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COOPERATIVE STATE EXPERIMENT STATION

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)
SERVICE-Continued

1962 1963 1964

actual estimate estimate General and special funds-Continued PAYMENTS AND EXPENSES--Continued

Program by activities:

1. Payments to States and Puerto Rico: Object Classification in thousands of dollars)

(a) Payments for cooperative agricul

tural extension work under Smith-
Lever Act...

57,649 61,611 62,820
1962
1963

1964 actual estimate estimate

(b) Payments and contracts under the

Agricultural Marketing Act.... 1,603 1,653 1,605 11 Personnel compensation:

2. Retirement and employees' compensation Permanent positions.--

829

costs for extension agents... 937

6,194

7,110

6,765 1,036 Positions other than permanent.

3. Penalty mail.. 21

2,490 2,801 3,113 22 20 4. Federal Extension Service.

2,437 2,595 2,772 Other personnel compensation -

1

7 Total personnel compensation...

70,374 75,425 77,420 Total program costs, funded 851 959 1,063

46 12 Personnel benefits...

-35 62

-83
Change in selected resources ?
64

72 21 Travel and transportation of persons.

116 125 110

Total obligations 22 Transportation of things..

70,421 75,342 1

77,385 2

2 23 Rent, communications, and utilities.

262 270 328

Financing: 24 Printing and reproduction

23
23

23 25 Other services...

Reimbursements for emergency preparedness
5
5

4
Services of other agencies.
71

-57 75 70

functions (-). Unobligated balance lapsing

384 26 Supplies and materials

19
9

9 31 Equipment.--

17
10
9

New obligational authority 41 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.. 34,724 36,723

70,804 75,342 77,328

38,693 Total obligations

36,151 38,265 40,383

New obligational authority:
Appropriation

70,804 75,344 77,328 Personnel Summary

Transferred to "Salaries and expenses, gen-
eral administration" (76 Stat. 1212) (-)-

-2 Total number of permanent positions.

108 116 117
Appropriation (adjusted)

70,804 75,342 77,328 Full-time equivalent of other positions.

2
2

3 Average number of all employees.

104 113 113 Number of employees at end of year.

103 115 117

1 Includes capital outlay as follows: 1962, $33 thousand; 1963, $17 thousand;

1964, $11 thousand. Average GS grade.

8.9 8.9 . Selected resources as of June 30 are as follows: Average GS salary. $8,102 $8,850 $9,019

1962 ad

1961 justments 1962 1963 1964 Unpaid undelivered orders.

225

210 124 98 Advances.

87 -98 47 50 41 ALLOCATIONS RECEIVED FROM OTHER ACCOUNTS

Total selected resources--

312 -101 257 174 139 Note.-Obligations incurred under allocations from other accounts are included in Funds Appropriated to the President, “Public works acceleration."

The primary function of the nationwide system of cooperative extension work is out-of-school applied educa

tion in agriculture, home economics, and related subjects. EXTENSION SERVICE

This educational work takes research results, technological

advancements, and situation and program facts of the General and special funds:

Department of Agriculture, the State agricultural colleges COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK, PAYMENTS AND EXPENSES and experiment stations, and incorporates them into a Payments to States and Puerto Rico: For payments for coopera

national educational program for action. Its objective is tive agricultural extension work under the Smith-Lever Act, as

to provide farm people and others with information and amended by the Act of June 26, 1953 (7 U.S.C. 341-348), [and] assistance upon which they may make social and economic the Act of August 11, 1955 (7 U.S.C. 347a) [, $62,020,000] and the adjustments necessary for an efficient agricultural industry Act of October 5, 1962 (76 Stal. 745), $63,020,000; and payments and

and improved rural homes and rural life. contracts for such work under section 204(b)-205 of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 (7 U.S.C. 1623–1624), $1,570,000; in

1. Payments to States and Puerto Rico.-Funds are used all, [$63,590,000) $64,590,000: Provided, That funds hereby appro- primarily for the employment of State and county extenpriated pursuant to section 3(c) of the Act of June 26, 1953, shall sion workers who work with rural families, marketing not be paid to any State or Puerto Rico prior to availability of an equal sum from non-Federal sources for expenditure during the

concerns, and others by providing advice and assistance current fiscal year.

in the application of improved methods involved in Retirement and Employees' Compensation costs for extension production, marketing, and family living. They assist agents: For cost of employer's share of Federal retirement and for local leadership to determine extension programs of work. . reimbursement for benefits paid from the Employees' Compensation Fund for cooperative extension employees, [$6,765,000] $7,110,000.

Work with youth is accomplished largely through 4-H Penalty mail: For costs of penalty mail for cooperative extension

Clubs. agents and State extension directors, [$2,490,000] $3,113,000. The proposed increase in payments for cooperative

Federal Extension Service: For administration of the Smith-Lever agricultural extension work would be paid to the States Act, as amended by the Act of June 26, 1953 (7 U.S.C. 341-348), [and] the Act of August 11, 1955 (7 U.S.C. 347a) and the Act of

to provide more effectively for extension work in connecOctober 5, 1962 (76 Stat. 745), and extension aspects of the Agri

tion with the rural areas development program and for cultural Marketing Act of 1946 (7 U.S.C. 1621-1627), and to educational programs in furtherance of the Food and coordinate and provide program leadership for the extension work Agriculture Act of 1962. of the Department and the several States and insular possessions, 2. Retirement and employees' compensation costs for exten[$2,499,500] $2,515,000. (5 U.S.C. 785; 39 U.S.C. 321i, 321n, 321p-; Department of Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropria- sion agents.The increase proposed is required to meet tion Act, 1963.)

these costs for cooperative extension agents. The manda

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tory retirement contribution is authorized under 70 Stat. 747-748. The employer's contribution to the Federal retirement fund, to match contributions of these agents, is provided by this Federal appropriation. The proposed increase in payments to States and Puerto Rico will result in an increase in the required employer's Federal contribution to the retirement fund. The increase proposed will provide for the increased costs. The increase also provides an amount equal to the benefits received by the cooperative agents to be paid to the Employees' Compensation Fund, as required by 5 U.S.C. 785.

3. Penalty mail.-Funds to cover the cost of penalty mailings for State extension directors and cooperative extension agents in the States are provided under this appropriation. The increase provides for increased postal costs pursuant to Public Law 87-793.

4. Federal Extension Service.---The Federal Extension Service provides leadership, counsel, and assistance to the States and Puerto Rico in developing extension programs, improved teaching methods, efficient use of available resources, evaluation of programs, in-service training for extension personnel, and administrative services. The Federal Extension Service also coordinates the educational activities of other U.S. Department of Agriculture agencies. The proposed increase would provide for special emphasis on educational support to the States on poultry marketing and dairy utilization and for increased pay and postal costs pursuant to Public Law 87-793.

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

Program by activities: 1. Cooperation with the Bureau of Indian

Affairs on extension program with

Indians... 2. Assistance to agricultural stabilization and

conservation committees and the Commodity Credit Corporation loan pro

gram in Alaska 3. To carry out Extension Service responsi

bilities and authorities delegated under Area Redevelopment Act (Department

of Commerce) 4. Cooperation with Department of Defense

on extension program work in Rural Defense Information and Education

program --5. Miscellaneous services to other accounts...

Total program costs, funded 1 Change in selected resources

Total obligations

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For necessary expenses to carry out the Act of July 2, 1926 (7 U.S.C. 451-457), ($682,000] and for conducting research relating to the economic and marketing aspects of farmer cooperatives, as authorized by the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 (7 U.S.C. 1621-1627), $1,280,000. (Department of Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1963.)

Note.-Includes $452 thousand for activities previously carried under the fol. lowing appropriations:

"Marketing research and service," Agricultural Marketing Service, $123 thousand.

"Salaries and expenses," Economic Research Service. $329 thousand. The amounts obligated in 1962 and 1963 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

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ALLOCATIONS RECEIVED FROM OTHER ACCOUN

Financing:
Comparative transfers from other accounts

(-).
Unobligated balance lapsing-

Note.--Obligations incurred under allocations from other accour in the schedules of the parent appropriation, Funds Appropriatec dent, "Agency for International Development."

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Program by activities: 1. Research and technical assistance for

farmers cooperatives.. 2. Area Redevelopment Act, Department of

Commerce:

(a) Technical assistance.
(b) Operations....

Total program costs, funded...Change in selected resources 1.

7 10

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The Farmer Cooperative Service provides research, advisory, and educational assistance to farmers' marketing, purchasing, and service cooperatives. Attention is directed to problems of organization, financing, policies, management, membership, marketing, purchasing, transportation, warehousing, costs, and efficiency. Much of this work is carried on in cooperation with land-grant colleges, the Extension Service, and other Federal and State agencies. Research financed by advances from the Agricultural Marketing Service and the Economic Research Service in 1963 and prior years will be financed by direct appropriation to the Farmer Cooperative Service in 1964.

The proposed 1964 increase will enable the Farmer Cooperative Service to better help farmers meet their economic needs through their own business organizations.

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

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New obligational authority:

Appropriation Transferred to (-)"Operating expenses, Public Buildings

Service," General Services Administra.

tion (76 Stat. 728)... "Salaries and expenses, general adminis

tration" (76 Stat. 1212)---

Appropriation (adjusted).
Proposed supplemental due to pay

increases..

-79

The Service is responsible for various soil and water conservation activities to aid farmers, ranchers, and other landowners in making physical adjustments in land use to conserve soil, water, and plant resources, establish a permanent and balanced agriculture, and reduce the hazards of floods and sedimentation. These activities are carried out in cooperation with Federal and State agencies and local sponsoring organizations. The Service also has responsibility for administering the Great Plains conserva tion program, provides technical leadership in resource conservation and development, and furnishes technical services in connection with the agricultural conservation program, and the soil and water conservation loans made by the Farmers Home Administration.

-55

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129

1 Includes capital outlay as follows: June 30, 1962, $2,719 thousand; 1963, $2,800 thousand; 1964, $2,800 thousand. * Selected resources as of June 30 are as follows:

1962

adjust

1961 ments 1962 1963 1964 Stores.

131 131 131 Unpaid undelivered orders.... 1,187 -6 1,164 1,164 1,164

Total selected resources. 1, 316 -6 1,295 1,295 1,295 Assistance furnished to soil conservation districts and other cooperators consists primarily of: (a) standard soil surveys and special soil investigations to provide physical land facts needed for farm and ranch conservation planning and the application of planned practices, and for use by other Federal, State, and local agencies and the public;

MAIN WORKLOAD FACTORS
(In millions of acres)

Total as
1962 of June 1963

actual actual 30, 1962 estimate
Standard soil surveys:
New mapping--

43.5 40.3

42.0 43.0 Conversion from conservation surveys...

7.0 14.8

15.0 15.0 Totals...

50.5 55.1 400.8 57.0 58.0 Conservation surveys.

5.2 5.0 339.5 5.0 5.0 Total soil surveys...--

55.7 60.1 740.3 62.0 63.0

1961

General and special funds:

CONSERVATION OPERATIONS For necessary expenses for carrying out the provisions of the Act of April 27, 1935 (16 U.S.C. 590a-590f), including preparation of conservation plans and establishment of measures to conserve soil and water (including farm irrigation and land drainage and such special measures as may be necessary to prevent floods and the siltation of reservoirs); operation of conservation nurseries; classification and mapping of soils; dissemination of information; purchase and erection or alteration of permanent buildings; and operation and maintenance of aircraft, ($90,705,500] $99,453,00C: Provided, That the cost of any permanent building purchased, erected, or as improved, exclusive of the cost of constructing a water supply or sanitary system and connecting the same to any such building and with the exception of buildings acquired in conjunction with land being purchased for other purposes, shall not exceed $2,500, except for one building to be constructed at a cost not to exceed $25,000 and eight buildings to be constructed or improved at a cost not to exceed $15,000 per building and except that alterations or improvements to other existing permanent buildings costing $2,500 or more may be made in any fiscal year in an amount not to exceed $500 per building: Provided further, That no part of this appropriation shall be available for the construction of any such building on land not owned by the Government: Provided further, That no part of this appropriation may be expended for soil and water conservation operations under the Act of April 27, 1935 (16 U.S.C. 590a-590f), in demonstration projects: Provided further, That not to exceed $5,000 may be used for employment pursuant to the second sentence of section 706(a) of the Organic Act of 1944 (5 U.S.C. 574), as amended by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U.S.C. 55a): Provided further, That qualified local engineers may be temporarily employed at per diem rates to perform the technical planning work of the service. (5 U.S.C. 511-512, 565a; 7 U.S.C. 1887, 1807; 16 U.S.C. 5904-1; Department of Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1963.)

1964 estimate

(b) technical assistance to farmers and ranchers in planning of individual conservation programs for orderly land use adjustments and combinations of conservation treatments; (c) technical assistance and management consultation with installation of those practices and combinations of practices provided for in their farm and ranch conservation plans;

MAIN WORKLOAD FACTORS
1961

1962 1963 1964 Total number

actual actual estimate estimate Soil Conservation Districts.. 2,900 2,929 2,952 2,982 District cooperators (cumulative)

1.887,091 1,944,054 1,986,000 2,016,000 Basic conservation plans and

revisions (annually): Number..

131,248 126,879 135,000 150.000 Acres...

52,121,598 49,069,641 52,730,000 55,000,000 Basic plans (cumulative) - 1,358,290 1,408,662 1,458,000 1,513,000 Landowners and operators assisted.

1,037,803 1,016, 103 1,060,000 1,075,000

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SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE-Continued

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)-Continued

General and special funds-Continued

1962
1963

1964

actual estimate estimate CONSERVATION OPERATIONS—Continued

Deduct quarters and subsistence charges.----

6
7

7 (d) technical assistance to group enterprises with water control problems that can best be solved through group Total obligations

88,906 94,146 99,453 action; (e) the granting of special equipment acquired from Federal Government surplus to soil conservation

Personnel Summary districts for use in the application of planned conservation practices; (f) water supply forecasts developed from snow Total number of permanent positions.

12,281 12,305 12,500 surveys in Western States which serve as a basis for Full-time equivalent of other positions..

685 617 702 planning for efficient seasonal use of water; (g) the selec

Average number of all employees.

11,070 11,095 11,340 tion and testing of plant materials to determine their

Number of employees at end of year

13,502 13,426 13,700 Average GS grade

7.4 7.5 7.5 suitability for erosion control purposes; (h) technical Average GS salary.

$6,307 $6,731 $6,729 assistance to Agricultural Conservation Program participants in establishing specified conservation practices; (i) technical assistance to participants in other programs involving specified conservation practices and land use

WATERSHED PROTECTION adjustments; (j) technical assistance in planning and For expenses necessary to conduct surveys, investigations, and applying the soil and water conservation practices for research and to carry out preventive measures, including, but not which loans are made by the Farmers Home Adminis

limited to, engineering operations, methods of cultivation, the

growing of vegetation, and changes in use of land, in accordance tration; and (k) consultation and assistance to local rural

with the Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act, approved areas development committees, program planning and August 4, 1954, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1001-1008), and the proconsultation in urban fringe areas.

visions of the Act of April 27, 1935 (16_U.S.C. 590a-f), to remain Combinations of needed soil and water conservation

available until expended, [$60,585,000] $63,992,000, with which

shall be merged the unexpended balances of funds heretofore appropractices are planned together and in relation to each

priated or transferred to the Department for watershed protection other so as to have a well balanced program in each purposes: Provided, That not to exceed $100,000 may be used for district and for each farm. Both vegetative and struc

employment pursuant to the second sentence of section 706(a) of tural practices are used in accordance with the conserva

the Organic Act of 1944 (5 U.S.C. 574), as amended by section 15

of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U.S.C. 55a): Provided further, That tion needs of the land and decisions of the cooperating not to exceed $3,000,000 together with the unobligated balance of farmer or rancher. The Soil Conservation Service tech funds previously appropriated for loans and related expense, shall nician explains the soil conditions, develops land use and be available for such purposes. (5 U.S.C. 511-512; 76 Stat. 608-610; treatment alternatives with each cooperator, helps him

Department of Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriation Act,

1963.) evaluate the costs and returns of conservation farming,

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars) and furnishes assistance in applying the needed treat

1962 1963 1964 ments. These conservation programs provide immediate

actual estimate estimate and long-term benefits to the land where installed and to the general welfare. Modern soil and water conservation Program by activities: practices are essential to our continued efficient use of our

1. Small watershed project investigations and
planning -----

5, 462 5,709 5,892 fixed land base for agricultural purposes as the future 2. Watershed works of improvement.

32,097
44,431

44,546 needs of the nation may require. There is an urgent

3. Loans and related expense.

2,326 4,387 2,800

4. River basin program development and need to speed up the rate of applying land treatment work coordination

963 2,043 3,554 as estimated above to prevent further soil deterioration

Total program costs, funded 1

40,849 56,570 and to protect our remaining good land while using and

56,792 Change in selected resources

10,504 9,759 7,200 improving it.

Total obligations.----

51,353 66,329 63,992 Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

Financing:

Unobligated balance brought forward (-)--- -2,512 -4,911 actual estimate estimate Unobligated balance carried forward..

4,911 11 Personnel compensation:

New obligational authority.--

53,752 61,418 63,992 Permanent positions

67,072 71,795 75,960 Positions other than permanent..

2,561 2,392 2,790 Other personnel compensation..

257 226 244

New obligational authority:
Appropriation...

53,787 60,585 63,992 Total personnel compensation

69,890 74,413 78,994 Transferred to "Operating expenses, Public 12 Personnel benefits...

5,463 5,896 6,280 Buildings Service," General Services Ad21 Travel and transportation of persons 2,607 2,713 2,775 ministration (75 Stat. 353) (-) -----

-35 22 Transportation of things

573 572 585 23 Rent, communications, and utilities. 2,908 3,074 3,189 Appropriation (adjusted)

53, 752 60,585 63,992 24 Printing and reproduction...

430 520 532

Proposed supplemental due to pay 25 Other services..

1,219 1,421 1,452
increases.

833 Services of other agencies.

293 269 274 26 Supplies and materials.

3,278 3,132 3,264 31 Equipment..

1 Includes capital outlay as follows: 1962. $799 thousand; 1963, $850 thousand; 2,227 2,072 2,115

1964, $900 thousand. 32 Lands and structures.

8
65

? Selected resources as of June 30 are as follows: 42 Insurance claims and indemnities.

16
2

1961 1962 1963 1964 44 Refunds...

4
Unpaid undelivered orders.

24,713 35, 227 44,986 52, 186 Advances ---

24

14 Subtotal... 88,912 94,153 99, 460

Total selected resources.

24,737 35, 241 45,000 52, 200

2

1962

1963

1964

14

14

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