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Masc. Fem.

Neut. Nom. he she it

they Poss. his her, hers its

their, theirs Obj. him her it

them Note.—The forms mine, thine, ours, yours, theirs, and sometimes his and hers, though possessive in form, have come to be used only in the nominative and objective cases. They are in reality substitutes for a noun and its possessive modifier. This book is mine. Yours is larger. Do you like this hat of mine ?-Maxwell's Grammar.

COMPOUND PERSONAL PRONOUNS

Compound personals are formed by the addition of "self" or "selves," and are declined as follows:

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whoever whosoever

whomever whomsoever

whosesoever

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Nom. and Obj. boy

boys Possessive boy's

boys' Observation.-Observe that only personal pronouns have two number forms, and that no distinction is made for gender except in the personal pronouns, third person, singular number.

The adjective pronouns are not declined, as most of them have but one form.

"One" and its compounds-"other," "another," "either," and "neither"have possessive forms; as, "One's business,” Another's work.” “One” also has a plural, “ones.” “None" is usually singular, but is sometimes used with a plural verb; as, “None of us were old enough.”

“Each," “either,” and “neither” are always singular; as, Each of the boys is decorated with a medal.” Either of them is all right.” “Neither of the children wishes to go."

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EXERCISE 40

1. Write a sentence containing a noun and one containing a pronoun in the

nominative dependent case. 2. Write a sentence containing a noun and one containing a pronoun in the

nominative independent case. 3. Write a sentence containing a noun and one containing a pronoun in the

objective case. 4. Write a sentence containing a noun and one containing a pronoun in the

possessive case. 5. Write a sentence containing a noun, one containing a pronoun, and one con

taining an adjective used as a predicate complement. 6. Write a sentence containing a noun and one containing a pronoun used as

an objective complement. 7. Write a sentence containing a noun and one containing an adjective used as a resultant complement.

(Deduct six and two-thirds per cent for each error.)

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LESSON XXI

CASE (continued)

NOMINATIVE CASE CONSTRUCTIONS

A noun or pronoun may be in the nominative case as:

Dependent Constructions 1. Subject of the finite verb:

John and I study grammar. 2. Complement of the finite copula :

He is a musician. It is I. 3. Subject of infinitive:

Mr. Cannon is to be speaker of the house.

He is to be speaker of the house. 4. Complement of the infinitive whose subject is nominative:

Mr. Cannon is to be speaker of the house.

I was thought to be he. 5. Complement of the copulative participle whose subject is possessive:

His being judge should not excuse him.

Its being he should make no difference. 6. In apposition :

Time, the tomb-builder, holds his fierce career.

Independent Constructions 7. By direct address:

Gentlemen, you will please come to order. 8. Absolutely with a participle:

The speaker having come, we proceeded with the program.

He being gone, she was left to her own devices. 9. By pleonasm :

Gad, a troop shall overcome him. 10. By inscription :

The Chicago Tribune. 11. By exclamation:

Goodness!

OBJECTIVE CASE CONSTRUCTIONS

A noun or pronoun may be in the objective case as: 1. Object of transitive verb:

Columbus discovered America.

We could not reach him. 2 Object of preposition:

Canst thou name me the three greatest of our kings?
A comrade stood beside him.

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