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Mr. HARRISON. Mr. Chairman, we are not sure at this point how extensive this is or will be. I think a great deal depends on the success of the bookstores we now have.

At the moment they are all more than paying their way. This venture is in keeping with the President's recent directive to all agencies that they give the taxpayer more service, and make their facilities more available to the individual person throughout the country. In view of this, the Civil Service Commission, GSA, and GPO have discussed this quite extensively and arrived at the idea of setting up a combined Federal information center, using the three agencies as the operating agencies. The Civil Service has an Information Job Center right in the office. GSA has a Government Information Center, and we have the bookstore. The people are intermingled, they work together. It saves money in space and equipping. It is amazingly popular. Our Chicago bookstore is on the 14th floor of the Federal Building, very difficult to find. It is in the back corridor about midway between the two elevators, and yet nearly all of the 8-hour day there are people lined up waiting to get into this bookstore.

Mr. ANDREWS. Your office is the only outlet for sales of documents, books, and so forth, published by the GPO?

Mr. BUCKLEY. That is right.

PUBLICATION SALES Mr. ANDREWS. What do your total sales run? Jr. BUCKLEY. 67 million copies last year, around $14,700,000 gross. Mr. ANDREWS. On that you made this profit? Mr. BUCKLEY. $7,600,000. Mr. ANDREWS. You make about a 50-percent profit? Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes. Mr. ANDREWS. Some people would call it a hundred percent profit.

Mr. BUCKLEY. We have to make the 50 percent since that is the markup provided by law.

GPO REVOLVING FUND

Mr. ANDREWS. I have one question about the revolving fund.

This is on page 143 of the committee print. We have already discussed the condition of the revolving fund and I notice no additional funds are requested for the revolving fund.

You stated that the $15 million that the committee and the Congress gave you last year was adequate.

Mr. HARRISON. Yes, because of our increased net profit.

Mr. ANDREWS. But you are requesting language authorizing the hire of one passenger motor vehicle, is that correct?

Mr. HARRISON. This is the official car we have been leasing.
Mr. ANDREWS. For the Printer?
Mr. HARRISON. Yes, sir.
Mr. ANDREWS. Any questions, gentlemen ?
That is all. Thank you, gentlemen.

Tequestinhat correnteen le

TUESDAY, MAY 9, 1967. GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE

WITNESSES ELMER B. STAATS, COMPTROLLER GENERAL OF THE UNITED

STATES FRANK H. WEITZEL, ASSISTANT COMPTROLLER GENERAL OF THE

UNITED STATES ROBERT F. KELLER, GENERAL COUNSEL LAWRENCE J. POWERS, THE ASSISTANT TO THE COMPTROLLER

GENERAL ELLSWORTH H. MORSE, JR., DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF POLICY AND

SPECIAL STUDIES WILLIAM A. NEWMAN, JR., DIRECTOR, DEFENSE DIVISION ADOLPH T. SAMUELSON, DIRECTOR, CIVIL DIVISION OYE V. STOVALL, DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL DIVISION THOMAS E. SULLIVAN, DIRECTOR, TRANSPORTATION DIVISION CHARLES W. KIRBY, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, DEFENSE DIVISION HERSCHEL J. SIMMONS, DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE

SERVICES SANFORD H. CORNETT, CHIEF, BUDGET AND FINANCE BRANCH

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Program and financing—Continued

[in thousands of dollars)

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1 Includes capital outlay as follows: 1966, $79,000; 1967, $156,000; 1968, $96,000. 2 Selected resources as of June 30 are as follows:

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Personnel compensation: 11.1 Permanent positions...-. 11.3 Positions other than permanen 11.5 Other personnel compensation.

Total personnel compensation...... Direct obligations:

Personnel compensation. 12.0 Personnel benefits... 13.0 Benefits for former personnel. 21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 22.0 Transportation of things... 230 Rent, communications, and utilities 24.0 Printing and reproduction.. 25.1 Other services...... 25. 2 Services of other agencies. 28.0 Supplies and materials. 31.0 Equipment. 42.0 Insurance claims and indemnities

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Total direct obligations...

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Mr. ANDREWS. The committee will come to order.

This is the first time that the General Accounting Office has come before our legislative subcommittee to justify their request for an appropriation. We are glad to have you. When I first came to Congress I served on the Independent Offices Subcommittee and the General Accounting Office appeared before that subcommittee.

The Comptroller General at that time was Lindsay Warren of North Carolina and he was succeeded by Joe Campbell. He was succeeded recently by Mr. Elmer B. Staats. Mr. Staats went to the General Accounting Office from the Budget Bureau with a record of distinguished service in the Bureau of the Budget. He, too, used to come before our Subcommittee on Independent Offices. So we feel like we are having homefolks come before us this morning.

We will now take up the request for the General Accounting Office which appears on page 148 of the committee print. The General Accounting Office is, of course, a part of the legislative branch, but heretofore has been included in the independent offices bill

The total appropriation request for 1968 is $52,900,000, which is an increase of $4,400,000, excluding supplementals, and $3,500,000 including the supplementals for 1967. We are glad to have Mr. Elmer B. Staats, the Comptroller General of the United States, along with the members of his staff, before us today.

Do you have a general statement to present to us, Mr. Staats!

GENERAL STATEMENT OF COMPTROLLER GENERAL

Mr. Staats. Yes, I do have, Mr. Chairman.

May I say at the outset that we, too, look forward to working with this subcommittee. There are no strangers on this subcommittee as far as we are concerned. We have had an opportunity to become acquainted with most, if not all, of the members over a period of time.

I have a prepared statement and with your permission perhaps I would read that at this point. I believe copies have been made available.

Mr. ANDREWS. You may proceed with your general statement.

Mr. STAATS. Mr. Chairman and members of the subcommittee, we appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the work of the General Accounting Office and our budget estimates for 1968. The justifications we have furnished your subcommittee provide details concerning our work and accomplishments, our organization, our plans, and our fiscal requirements. My statement will summarize and highlight our request.

BUDGET ESTIMATES

We are requesting an appropriation for fiscal year 1968 of $52.9 million, an increase of $4.4 million over the appropriation of $48.5 million for 1967.

Since the 1967 appropriation was enacted we have had to assume the following additional fixed costs totaling $2,186,000 over which we had no control and which are also reflected in the increase of $4.4 million for the 1968 budget requests:

(1) $1.3 million to cover the cost of the pay increase, Public Law 89-504, effective July 3, 1966.

(2) $150,000 to cover the cost of moving and related expenses as authorized in Public Law 89-516.

(3) $304,000 to cover the cost of the increase in pay scale for GS-7 and GS-9 accountants and auditors as authorized by the United States Civil Service Commission under 5 U.S.C. 5303.

(4) $432,000 to cover the added cost resulting from the increase in the audit of transportation payments for military operations in Vietnam.

These additional costs of $2,186,000 increased our total requirements for 1967 to $50,686,000. However, we were able to absorb $1,336,000 of these added costs primarily because of delay in filling vacancies. This resulted in a net revised estimate of $49,350,000 for 1967, requiring a supplemental appropriation of $850,000.

INCREASES FOR 1968

Consequently, for fiscal year 1968 we are requesting an increase of $3,550,000 over our revised requirements of $49,350,000 for 1967. The principal elements accounting for the increase in 1968 over the revised 1967 estimate are to provide for:

(1) $1,509,600 to cover the cost of salary adjustments and periodic step increases.

(2) An increase of $833,700 for an average increase of 75 positions in our professional staff and 20 positions for the supporting staff.

(3) An increase amounting to $282,500 in the staff required to audit transportation bills growing out of the increased military operations in Vietnam.

(4) An increase in travel of $400,000 to cover both the projected increase in the professional staff and the increase in travel status of the staff during the year. About one-half of this amount

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