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DENNISTON & PARTRIDGE CO.,

Nevoton, Iora, April 15, 1950. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, UNITED STATES, Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power,

Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN: It is our understanding the steel industry is being investigated, and we thought you might be interested in the following comments.

For the last thirty-five years we have been purchasing field fencing, steel prod. ucts, wire, nails, and barbed wire from American Steel & Wire Co. Most of our purchases have been made through their Chicago office located at 208 South La Salle Street.

During this time they have taken care of our requirements in a satisfactory manner, and while we placed a large amount of our tonnage with the American Steel & Wire Co., we at no time had a tie-up which caused us to place our steel orders exclusively with this company. We felt free to place our orders with other firms as well, and we have made purchases from other companies such as Republic Steel Co., Keystone Steel & Wire Co., Northwestern Steel & Wire Co., and others.

The sales policy used by the American Steel & Wire Co. has always appeared fair and satisfactory to us, and over this period of years we have had no dealings with them that would be a reflection on their sales policy. Very truly yours,

DENNISTON & PARTRIDCGE CO.,
HOMER W. DENNISTON.

WOLVERINE SUPPLY & MFG. Co., Page and Fontella Streets, N. S. Pittsburgh (12), Pa., April 17, 1950. Hon. EMANUEL CELLER, House of Representatives, U. S. Committee on the Judiciary,

Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power, Washington, D. C. HONORABLE SIR: Your activities in connection with study of U. S. Steel Corp. have come to our attention. We wish to advise, through the years we have had many business transactions with the Corporation and have found them to be mutually satisfactory. Please advise if we can be of any further service. Very truly yours,

WOLVERTON SUPPLY & MFG. Co.,
Jos. P. SCHMITT, Vice President.

ARMSTRONG-BRAY & Co., 5364-76 Northwest Highway, Chicago 30, April 12, 1950. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D. C. The United States Committee of Judiciary Subcommittee on the Study of

Monopoly Power. GENTLEMEN : It has come to our attention that you are now investigating the United States Steel Corporation to determine if they are a monopoly.

We would like to take this occasion to give your our experience with one of their subsidiaries, namely, American Steel & Wire Co., with whom we have done business for the past twenty years.

In all of our dealings with American Steel & Wire Co. they have been fair and have gone out of their way any number of times to offer much-needed help to our company, which is classified as a “small business.” We have many friends in small businesses in this area who regularly do business with American Steel & Wire Co., and in no instance have we ever heard that they were trying to overpower or dictate policies to them.

As far as being monopolistic, we cannot see how they could be with the competition that they have on all of their lines that they sell to us. We can buy steel and wire from many sources and pressure has never been exerted on us to do business with them, except that which could be classified as good salesmanship.

Any curbing action that your committee would take against American Steel & Wire Co. would be very detrimental to our small business, as well as many others that I know of in this territory. They have been exceptionally fair in all of

their dealings, and, in our estimation, set an excellent example of how a supplier
should treat their customers.
Yours very truly

ARMSTRONG-BRAY & Co.,
ALBRIGHT BRAY, Vice President.

BURKHARDYT STEEL COMPANY,

869 South Broadway, Denver 9, Colo., April 13, 1950. Hon. EMANUEL CELLER, Chairman, Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power, Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives,

United States, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. CELLER: It has been called to my attention that your committee intends to have hearings affecting the United States Steel Corporation and I thought you would like to have an expression from me as to our experiences.

The Carnegie-Illinois Steel Corporation is our main source of supply for structural steel, plates, wide flange beams, sheets, bars and strips; our experiences with this company has been most pleasant and cordial. While they are a large corporation they have followed to the best of my knowledge, constructive policies regarding service, price and quality, and I would like to commend them most highly. Yours very truly,

BURKHARDT STEEL COMPANY,
A. O, BURKHARDT, Vice President.

MARYLAND FINE & SPECIALTY WIRE Co., Inc.,

Cockeysville, Md., April 14, 1950. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, UNITED STATES, Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power,

Washington, D. C. (Att.: Hon. Emanuel Celler, Chairman.) GENTLEMEN: It has come to my attention that in your study of Monopoly Power you have scheduled hearings on the United States Steel Corporation beginning April 17, 1950.

As a small manufacturer of wire having done business in the past years with the American Steel & Wire Company, a subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation, we have no indication in any form that this Concern is endeavoring to exercise a Monopoly or tendencies in that direction.

As a matter of fact the large steel companies have been most helpful to our organization in its efforts to establish and conduct a small business. Your very truly,

MARYLAND FINE & SPECIALTY WIRE Co., Inc.,
L. C. CREWE, Jr., President.

LOONAN LUMBER COMPANY, 222 North Main Avenue, Sioux Falls, S. D., April 12, 1950. Hon. EMANUEL CELLER, Chairman, Study of Monopoly Power,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: It has come to my attention that you are chairman of a committee to investigate any monopolistic practices of the United States Steel Corporation.

This is to advise you that this company has been making purchases from the American Steel & Wire Company, a subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation, for over a quarter of a century and in all that time we have never had occasion to be suspicious of any monopolistic practices. There has never been a time when we were not treated the same as any of the much larger buyers.

All during the last war we received all of our allocations—no more--no less. Ours is a small corporation operating seven retail lumber yards in small

South Dakota and Nebraska towns. Our Capital Stock is $283,000. We mention this merely to show you that we are a small corporation.

Our purchases from the American Steel & Wire Company amounts to an average of about fifteen carloads per year of woven wire, barb wire, steel fence posts and nails. Hoping the above will assist you in your investigation, Yours very truly,

LOONAN LUMBER COMPANY,
K. J. BENZ, President.

MARLBORO WIRE Goops COMPANY, INC.,

Marlboro, Ja88., April 12, 1950. Hon. EMANUEL CELLER, Chairman Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power, House of Representatives,

Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: It has come to the writer's attention that your committee is investigating the activities of the United States Steel Corp. because of alleged monopolistic practices which have been detrimental to the steel industry and to users of steel.

We have been doing business with American Steel & Wire Company, a subsidiary of United States Steel, for the past 25 or 30 years and have always found them to be very cooperative and helpful in assisting us in solving our various problems with steel wire and steel strip which we use as our raw material.

We have, in the course of that period, had occasion to obtain a percentage of our requirements from other steel companies, both large and small, and have not found that the attitude of the U. S. Steel subsidiary was in any way different than that of other independent steel producers.

Therefore, we would urge that very careful study be made of any testimony accusing U. S. Steel of being monopolistic as our experience has been very pleasant with them through the years and we have found that their trade practices has always been above reproach.

They have always been willing to stand back of their product and to make any adjustments necessary to compensate for occasional faulty material or improper specifications should these have occurred through error or a mistake.

Again, we would urge that every consideration be given before a definite accusation is made. Very truly yours,

MARLBORO WIRE GOODS COMPANY,
H. A. MOINEAU, Secretary.

CEMENT GUN COMPANY, INC,

Allentown, Pa., April 12, 1950. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, United States Committee on Judiciary, Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power,

Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN : In connection with our studies of monopoly power, it is our desire to put ourselves on record relative to our findings in connection with the steel industry.

Operating as we do throughout the entire United States, we are pleased to advise that we have received fair prices and fair treatment from suppliers from whom we have purchased steel in accordance with our requirements.

We have not, even during the war period, experienced any tendency towards monopolization by the manufacturers, and while at times we anticipated delays and interferences in shipments, we were able in all cases to operate in accordance with schedule.

Our findings at all times have been that the manufacturers and suppliers hare been most cooperative. Yours very truly,

CEMENT GUN COMPANY, INC.,

C. J. McNALLY,
General Manager and Chief Engineer.

BERLISS BEARING COMPANY, 14-18 Carmer Avenue, Belleville 9, N. J., April 11, 1950. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES, Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power,

Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN : In connection with the proposed inquiry on nor polistic practices of the steel industry to take place beginning April 17, 1950, we are taking this opportunity to advise you that we have had very cordial relations with all the steel companies with whom we do business.

Among the companies we deal with, the following are representative:
American Steel & Wire Company
Republic Steel Corporation
The Stanley Works
Sharon Steel Corporation
Newman Crosby Steel Corporation.

Trusting that this letter may benefit you in some way during your proceedings, we are Very truly yours,

BERLISS BEARING COMPANY,
M. B. BORKS.

COLUMBIA CABLE & ELECTRIC CORPORATION,

255 Chestnut Street, Brooklyn 8, N. Y., April 11, 1950. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS, Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Powers,

Washington, D. O. GENTLEMEN : In conection with the investigation of the United States Steel Corporation, we thought it would be in order for us to submit the following information.

We are a small company, employing less than 150 people, and have been doing business with the United States Steel Corporation for over thirty years. During this period we found their practice fair and above board and also have found them to be a reliable and satisfactory source of supply. We hope that this information will be helpful in your investigation. Respectfully yours,

COLUMBIA CABLE & ELECTRIC CORP.,
AARON W. DANIELS, President.

S. L. ALLEN & Co., Inc., Fifth Street and Glenwood Avenue, Phiadelphia 40, Pa., April 14, 1950. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY, Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power,

House of Representatives of the United States, Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN: As a user of Steel products for many years, we would like to convey to you and your Committee our thoughts on the hearings and investigations of the U. S. Steel Corporation; which, froni reading the daily publications, we understand will start the week of April 17th.

We have for many years been a customer of Carnegie-Illinois Steel Corporation, a subsidiary of U. S. Steel. The maintenance of adequate-reserves of raw materials, transportation facilities as well as the extensive and costly manufacturing facilities required for adequately servicing the Steel needs of this County, require tremendous investments. It is our belief that U. S. Steel today has a smaller percentage of the capacity of the industry than it had prior to the recent war, and certainly much smaller than it had 25 or 30 years ago. Our relationship with the subsidiary companies, whose products we use, over the years has generally been most satisfactory. Most certainly we have not been able to obtain all of the Steel we have required at various times, however, the situation in this respect has been not greatly different from the supply situation of many other materials. Likewise, we feel that prices of Steel have not increased as much over the years as have prices of many other products. Very truly yours,

S. L. ALLEN & Co., Inc.,
M. J. SCAMMELL, Jr., Purchasing Agent.

AMIOK SHEET METAL WORKS, 2727 Sixth Avenue South, Seattle 4, Wash., April 13, 1950. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, UNITED STATES, Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Study of Monopoly Power,

Washington, D. C.

(Attn: Emanuel Celler, Chairman.) GENTLEMEN : As a small steel fabricator we would like to express our feelings regarding the question of monopolies and the United States Steel Corporation.

As a purchaser of steel since 1908 we have found the U. S. Steel Corporation to be anything but monopolistic. This has been proven to us time and time again by their actual price quotations as compared with those offered by what we might call small steel companies. During the last war and immediately thereafter when steel was so desperately short, there was never a time that the U, S. Steel Corporation ever tried to take advantage of us due to these conditions.

Although we do not purchase all of our steel from the U. S. Steel Corporation we do feel that they are far from being monopolistic. Yours very truly,

AMICK SHEET METAL WORKS,
CHAD KERRIHARD.

Summary of investments, profits, and rates of return on stockholders' inrest

ment for United States Steel Corp. and other leading steel companies, for each of the years 1936-48, after provision for Federal and other income tares

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1 Includes: Bethlehem Steel Corp., Republic Steel Corp., Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp., Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co., National Steel Corp., Inland Steel Co., American Rolling Mill Co., Wheeling Steel Corp., Otis Steel Co. (absorbed by Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. June 30, 1942), and Pittsburgh Steel Co.

3 Average of investments at beginning and end of year for each company.
3 Net profit (or loss) after provisions for Federal and other income taxes.
4 Denotes loss.
* United States Steel Corp. less 3 railroads: 1947, 9.41 percent; 1948, 9.8 percent.
Source: Prepared by the Federal Trade Commission.

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