

26, 400

7.741 -9,541

9, 541 -4,841

4,841

21, 500

26.700

31.200

Program by activities:

Printing, binding, and distribution (obligations) (object class 24.0)...
Financing:
Obligations in excess of availability, start of year.
Obligations in excess of availability, end of year.

New obligational authority (appropriation)..
Relation of obligations to expenditures:
Total obligations (affecting expenditures).
Obligated balance start of year.
Obligated balance, end of year.

Expe ditures..
enditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.
Out of prior authorizations.

22,000
11,536
-6, 841

26, 400

6, 841 -2,241

23, 300

8,935
-11,536
20,699
15. 274
5, 425

26,695
20,000
6, 695

31,000 24, 200 6, 800

Mr. ANDREWS. Turning to the item of $31,200,000 for Congressional Printing and Binding, which is, as I mentioned a while ago, $4.5 million above the current appropriation, we will insert the detailed sheets submitted by the Public Printer or such part of the supporting sheet as might be appropriate. The staff can work that out.

(The material follows:)

SUMMARY OF APPROPRIATION ESTIMATES FOR CONGRESSIONAL PRINTING AND

BINDING, FISCAL YEAR 1969

The estimates for congressional printing and binding are to provide funds with which to pay for the cost of printing and binding required for the use of Congress; for the printing, binding, and distribution of the Federal Register, and for printing and binding supplements to the Code of Federal Regulations.

Funds to cover the cost of the printing and binding needs of the various executive and legislative departments, independent establishments, and the judiciary are not included in this appropriation but are provided for in the appropriation acts for these branches of the Government. The Government Printing Office recovers the cost for this work through billings to these agencies.

The total amount estimated for congressional printing and binding for the fiscal year 1969 is $31,200,000; $26,400,000 is estimated to provide for printing and binding work for Congress for the fiscal year 1969 and $4,800,000 is required to reimburse the 1968 appropriation for charges incurred during prior fiscal years which are paid out of the 1968 appropriation, as authorized by law (Public Law 90–57, 90th Congress) which states that the appropriation “shall be available for the payment of obligations incurred under the appropriations for similar purposes for preceding fiscal years." This provision of law recognizes that there can be no effective means to determine in advance the volume of congressional printing which the Government Printing Office is called upon to produce.

The appropriation for fiscal year 1967 is $18,500,000 plus $3 million to cover a deficit incurred in fiscal year 1965 making a total of $21,500,000. There is still a deficit of $4,800,000 for fiscal year 1967 which is included in the total estimated requirements for fiscal year 1969 bringing the total requirements for fiscal year 1967 to $23,300,000.

The appropriation for congressional printing and binding for fiscal year 1968 is $22 million plus $4 million to cover a deficit incurred in fiscal year 1966. $600,000 to cover a deficit incurred in fiscal year 1965, and $100,000 to cover a deficit incurred in fiscal year 1964, for a total of $26,700,000. The following statement has been prepared showing:

1. Fiscal year 1967 expenditures billed through Jauary 31, 1968. 2. Estimated outstanding obligations for fiscal year 1967, as of January 31, 1968.

3. Estimated expenditures for fiscal year 1967.
4. Estimated expenditures for fiscal year 1968.
5. Estimated expenditures for fiscal year 1969.
6. Estimated deficiency for fiscal year 1967.

7. Total estimated requirements for fiscal year 1969. The requirements under each item for fiscal year 1969 are set forth briefly in the order named. All fiscal year 1967 figures in the following items are based on work billed through January 31, 1968.

1. Congressional Record.The proceedings of the Senate and House of Representatives are printed daily in the Congressional Record. Approximately 42,000 copies are printed daily and distributed as provided by law, and are charged to the appropriation for printing and binding for Congress. There also are printed daily about 6,100 additional copies which are delivered and charged to Government Departments on requisitions and to the Superintendent of Documents for sale to subscribers. After the close of each session, the daily proceedings are consolidated, indexed, and about 2,140 copies printed as the bound edition of the Record. In addition, about 225 sets are distributed to Departments depository libraries, and public sales. The total cost to Congress of printing the daily edition and index of the Congressional Record in fiscal year 1967 was $3,395,063 for 37,867 pages of the daily edition and 2,298 pages of the inder. The bound edition which was ordered in the fiscal year 1967 and is still in production is estimated at $807,600. This will bring the total estimated require ments for this item to $4,202,663 for the fiscal year 1967. The estimate submitted

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CONGRESSIONAL PRINTING AND BINDING-STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL YEAR 1967 BILLED THROUGH JAN. 31, 1968–ESTIMATED OUTSTANDING FISCAL YEAR 1967 OBLIGATIONS

AS OF JAN. 31, 1968-ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL YEARS 1967, 1968, AND 1969-ESTIMATED DEFICIENCY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1967–TOTAL ESTIMATED REQUIREMENTS FOR
FISCAL YEAR 1969

Total estimated requirements, fiscal year 1969
Estimated Estimated Total estimated
expenditures, deficiency, requirements,
1969
1967

(7)

$5, 310,000
5,070,000
3,370,000
355,000

815, 000
1, 375.000
3,580,000
900,000
1,185, 000
6,690,000

Total estimated requirements, fiscal year 1967
Expenditures Outstanding Estimated
billed through obligations as expenditures
Jan. 31, 1968 of Jan. 31, 1968
(1)
(2)

(3)

Estimated
expenditures

1968

1969
(6)

$807, 600
915,500

14, 350
65, 235

$3,395, 063
2, 866, 938
2,524,665

189, 715

575, 556
1,028, 695
2,256, 008
675, 262

767,636
4,947, 957

1. Congressional Record
2. Miscellaneous publications
3. Miscellaneous printing and binding-
4. Publications for international exchange
5. Franked envelopes and document franks.
6. House and Senate committee and business calendars
7. Bills, resolutions, and amendments
8. Committee reports.
9. Documents
10. Hearings
11. Federal Register, U.S. Government Organization Manual, Pub-

lic Papers of President, and Weekly Compilation of Presi

dential Documents..
12. Supplements to Code of Federal Regulations.

Total

$4,202, 663
3,782, 438
2,539, 015

254, 950

575, 556
1,028, 695
2, 260, 608

675, 262

767,636
5,342, 357

$3,615,000
3,450,000
2,380,000
200,000
615, 000

980,000
1,800,000
785,000

840,000
5,040,000

$4,410,000
3,840,000
2,850,000

270,000

680,000
1.200,000
2,880,000
900,000
1,120,000
5,750,000

$900,000
1,230,000
520,000

85,000
135, 000
175,000
700,000
65, 900
940,000

4,600

394,400

1,239, 499

533, 821
21,000, 815

80,000

17,500
2, 299, 185

1,319, 499

551,321
123,300,000

1, 710,000

585,000
* 22,000,000

1,730,000
770.000
26,400,000

50,000
4, 800,000

1 $21,500,000 appropriated (Public Law 89-545, 89th Cong.) to cover $3,000,000 estimated defi-
ciency for fiscal year 1965 and $18,500,000 estimated expenditure for fiscal year 1967. In addition
to the $18,500,000 appropriated for fiscal year 1967 obligations, there is a $4,800,000 deficit which
is included in the fiscal year 1969 estimated requirements.

2. Miscellaneous publications.—This item includes printed matter such as the Congressional Directory, Senate and House Journals, memorial addresses, nominations, United States Code and supplements, and publications not carrying a document or report number, such as laws, treaties, committee prints, and similar publications.

The expenditures for miscellaneous publications for the fiscal year 1967 were $2,866,938 for 3,814,577 copies, making 118,772 pages and included all work billed through January 31, 1968. It has been estimated that the incompleted orders will amount to $915,500. This will bring the requirements for this item to $3,782,438 for the fiscal year 1967. The amount estimated for the fiscal year 1968 was $3,450,000 for approximately 115,000 pages. It is estimated that $3,840,000 will be required in the fiscal year 1969 for approximately 120,000 pages.

3. Miscellaneous printing and binding.This item includes letterheads, envelopes, blank paper, copy paper, notices, tags, labels, payrolls, blank books, stenographic notebooks, tablets, wall calendars, miscellaneous blank forms, and binding for both Houses.

The expenditures through January 31, 1968, for miscellaneous printing and binding amounted to $2,524,665 for the fiscal year 1967 for 67,088,901 separate units. Incompleted orders estimated at $14,350 will increase this item to $2,539,015 for the fiscal year 1967. The estimate for the fiscal year 1968 was $2,380,000 for approximately 70,000,000 separate units. The estimate for the fiscal year 1969 is $2,850,000 for about 75,000,000 units.

4. Publications for international exchange and the Library of Congre88.-As provided by law, the Library of Congress is supplied with not to exceed 150 copies of Government publications, including the daily and bound editions of the Congressional Record and certain other Congressional publications of which not to exceed 125 copies shall be for distribution through the Smithsonian Institution, to such governments as may agree to send similar publications of their governments to the United States.

The charges through January 31, 1968, for these publications for the fiscal year 1967 orders amounted to $189,715 for 1,645,307 copies. It has been estimated that $65,235 will be required for the remaining outstanding orders resulting in an estimated requirement of $254,950 for the fiscal year 1967. The estimate for the fiscal year 1968 was $200,000 for 1,350,000 copies. It is estimated that $270,000 will be needed for about 1,700,000 copies in the fiscal year 1969.

5. Franked envelopes and document franks.-Franked envelopes for mailing speeches and documents are furnished to Senators and Representatives, who are also furnished with franks for mailing documents, printed singly or in sheets with perforations at the option of the Member.

The expenditures for franked envelopes and document franks in the fiscal year 1967 amounted to $575,556 for 131,806,434 envelopes and 5,219,230 franks. It was estimated that $615,000 would be required in the fisc year 1968 to print approximately 130 million envelopes and 5,500,000 franks. It is estimated that $680,000 will be needed in the fiscal year 1969 for approximately 140 million envelopes and 5,800,000 franks.

6. House and Senate committee and business calendars.—This heading covers the printing of all House and Senate committee calendars which list the action of the various committees on pending and completed legislation. The House and Senate business calendars are also included in this item.

The expenditures for all House and Senate committee and business calendars for the fiscal year 1967 were $1,028,695 for 68,648 pages. The estimate for the cost of these calendars in the fiscal year 1968 was $980,000 for approximately 70.000 pages. It is estimated that $1,200,000 will be required in the fiscal year 1969 for approximately 75,000 pages.

7. Bills, resolutions, and amendments.—This heading covers the printing of bills, resolutions, and amendments in all forms, including the prints as introduced, referred, reported, and as finally passed.

The expenditures through January 31, 1968, for bills, resolutions, and amendments in the fiscal year 1967 amounted to $2,256,008 for 175,130 pages. Incompleted orders estimated at $4,600 will bring this item to $2,260,608 for the fiscal year 1967. The estimate submitted for the fiscal year 1968 was $1.800.000 for about 120.000 pages. The estimate for the fiscal year 1969 is $2.880,000 for approximately 180.000 pages.

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