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If shipments made hereunder for any two weeks period persistently analyze below 10% in manganese, we may cancel this contract.

Shipments to be made in dump bottom cars. This office to be notified of car numbers as soon as shipment is made.

NOTICE.—Send Invoice to S. B. Slater, Purchasing Agent, Southern District, Birmingham, Ala. Invoice must be rendered in Original and Duplicate, Showing our Order Number and Point of Shipment, and be Accompanied by Bill of Lading or Express Receipt in Support of Delivery Charges, if any. We Allow no Charges for Crating or Drayage.

REPUBLIC IRON & STEEL COMPANY, By S. B. SLATER,

Purchasing Agent, Southern District.

EXHIBIT S-46

REPUBLIC STEEL CORPORATION

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT

SOUTHERN DISTRICT

P. 0. Box 2594

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

Invoice in triplicate to above address. Show weights and number of packages on all invoices. JOE MOSTELLER, Cartersville, Ga.

Please enter our order subject to terms and conditions on face and reverse side hereof. Acknowledge receipt of order. State shipping date. Our order and requisition numbers must appear on invoices, B/L's, packages and correspondence.

Address communications to: H. C. Green. Purchase Order No. AC-254-P. Date: Jan. 1, 1950. Req. No.- Delivery: See below. F. O. B.: Shipper to pay 90¢ N. T. Frt. and we the balance. Terms: Net cash 3 times per month.

QUALITY AND DESCRIPTION

Alabama Sales and Use Tax Permit No. 1

STANDING ORDER-YEAR 1950_BROWN ORE

Quantity: Your production as released by us.
Analysis: 40% and better iron and manganese.
Shipping point: Cartersville, Ga.
Equipment: Hopper bottom gondolas.
Size of ore: 4" and under.
Rejection point : Each car of ore to be analyzed separately; if any one car of

ore is shipped analyzing 39.99% and under, iron and manganese only, we are to pay freight and use, or dump, and charge freight and unloading expense back

to shipper, our option. Moisture: Deduction to be made for all moisture. Weights and analyses: Our weights and analysis on each car to govern all

settlements.
Price, per gross ton :

40 to 44.99%-912¢ per unit.
45 to 46.99%-934¢ per unit.
47 to 51.99%-10€ per unit.
52 to 52.99%-1014¢ per unit.
53% and up—1042¢ per unit.

This order to remain in effect from date through Dec. 31, 1950, unless canceled by us. Ship to Republic Steel Corporation, Storekeeper, Blast Furnace Dept., Alabama City, Alabama.

REPUBLIC STEEL CORPORATION.

F. J. LASSING,
Manager of Purchases and Raw Materials.

EXHIBIT S-47

TENNESSEE COAL, IRON & RAILROAD Co.,
UNITED STATES CORPORATION SUBSIDIARY,

Birmingham, Ala., June 22, 1944. Mr. FRANK D. SMITH,

Cartersville, Ga. DEAR FRANK: I am closing analysis of the sample of sinter which you recently sent to me.

Before sending this sample to the laboratory I looked it over carefully and would say that as far as physical conditions go it would be an attractive ore for use in our blast furnaces. The chemical analysis speaks for itself. You will note the iron content of 52.78, and the manganese content of 6.51. This manganese content should have some added value if it can be maintained in a comparatively uniform amount so that the blast furnace burden could be accurately computed. However, the silica and alumina are comparatively high.

I have made no purchases of ore of this character, but it would be my opinion that it would probably bring about 8 cents per unit of combined iron and manganese, and it is possible that the manganese would be valued separately at from 20 to 25 cents per unit. Because of the high phosphorous content it could not be used for any of the special purposes to which we ordinarily put iron ore sinter. Yours truly,

ARTHUR J. BLAIR, Ore Agent.

TENNESSEE COAL, IRON AND RAILROAD COMPANY

LABORATORY ANALYSIS

File: 12890-S. Analysis No. 82767. Ensley Works, June 21, 1944.
To: Mr. A. J. Blair, Geologist.
Sample of : Iron ore, treated.
FRANK D. SMITH,

Cartersville, Ga.:
Re: Your letter of May 23, 1944.

Sample dried at 212° F.
Met. iron.
52. 78 | Mangan---

6.51 Silica15. 52 Phos.

.47 Alumina 5. 7710_

4. 30 CHAs. W. HINMAN, Chemist.

EXHIBIT S-48

SLOSS-SHEFFIELD STEEL & IRON Co.,

Birmingham 2, Ala., May 10, 1944. Mr. FRANK D. SMITH,

Bow No. 102, Cartersville, Ga. DEAR FRANK: I want to apologize for not having given you the information on the sinter, but it was lost temporarily and slipped my mind. Our analysis of the sample you left is as follows: Insoluble matter__

19. 16 Metallic iron.

53. 70 Phosphorus.

. 44 Manganese

2.93

I hardly know what to tell you about the market of this material, for while it is an excellent appearing sinter and the metallic body is 56.63 percent, it is also high in insoluble matter, which reduces the value in the furnace considerably. However, it would appear to be a very favorable furnace material and I am sure that you could find a ready market for all you could produce.

As you know, we have not been in the market for ore recently, and now have under construction a concentration plant to make a very similar product, and I have been unable to get a definite commitment from our furnace men as to how much, if any, they could use or what price they would pay.

My own personal opinion is that you can find a ready market with one of the other furnace companies at the top brown ore scale, as it should be somewhat better than the best brown ore available. Yours very truly,

G. R. ARMSTRONG, Chief Engineer.

EXHIBIT S-49

REPUBLIC STEEL CORP.,

Birmingham, Ala., June 3, 1944. Mr. FRANK D. SMITH,

Cartersville, Ga. DEAR SIR: Following please find analysis on the sample of sinter you sent me and mentioned in your letter of May 19. Iron.--55. 29 | Alumina-

5. 30 Insoluble.. 18. 10 Manganese

6. 20 Silica. 15. 60 | Phosphorus-

. 48 I believe this analysis checks along with about what you told me you had received elsewhere.

As for the carbon, I am unable to unfathom your theory because when all of the gases or other foreign matters are burned off to determine the insoluble then the carbon would have burned out also, and with the above silica and alumina analysis it would occur to me that the above insoluble is correct.

I hope this gives you the information desired, and although the silica is extremely high I would not say that it is not a usable product, though I don't think it is an open-hearth product. Yours truly,

W. S. SANFORD, Manager, Land Department.

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