Page images
PDF
EPUB

(4) Where an item is of special manufacture or design and is not readily available from commercial sources.

(5) Where an adequate industry distribution system does not exist to assure availability at use point.

(6) Where volume purchases are necessary to secure timely deliveries and advantageous prices.

(7) Where market conditions are such that supply through storage and issue is required to assure adequate supply.

(8) Where stocking of supplies and equipment necessary for implementation of emergency plans is required for an indefinite period.

§ 101-25.101-3 Supply through consoli

dated purchase for direct delivery

to use points. The following criteria shall govern in determining whether an item can be most advantageously supplied through consolidated purchase for direct delivery to use points:

(a) The items shall be equipment or supply items of such a character that it is feasible to forecast requirements for delivery to specific use points; and

(b) Conditions exist where any of the following factors requires consolidated purchasing of such items for direct delivery to use points

(1) Where greatest price advantage, both direct and indirect costs considered, is obtainable through large definite quantity purchasing.

(2) Where an item is of special manufacture or design and is not readily available from commercial sources.

(3) Where market conditions are such that central procurement is required to assure adequate supply.

(4) Where contracts for production quantities are necessary to secure timely deliveries and advantageous prices.

(5) Where the quantity is large enough to assure lowest transportation costs or, conversely, where transportation costs for small quantity redistribution are so excessive that it is not feasible to store and issue the items.

the medium of indefinite quantity requirement contracts covering specific periods and providing for delivery to use points as needs arise:

(a) The item shall be such a character that

(1) Handling on a storage and issue basis is not economically sound, under the criteria prescribed in 8101-25.101-2;

(2) Rate of use and frequency of ordering at use points is estimated to be sufficient to warrant the making of indefinite quantity requirement contracts;

(3) It is either not feasible to forecast definite requirements for delivery to specific use points (as in the case of new items initially being introduced into a supply system), or no advantage accrues doing so; and

(b) Industry distribution facilities are adequate properly to serve the use points involved; and

(c) Conditions exist where any of the following factors requires the maintaining of indefinite quantity requirements contracts

(1) Advantage to the Government is greater than would be secured by definite quantity procurements by individual offices or agencies (the determining consideration being one of overall economy to the Government, rather than one of direct comparison of unit prices of individual items obtainable through other methods of supply); or no known procurement economies would be effected but the requirements of offices of agencies can best be served by indefinite quantity requirements contracts.

(2) Acute competitive bidding problems exist because of highly technical matters which can best be met on a centralized contracting basis.

(3) The item is proprietary or so complex in design, function, or operation as to be noncompetitive and procurement can best be performed on a centralized contracting basis.

[blocks in formation]

g 101–25.101–5 Supply through local

purchase. The following criteria shall govern in determining whether an item should be supplied through local purchase:

(a) Urgency of need requires local purchase to assure prompt delivery;

The following criteria shall govern in determining whether an item can be most advantageously supplied through

(b) The items are perishable or subject to rapid deterioration which will not permit delay incident to shipment from distant points;

(c) The local purchase is within applicable limitation established by the agency head; or

(d) Local purchase will produce the greatest economy to the Government.

8 101-25.102 Exchange or sale of per

sonal property for replacement pur

poses. Policies and methods governing executive agencies in exercising the authority granted under section 201(c) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended (40 U.S.C. 481(c)), are prescribed in part 101-46.

15, 1981). When an employee receives promotional material, the employee shall accept the material on behalf of the United States and relinquish it to an appropriate agency official.

(b) Promotional coupons that provide for future free or reduced costs of services (travel) should be integrated into the agency travel plans to maximize the benefits to the Government. The coupons should then be applied to the maximum extent possible; e.g., coastto-coast or overseas travel, if permitted.

(c) Promotional coupons that carry a cash surrender value shall be redeemed immediately. The cash received from redeemed coupons or other cash compensation (i.e., denied boarding or cancellation of reservation by carriers, etc.) shall be deposited in accordance with Department of Treasury requirements, and credited to miscellaneous receipt account 1699, “Miscellaneous Dividends and Earnings, Not Otherwise Classified.”

(d) Promotional materials that cannot be used by the receiving agency shall be disposed of in accordance with 8101-25.1034.

(31 FR 4997, Mar. 28, 1966)

8 101-25.103 Promotional materials,

trading stamps, or bonus goods.

8 101-25.103-1 General.

Federal agencies in a position to receive promotional materials, trading stamps, or bonus goods shall establish internal procedures for the receipt and disposition of these gratuities in accordance with $101-25.103. The procedures shall provide for a minimum of administrative and accounting controls.

(48 FR 48232, Oct. 18, 1983]

or

[48 FR 48232, Oct. 18, 1983]

8 101-25.103–2 Promotional material

received in conjunction with official travel from transportation companies, rental car companies, or

other commercial activities. (a) All promotional materials (e.g., bonus flights, reduced-fare coupons, cash, merchandise, gifts, credits toward future free or reduced costs of services or goods, etc.) received by employees in conjunction with official travel and based on the purchase of a ticket or other services (e.g. car rental) are properly considered to be due the Government and may not be retained by the employee. The Comptroller General of the United States has stated that employees are obligated to account for any gift, gratuity, or benefit received from private sources incident to the performance of official duties (see Comp. Gen. Decision B-199656, July

g 101–25.103_3 Trading stamps

bonus goods received from contrac

tors. When contracts contain a price reduction clause, any method (such as trading stamps or bonus goods) by which the price of a commodity or service is effectively reduced shall constitute a price reduction. Temporary or promotional price reductions are to be made available to contracting officers under the same terms and conditions as to other customers. Procuring activities, however, rather than accept trading stamps and bonus goods, shall attempt to deduct the cost of such items from the contract price. If obtaining such a price reduction is not possible, the contracting officer shall document the contract file to that effect and dispose of the items as provided in 8101-25.103.4.

[48 FR 48232, Oct. 18, 1983]

of

8 101-25.103-4 Disposition

promotional materials, trading stamps,

or bonus goods. (a) Agencies shall, through the lowest appropriate activity, arrange for transfer of promotional materials, trading stamps, or bonus goods, without reimbursement in accordance with internal agency procedures to a nearby Federal hospital or similar institution operated, managed, or supervised by the Department of Defense (DOD) or the Veterans Administration (VA) when:

(1) The contract does not contain a price reduction clause, or

(2) The contractor refuses to grant a price reduction, and

(3) It is deemed practical and in the best interest of the Government to accept such promotional items as a price reduction, and

(4) The procuring or receiving agency has no practical use for the promotional items.

(b) Before transferring promotional materials, trading stamps, or bonus goods to the above Federal institutions, it must be determined that the proposed recipient is prepared to receive and use such items. If these items cannot be used by the receiving agency or a medical facility, they should be disposed of in accordance with 41 CFR 101-43, 44 and 45.

with respect to items such as typewriters under Federal Supply Schedule contracts), and the justification for the action shall be fully documented in the agency file:

(1) For essential requirements arising from quantitative increases in onboard employment which constitute the total requirement of any agency or major component thereof (e.g. bureau, service, office).

(2) For essential requirements arising from a need not related to onboard employment increases but which are determined necessary to avoid impairment of program efficiency.

(b) Each agency shall restrict replacement of furniture or office machines either to usable excess, rehabilitated, or the least expensive new lines available which will meet the requirement under the following circumstances, authority for which will meet the requirement under the following circumstances, authority for which shall be fully documented in the agen

cy file:

(1) Where the agency determines that the item is not economically repairable.

(2) Where reductions in office space occupancy are accomplished through use of more convenient or smaller size furniture and the space economies thus achieved offset the cost of the furniture to be acquired.

[48 FR 48232, Oct. 18, 1983]

§ 101–25.104 Acquisition of office fur

niture and office machines.

(30 FR 5479, Apr. 16, 1965, as amended at 42 FR 1031, Jan, 5, 1977)

8 101-25.104–1 Redistribution, repair,

or rehabilitation.

Each executive agency shall make a determination as to whether the requirements of the agency can be met through the utilization of already owned items prior to the acquisition of new furniture or office machines. The acquisition of new items shall be limited to those requirements which are considered absolutely essential and shall not include upgrading to improve appearance, office decor, or status, or to satisfy the desire for the latest design or more expensive lines.

(a) Generally acquisition of additional furniture or office

office machines from any source will be authorized only under the following circumstances, limited to the least expensive lines which will meet the requirement (see $101–26.408 of this chapter

Prior to the purchase of new office furniture and office machines, agencies shall fulfill needs insofar as practicable through redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation of already owned furniture and office machines. In furtherance of the use of rehabilitated furniture and office machines, agencies shall review inventories on a continuing basis to ascertain those items which can be economically rehabilitated and institute programs for their orderly repair and rehabilitation. All such items which are not required for immediate needs shall be reported as excess.

(42 FR 1031, Jan. 5, 1977)

[blocks in formation]

(a) The determination as to whether office machines are to be serviced by use of annual maintenance contracts or per-call arrangements shall be made in each case after comparison of the relative cost affecting specific types of equipment in a particular location and consideration of the factors set forth in paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) Prior to making the determination required by paragraph (a) of this section, consideration shall be given to:

(1) Standard of performance required; (2) Degree of reliability needed;

(3) Environmental factors; i.e., dusty surroundings or other unfavorable conditions;

(4) Proximity to available repair facilities;

(5) Past experience with service facility; i.e., reputation, performance record, quality of work, etc.;

(6) Daily use (heavy or light) and operator's care of machine;

(7) Age and performance record of machine;

(8) Machine inventory in relation to operating needs; i.e., availability of reserve machine in case of breakdown;

(9) Number of machines; including overall frequency of repairs required;

(10) Security restrictions, if any; and (11) Other pertinent factors.

to issue from accountable records and termination of formal accountability. Consumable items, for the purpose of this section, are considered to include those items actually consumed in use (e.g., pads and pencils) and those items required in performance of duties but for which, primarily by reason of the low value involved, no formal accountability is maintained after issue, and are generally referred to as "expendable."

(b) Approval of requisitions for replenishment of cupboard storeroom stocks should be restricted to officials at a responsible supervisory level to ensure that supply requirements are justified on the basis of essentiality and quantity. Where requisitions are not required, such as in obtaining items from GSA customer supply centers, informal "shopping lists” should be approved at the same level.

(c) Adequate safeguards and controls should be established to assure that issues of expendable supplies are made for official use only. In appropriate situations, this will include identification of individuals to whom expendable supplies have been issued. Experience has indicated, also, that certain items of expendables should not be displayed either at seasonal periods of the year or on a permanent basis.

(d) The items listed below have from experience proven to be personally attractive and particularly susceptible to being used for other than official duties. Agencies should give special attention to these and

any

other consumable or low cost items when issues are excessive when compared with normal program needs.

(31 FR 14260, Nov. 4, 1966)

8 101-25.107 Guidelines for requisition

ing and proper use of consumable

or low cost items. Consumable and low value items in inventory (cupboard stocks are not considered inventory) are subject to accounting and inventory record controls in accordance with applicable provisions of law and the principles and standards prescribed by the General Accounting Office, 2 GAO 12.5. Normally, however, the systems of control for such property cease at the time of issuance from a warehouse or storeroom to the consumer.

(a) The guidelines set forth in this $ 101-25.107 are considered minimum to assure proper use of consumable or low cost items by individuals, subsequent

Attache cases, Ball point pers and refills,

Brief cases, Binders, Carbon paper, Dictionaries, Felt tip markers, Felt tip pens and refills, File folders, Letterex, Letter openers, Pads (paper), Paper clips, Pencils, Pencil sharpeners, Portfolios (leather, plastic, and writing pads), Rubber bands, Rulers, Scissors, Spray paint and lacquer, Staplers, Staples, Staple removers, Tape dispensers, Transparent tape, Typewriter ribbons,

(32 FR 4413, Mar. 23, 1967, as amended at 42 FR 1031, Jan. 5, 1977; 51 FR 13498, Apr. 21, 1986)

8 101–25.108 Multiyear subscriptions

for publications. Subscriptions for periodicals, newspapers, and other

and other publications for which it is known in advance that a continuing requirement exists should be for multiple years rather than for a single year where such method is advantageous for the purpose of economy or otherwise. Where various bureaus or offices in the same agency are subscribing to the same publication, consideration shall be given to consolidating these requirements, to the extent practical, on an agency-wide basis and on a multiyear basis. Payment covering issues to be delivered during the entire subscription period may be made in advance from currently available appropriations (31 U.S.C. 530a).

purpose

of identifying idle and unneeded laboratory and research equipment. Following each tour, a report of findings shall be prepared by the inspection team and, as determined by the agency head or his designee, submitted to the head of the laboratory or to a higher agency official having laboratories management responsibility. Equipment identified by the inspection team as idle or unneeded shall be reassigned as needed within the laboratory, placed in an equipment pool, or declared excess and made available to other agencies in accordance with part 101-43.

(c) Laboratory inspection teams shall be comprised of senior program management, property management, and scientific personnel who are familiar with the plans and programs of the laboratory(ies) and who have a knowledge of laboratory and research equipment utilization. As determined by the agency head or his designee, members of an inspection team shall be appointed by either the head of the laboratory or a higher agency official having laboratories management responsibility.

(d) The agency head or his designee shall ensure compliance by responsible personnel with the requirements of this $101–25.109–1 and shall require that periodic independent reviews of walkthrough procedures employed in Federal laboratories under his control be conducted to determine their effectiveness and to effect modifications as ap propriate.

(33 FR i7140, Nov. 19, 1968]

g 101-25.109 Laboratory and research

equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal laboratories. Agencies may establish such additional controls as are appropriate to increase the use of already-owned equipment instead of procuring similar equipment.

(b) The term Federal laboratory, as used in this section, means any laboratory or laboratory facility in any Government-owned or -leased building which is equipped and/or used for scientific research, testing, or analysis, except clinical laboratories operating in direct support of Federal health care programs. To the extent practicable, agencies should observe the provisions of this section with regard to commercial laboratories and laboratory facilities which operate under contract with the Government and use Governmentfurnished equipment.

[43 FR 29004, July 5, 1978]

[43 FR 29004, July 5, 1978]

g 101–25.109_1 Identification of idle

equipment. (a) The provisions of this $101–25.109 1 apply to all Federal laboratories regardless of size.

(b) Inspection tours of Federal laboratories shall be conducted

on scheduled basis, annually, if feasible, but no less than every 2 years, for the

g 101–25.109-2 Equipment pools.

(a) The provisions of this $ 101–25.109 2 apply to Federal laboratories which occupy an area of 10,000 square feet or more and employ 25 or more technical or scientific personnel.

(b) Equipment pools shall be established in Federal laboratories so that laboratory and research equipment can be shared or allocated on a temporary basis to laboratory activities and individuals whose average use does not warrant the assignment of the equip ment on a permanent basis. In determining the number and location of equipment pools, consideration shall be given to economy of operation, mobility of equipment, accessibility to users,

a

« PreviousContinue »