Page images
PDF
EPUB

paper and various other supplies, but that is paid for on a cost basis and goes into the revolving fund. We also do some bookkeeping in the way of collecting from Members' accounts and charging it to their stationery account, and so forth.

Mr. STEED. Do they add to their income from these operations? Are they operated for profit?

Mr. JENNINGS. Mr. Chairman, as far as I know, there is no accountability made on their operation, certainly to the Clerk of the House.

I do not know whether any accountability is made to the House Administration Committee or to this committee. I am just not aware of it. I do not know what their profit and loss statement would be. Mr. STEED. Are there any questions? (No response.)

TECHNICAL ASSISTANT TO THE ATTENDING PHYSICIAN

Mr. ANDREWS. Technical assistant to the attending physician.

Mr. JENNINGS. For a technical assistant in the office of the attend. ing physician to be appointed by the attending physician, subject to the approval of the Speaker, $15,100, compared with $15,075 appro. priated for 1967, or an increase of $25.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

That is the same as last year, Mr. Chairman. As I have explained in several instances, this is rounded out. None of them exceed $50, some of them are $25, and some are $15. For all intents and purposes, we are asking for the same amount appropriated for 1967.

Mr. ANDREWS. The increase is due to the salary increase?

Mr. JENNINGS. No, sir; due to a bookkeeping entry rounding out to the even figure.

Mr. ANDREWS. How many jobs are involved here?
Mr. JENNINGS. Just one is involved here.
Mr. ANDREWS. Are there any questions about that item ?

Mr. ANDREWS. How long have we had this technical assistant ? Many years?

Mr. JENNINGS. Many years.
Mr. ANDREWS. Any questions about this?
(No response.)

OFFICIAL REPORTERS OF DEBATES
Mr. ANDREWS. The next item.

Mr. JENNINGS. For official reporters of debates, $277,100, compared with $271,700 appropriated for 1967, or an increase of $5,400.

We are requesting this increase to carry out the provisions of House Resolution 1055, adopted October 19, 1966, which increased the basic salary of five employees.

[blocks in formation]

$ you ask to print, $276,90atter, but according

Mr. ANDREWS. It is a small matter, but according to the schedule on page 33 of our print, $276,900 would cover the payroll in 1968, whereas you ask for $200 more than that. Why?

Mr. JENNINGS. As I said, Mr. Chairman, that is for the increase according to this House resolution adopted October 1966 which increased the basic salary of five employees. I have that resolution.

Mr. ANDREWS. Who sets the salaries of these reporters?
Mr. JENNINGS. The House by resolution.

It comes out of the House resolution. I inserted this earlier, but it is House Resolution 1055, passed October 19, 1966, which increases the basic compensation of

(1) the Superintendent of the House Press Gallery shall be $5,400 per annum;

(2) the First Assistant Superintendent of the House Press Gallery shall be $4,800 per annum;

(3) the Third Assistant Superintendent of the House Press Gallery shall be $3,360 per annum;

(4) the Fourth Assistant Superintendent of the House Press Gallery shall be $2.650 per annum;

(5) the Official Reporter of Debates of the House of Representatives with the longest service as a Debate Reporter shall be known as the Chief Reporter of Debates of the House of Representatives and shall be paid basic compensation at the rate of $9,000 per annum;

(6) other Official Reporters of Debates of the House of Representatives each shall be paid basic compensation at the rate of $8,880 per annum. Mr. ANDREWS. The $9,000 basic shows up as $24,753 gross.

Mr. JENNINGS. As I pointed out, this is one of the real differences between employees under the House Classification Act and those not included. There are others here

(7) the clerk of the Official Reporters of Debates of the House shall be $5,425 per annum;

(8) the number one assistant clerk to the Official Reporters of Debates of the House shall be $4,200 per annum;

(9) the number two assistant clerk of the Official Reporters of Debates of the House shall be $3,730 per annum.

It is provided this would be paid out of the contingent fund until such time as it was annualized by this committee.

Mr. ANDREWs. Your request before the committee is for $277,100, is that correct, for the salaries of 17 employees?

Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir.

Mr. ANDREWS. Any questions about that item on the Official Reporters of Debates ?

(No response.)

[ocr errors][merged small]

OFFICIAL REPORTERS TO COMMITTEES
Mr. ANDREWS. Next, the "Official reporters to committees."

Mr. JENNINGS. For “Official reporters to committees," $273,925; this is the same as appropriated for 1967.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

Mr. ANDREWS. That 1967 must include a supplemental, because this is $266,200.

Mr. JENNINGS. That is correct, Mr. Chairman.
Mr. ANDREWS. Is that increase due to the Pay Act increase?
Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir. The same number of people are required.
Mr. ANDREWS. Seventeen?
Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir.
Mr. ANDREWS. Any questions about that?
(No response.)

APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE, INVESTIGATIVE STAFF Mr. ANDREWS. Next is the Committee on Appropriations. Mr. JENNINGS. For salaries and expenses, studies and examinations of executive agencies by the Committee on Appropriations, to be expended in accordance with section 202 (b) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, $750,000, compared with $746,000 appropriated for 1967, or an increase of $4,000.

[blocks in formation]

There again, the $4,000 is merely to take care of the legislative pay increases and additional contributions to the health benefits. For all intents and purposes, it is the same as requested last year.

Mr. ANDREWS. This provides the salaries for five employees; is that right?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. And reimbursement to other agencies, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. ANDREWS. The five employees' salaries amount to $81,600 ?
Mr. JENNINGS. Yes.

Mr. ANDREWS. $668,333 is allotted here for reserve for other employment and expenses.

Mr. JENNINGS. Right.

Mr. ANDREWS. That means they could call on other Government agencies to furnish it, as they have for years?

Mr. JENNINGS. That is true, and pay for it. These are the funds for that purpose.

Mr. ANDREWS. I think most members of this subcommittee know that any subcommittee on appropriations has the right to call for an investigation. If something were to come before this committee and we felt it needed a really finetooth investigation we could go to the chairman of the full committee and make a request for assignment of staff to the job of study and rendering a fullblown report.

Mr. JENNINGS. This is the fund from which it would be paid. Mr. ANDREWS. For this project, reserve for other employment and expenses, you had $664,333 in 1967, and $623,101 in 1966.

Mr. JENNINGS. Right. Mr. ANDREWS. Could you tell us how much of those amounts were unexpended ?

Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir. As of February 28, Mr. Chairman, we had $359,778.21 remaining available. Mr. ANDREWS. Of the 1967 appropriation, which was $746,000. In 1966, you had a balance of $52,134.89. Mr. JENNINGS. And in 1965, a balance of $30,657.07, which is cutting it close, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. ANDREWS. Of course, the amount of expenditure depends upon the number of investigations.

Mr. JENNINGS. Yes, sir.
Mr. ANDREWS. Any questions about that?
(No response.)

MONDAY, MAY 1, 1967.

OFFICE OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL

WITNESS

EDWARD O. CRAFT, LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL

Mr. ANDREWS. Next is the Office of the Legislative Counsel.

Mr. JENNINGS. This item appears at page 36 of the committee print. For salaries and expenses of the Office of the Legislative Counsel, $350,000, compared with $328,780 appropriated for 1967, or an increase of $21,220. Mr. Edward Craft, the Legislative Counsel, will be pleased to appear before the committee to answer any questions that you care to ask. All positions and rates of salaries are set by the Legislative Counsel, with the approval of the Speaker, except the Legislative Counsel, whose salary is set by law.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Mr. ANDREWS. Mr. Craft, what is in the increase of $21,220 due to?

Mr. CRAFT. That would be in part for an additional attorney. We have already made a selection. It would also be for additional clerical

help and for promotions. It is our practice to appoint young attorneys and to give them promotions as they gain experience. Actually, I think we ought to have a reserve for two attorneys and that would mean an overall appropriation of about $355,000.

Mr. ANDREWS. Tell us something about your work.

Mr. CRAFT. As you know, our function is to assist committees and Members, when requested to do so, in drafting bills, resolutions, and amendments. I have a tabulation for the period since 1952. It is numerical. I don't know that it is too helpful but it does show statistically the number of requests we have had over the years.

Mr. ANDREWS. Yours is the office which a Member can call and ask that a bill be prepared for him?

Mr. CRAFT. Yes.

Mr. ANDREWS. Do you have a table showing the volume of work that you have done over the past few years?

Mr. CRAFT. Yes.
Mr. ANDREWS. Pass it around and insert one in the record at this

point.

(The information follows:)

OFFICE OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Jobs" done for committees and members (in the drafting of bills and resolutions

and amendments thereto, etc.) since 1952 1

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

1 In this work record, a request for assistance is counted as a single "job," whether the work took an hour or 2 or whether it took most of the time of 1 or 2 men for weeks (as often happens in the case of bills worked on for committees).

No record is kept of many instances (running into the hundreds during each session) in which Members or their secretaries request assistance on drafting or legal problems, but where no written material is prepared by the office.

Mr. ANDREWS. You have no way of determining the volume of work your office will have?

Mr. CRAFT. No. It has been increasing steadily over the years, and of course as the legislation becomes more complex it takes more time on the work that we do. These are rather large figures for an office of our size.

Mr. ANDREWS. What do these figures indicate? During the s9th Congress from January 1965 to January 1967 you had for committees, 813. What does that mean?

Mr. CRAFT. That means we did some work on 813 requests from committees. Some of them of course would be very minor and some of them would be fairly extensive.

Mr. ANDREWS. Then for Members you show 5,300. Does that mean you did work for 5,300 Members of Congress?

Mr. CRAFT. No. That is requests. Many Members ask for quite a few jobs to be done. Many of these of course are reintroductions of

« PreviousContinue »