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42 187

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6.7 $5,755

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739

825

890

Total number of permanent positions..
Full-time equivalent of other positions.
Average number of all employees.--
Number of employees at end of year.
Average GS grade..
Average GS salary..
Average grade, grades established by the For-

eign Service Act of 1946, as amended (22 U.S.C. 801-1158):

Foreign Service Reserve officers..

Foreign Service Staff... Average salary, grades established by the For

eign Service Act of 1946, as amended (22 U.S.C. 801-1158):

Foreign Service Reserve officers..
Foreign Service Staff..
Average salary of ungraded positions..

Personnel Summary

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Total number of permanent positions.
Full-time equivalent of other positions.
Average number of all employees ..
Number of employees at end of year.
Average GS grade..
Average GS salary
Average grade established by the Foreign

Service
Act of 1946, as amended (22 U.S.C. 801-

1158): Foreign Service officers....

Foreign Service Reserve officers -Average salary, grades established by the For

eign Service Act of 1946, as amended (22

U.S.C. 801-1158):
Foreign Service officers..
Foreign Service Reserve officers..

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GENERAL PROVISIONS [SEC. 101. None of the funds herein appropriated (other than funds appropriated under the authorization for "International organizations and programs") shall be used to finance the construction of any new flood control, reclamation, or other water or related land resource project or program which has not met the standards and criteria used in determining the feasibility of flood control, reclamation and other water and related land resource programs and projects proposed for construction within the United States of America as per memorandum of the President dated May 15, 1962.]

[Sec. 102. Obligations made from funds herein appropriated for engineering and architectural fees and services to any individual or group of engineering and architectural firms on any one project in excess of $25,000 shall be reported to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and House of Representatives at least twice annually.]

[Sec. 103. Except for the appropriations entitled “Contingency fund” and “Development loans”, not more than 20 per centum of any appropriation item made available by this title shall be obligated and/or reserved during the last month of availability.]

[Sec. 104. None of the funds herein appropriated nor any of the counterpart funds generated as a result of assistance hereunder or any prior Act shall be used to pay pensions, annuities, retirement pay or adjusted service compensation for any persons heretofore or hereafter serving in the armed forces of any recipient country.]

[SEC. 105. The Congress hereby reiterates its opposition to the seating in the United Nations of the Communist China regime as the representative of China, and it is hereby declared to be the continuing sense of the Congress that the Communist regime in China has not demonstrated its willingness to fulfill the obligations contained in the Charter of the United Nations and should not be recognized to represent China in the United Nations. In the event of the seating of representatives of the Chinese Communist regime in the Security Council or General Assembly of the United Nations the President is requested to inform the Congress insofar as is compatible with the requirements of national security, of the implications of this action upon the foreign policy of the United States and our foreign relationships, including that created by membership in the United Nations, together with any recommendations which he may have with respect to the matter.)

[SEC. 106. It is the sense of Congress that any attempt by foreign nations to create distinctions because of their race or religion among American citizens in the granting of personal or commercial access or any other rights otherwise available to United States citizens generally is repugnant to our principles; and in all negotiations between the United States and any foreign state arising as a result of funds appropriated under this title these principles shall be applied as the President may determine.]

[Sec. 107. (a) No assistance shall be furnished to any country which sells, furnishes, or permits any ships under its registry to carry to Cuba, so long as it is governed by the Castro regime, under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, any arms, ammunition,

6,293

8,383

7,025

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GENERAL PROVISIONS-Continued

Sec. [115] 101. Foreign currencies not to exceed $200,000, made

available for loans pursuant to section 104(e) of the Agricultural implements of war, atomic energy materials, or any articles, mate Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended, shall rials, or supplies, such as petroleum, transportation materials of

be available during the current fiscal year for expenses incurred strategic value, and items of primary strategic significance used in

incident to such loans. the production of arms, ammunition, and implements of war, con

SEC. 102. United States dollars directly paid to the United States tained on the list maintained by the Administrator pursuant to title I

under the Agreement between the United States of America and Japan of the Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951, as amended.] regarding the Settlement of Postwar Economic Assistance to Japan are [(b) No economic assistance shall be furnished to any country

hereby appropriated, as authorized by section 618 of the Foreign which sells, furnishes, or permits any ships under its registry to Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, for the same general purposes as carry items of economic assistance to Cuba so long as it is governed

are set forth in any of the subparagraphs under "Economic Assistance" by the Castro regime, under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as

in this Act except the subparagraph entitled "Administrative expenses", amended, unless the President determines that the withholding of

to the extent such dollars are available: Provided, That the total amount such assistance would be contrary to the national interest and so appropriated for each such general purpose shall not be increased by reports such determination to the Foreign Relations and Appropria the provisions of this section. tions Committees of the Senate and the Foreign Affairs and Appro

[SEC. 601. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act priations Committees of the House of Representatives. Reports

shall be used for publicity or propaganda purposes within the made pursuant to this subsection shall be published in the Federal

United States not heretofore authorized by the Congress.] Register within seven days of submission to the committees and

[SEC. 602. None of the funds herein appropriated shall be used shall contain a statement by the President of the reasons for such

for expenses of the Inspector General, Foreign Assistance, after the determination.]

expiration of the thirty-five day period which begins on the date the [Sec. 108. Any obligation made from funds provided in this title

General Accounting Office or any committee of the Congress, or any for procurement outside the United States of any commodity in bulk

duly authorized subcommittee thereof, charged with considering and in excess of $100,000 shall be reported to the Committees on

foreign assistance legislation, appropriations, or expenditures, has Appropriations of the Senate and the House of Representatives at

delivered to the office of the Inspector General, Foreign Assistance, least twice annually: Provided, That each such report shall state the

a written request that it be furnished any document, paper, comreasons for which the President determined, pursuant to criteria set

munication, audit, review, finding, recommendation, report, or forth in section 604(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as

other material in the custody or control of the Inspector General, amended, that foreign procurement will not adversely affect the

Foreign Assistance relating to any review, inspection, or audit economy of the United States.]

arranged for, directed, or conducted by him, unless and until there [Sec. 109. (a) No assistance shall be furnished to any nation,

has been furnished to the General Accounting Office or to such comwhose government is based upon that theory of government known as

mittee or subcommittee, as the case may be, (A) the document, Communism under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended,

paper, communication, audit, review, finding, recommendation, refor any arms, ammunition, implements of war, atomic energy

port, or other material so requested or (B) a certification by the materials, or any articles, materials, or supplies, such as petroleum,

President, personally, that he has forbidden the furnishing thereof transportation materials of strategic value, and items of primary

pursuant to such request and his reason for so doing. ] strategic significance used in the production of arms, ammunition, and implements of war, contained on the list maintained by the Administrator pursuant to title I of the Mutual Defense Assistance

INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Control Act of 1951, as amended.]

General and special funds: [(b) No economic assistance shall be furnished to any nation whose government is based upon that theory of government known as INVESTMENT IN INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK Communism under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (except section 214(b)), unless the President determines that the For payment of subscriptions to the Inter-American Development withholding of such assistance would be contrary to the national Bank [to remain available until expended, $60,000,000 for the interest and reports such determination to the Foreign Affairs and third installment on paid-in capital stock.) for expansion of the Appropriations Committees of the House of Representatives and Fund for Special Operations, $50,000,000, to remain available until Foreign Relations and Appropriations Committees of the Senate. expended. (73 Stat. 299; Foreign Aid and Related Agencies ApproReports made pursuant to this subsection shall be published in the priation Act, 1963.) Federal Register within seven days of submission to the committees and shall contain a statement by the President of the reasons for

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars) such determination.] [Sec. 110. None of the funds appropriated or made available

1964

actual estimate pursuant to this Act for carrying out the Foreign Assistance Act of

estimate 1961, as amended, may be used for making payments on any contract for procurement to which the United States is a party entered Program by activities: into after the date of enactment of this Act which does not contain a Investment in Inter-American Development provision authorizing the termination of such contract for the con Bank (costs-obligations) (object class 33). 110,000 60,000 50,000 venience of the United States.]

[Sec. 111. None of the funds appropriated or made available Financing: under this Act for carrying out the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, Unobligated balance brought forward (-) ---200,000-200.000-200,000 as amended, may be used to make payments with respect to any Unobligated balance carried forward...-- 200,000 200,000 200,000 contract for the performance of services outside the United States by United States citizens where such citizens have not been investigated New obligational authority (appropriation) - 110,000 60,000 50,000 for loyalty and security in the same manner and to the same extent as would apply if they were regularly employed by the United States.)

Public Law 86–147 (73 Stat. 299), approved August 7, [Sec. 112. None of the funds appropriated or made available 1959, provided for membership of the United States in the under this Act for carrying out the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, may be used to make payments with respect to any capital

Inter-American Development Bank, and authorized an project financed by loans or grants from the United States where the appropriation of $450 million as the initial U.S. subscripUnited States has not directly approved the terms of the contracts tion. The Bank is an institution sponsored by the nations and the firms to provide engineering, procurement, and construction of the Organization of American States and is designed services on such project.]

to accelerate the economic development of the American Of | to this Act not more than $6,000,000 may be used during the fiscal republics by providing capital and technical assistance year ending June 30, 1963, in carrying out section 241 of the Foreign and by encouraging private investment in development Assistance Act of 1961, as amended.]

projects. [Sec, 114. None of the funds appropriated or made available The U.S. subscription consists of three parts. The pursuant to this Act for carrying out the Foreign Assistance Act of first is a subscription of $150 million for paid-in shares of 1961, as amended, may be used to pay in whole or in part, any capital stock, payable in three installments. The first assessments, arrearages or dues of any member of the United Nations.]

installment of $30 million was paid in June 1960; the

1962

1963

second and third installments of $60 million each were Public Law 86-565 (74 Stat. 293), approved June 30, paid in October 1961 and October 1962, respectively. The 1960, authorized membership of the United States in the second part is $200 million of callable capital stock which International Development Association and authorized can be called only to meet obligations of the Bank on $320.3 million to be appropriated for subscription to the securities which it has issued in the private financial Association. market or on loans which it has guaranteed. Funds were The International Development Association is an appropriated for this purpose in 1960. Third is a sub-affiliate of the International Bank which provides developscription of $100 million in the Fund for Special Opera- ment financing on flexible terms to less developed member tions of the Bank. Fifty million dollars of this was paid countries. Most of its initial resources are being provided in June 1960, and the other $50 million in October 1961. by countries other than the United States including $443

The present request is made in conjunction with the million from other economically advanced countries. proposal of new authorization of a U.S. subscription to Total subscriptions, including those of the less developed expand and restore the liquidity of the Fund for Special countries, are scheduled at $1 billion of which the U.S. Operations.

portion is about 32% of this total.

Subscriptions are to be paid by the members in five

annual installments, beginning in 1961. The $61.7 million INVESTMENT IN INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND herein requested is for the fourth payment in this series. DEVELOPMENT

The first installment of $73.7 million was paid in 1961; Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

the second and third installments of $61.7 million each were paid in 1962 and 1963. Additional installments of

$61.7 million each are planned for payment in 1964 and estimate

1965.

As of June 30, 1962, the Association had made credit Financing:

commitments totalling $235 million in 11 countries and Unobligated balance brought forward (authorization to expend from

territories. Upon completion of negotiations with other public debt receipts) (-)... -5,715,000 -5,715,000 -5,715,000 countries, authorization for replenishment of the AssociUnobligated balance carried forward

ation's resources will be requested in 1964, though appro(authorization to expend from public debt receipts). 5,715,000 5,715,000 5,715,000

priations of newly authorized funds will not be necessary until 1966.

1963

1962 actual

1964 estimate

The Bretton Woods Agreements Act of July 31, 1945,

LOANS TO THE INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND authorized the acceptance of membership in the Inter

[For loans to the International Monetary Fund, as authorized by national Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the Act of June 19, 1962 (Public Law 87-490), $2,000,000,000, to the subscription of $3,175 million to its capital stock. On remain available until expended. The indefinite appropriation for June 17, 1959 (73 Stat. 80), the Bretton Woods Agreement

the payment of interest on the public debt (31 U.S.C. 711), shall be Act was amended to increase the U.S. subscription to

available for the payment of charges in connection with any pur

chases of currencies or gold by the United States from the Internacallable capital stock by $3,175 million, in connection tional Monetary Fund.] (76 Stat. 105; Foreign Aid and Related with the approximate doubling of the Bank's authorized Agencies Appropriation Act, 1963.) capital to its present level of $21 billion, of which $20.5 has been subscribed.

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)
The United States paid $635 million of the original

1962
1963

1964

actual estimate estimate subscription in cash and non-interest-bearing nonnegotiable notes. The remaining balance of obligational au Financing: thority ($5,715 million) will not be called unless required

Unobligated balance brought for

forward (-). to meet the Bank's obligations. Calls on unpaid sub

-2,000,000 Unobligated balance carried forward..

2,000,000 2,000,000 scriptions must be a uniform percentage of the amounts subscribed by each member country.

New obligational authority (apBy the end of June 1962, the Bank had made net loans

propriation).

2,000,000 totalling $6.5 billion in 60 member countries and territories.

Public Law 87-490 authorized an appropriation of $2

billion to complete action requisite for the United States to SUBSCRIPTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

adhere to a Decision of the Executive Directors of the

International Monetary Fund of January 5, 1962. Public For payment of the [third] fourth installment of the subscription Law 87–872 contained the necessary appropriation, and of the United States to the International Development Association, on October 24, 1962, the United States formally deposited $61,656,000, to remain available until expended. (74 Stat. 293; Foreign Aid and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1963.)

an instrument "setting forth that it has adhered in accord

ance with its law and has taken all steps necessary to enProgram and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

able it to carry out the terms and conditions” of the Decision. U.S. action brought into effect a ten-nation, $6

billion arrangement providing, under specified conditions, actual estimate estimate

for loans by the participants to the Fund to forestall or Program by activities:

cope with an impairment of the international monetary Investment in International Development

system. The United States is now in a position to lend Association (costs--obligations) (object

up to $2 billion to the Fund, but would not be expected to class 33)

61,656 61,656 61,656

do so in the absence of a substantial improvement in its Financing:

balance of payments position. No loan is presently conNew obligational authority (appropriation)... 61,656 61,656 61,656 templated, nor is such a loan likely under present con

ditions.

1962

1963

1964

PEACE CORPS

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General and special funds:

PEACE CORPS For expenses necessary to enable the President to carry out the provisions of the Peace Corps Act (75 Stat. 612), as amended, including purchase of not to exceed [ten] five passenger motor vehicles for use outside the United States, [$59,000,000] $108,000,000, of which not to exceed [$15,500,000] $20,500,000 shall be available for administration and program support costs. (Foreign Aid and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1963; additional authorizing legislation to be proposed.)

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

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1 Estimated net figures after training.

. Includes 484 replacements in continuing programs of volunteers who will have completed their 2-year term of service by Aug. 31.

* Includes 3,094 replacements in continuing, programs of volunteers who will have completed their 2-year term of service during the period Aug. 31, 1963, to Aug. 31, 1964.

The rate of increase of countries in which the Peace Corps program has been or will be initiated in 1962 and 1963 is not applicable to 1964. It is assumed that during 1963, programs will have been developed for the majority of countries in which the Peace Corps at present has a potential for service.

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New obligational authority

30,000 58,550 108,000 Requests for Peace Corps assistance in new countries

and for new activities in countries in which volunteers New obligational authority:

are already working continue to mount. For 1964 it is Appropriation..

30,000 59,000 108,000 anticipated that in all countries in which the Peace Corps Transferred to "Operating expenses, Public

is operating, there will be a continuing demand for volunBuildings Service," General Services Ad

teers. Most countries are requesting an increasing numministration (76 Stat. 728)

-450

ber to serve in fields of activity to which volunteers already Appropriation (adjusted).

30,000 58,550

108,000 are contributing their skills as well as in new fields of

activity. The proposed 1964 program by region is as

follows: 1. Volunteer and project costs. The purpose of the Africa, 3,750 volunteers.-On August 31, 1962, 1,110 Peace Corps is to provide skilled Americans to interested volunteers were training for or working in 13 African countries in need of manpower, and, in the course of countries: Cameroon, Ethiopia, Ghana, Ivory Coast, meeting this need, to promote understanding between the Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somali people of the United States and the people served. Republic, Tanganyika, Togo, and Tunisia. By far the Americans serving in the Peace Corps are selected initially largest number were engaged in teaching. Since that to insure that they possess the skills and the personal date, volunteers have commenced training for or are characteristics and abilities to achieve both these ends. working in Morocco, Nyasaland, and Gabon. Continued The intensive training they receive is designed to develop expansion of these programs will occur throughout 1963. these attributes, to provide them with knowledge of the For 1964 it is foreseen that programs will continue in countries to which they go and the languages of those all African countries where the Peace Corps volunteers countries, and to allow an opportunity for further careful will be working on August 31, 1963. The increase of selection based on day-to-day observation.

1,000 volunteers anticipated between that date and August Peace Corps volunteers engage in activities at the 31, 1964, will be largely the result of the initiation of new request of the host countries. Their placement is jointly activities in old countries and of expansion of present planned by officials of the country and Peace Corps staff. activities in those countries. To the maximum extent possible, relatively large numbers Far East, 1,750 volunteers. At the end of 1962, 799 of volunteers-40 or more

of similar or complementary volunteers were in training for or at work in projects in skills are involved in any one country program. Maxi- Malaya, the Philippines, North Borneo Sarawak, and mum association with the people of the host country is Thailand. These programs are in the fields of health, insured by planning the placement of volunteers in small education, and rural community action, but they are disgroups throughout a region or country, and by the fact tinguished by an emphasis on physical education and that, in most cases, they work for an indigenous national English teaching, particularly at the elementary level. organization. For most purposes, volunteers are responsi The Peace Corps Far East program for 1963 includes ble to host country nationals in their jobs, although the expansion of programs in these countries and the iniPeace Corps staff representatives in each country super tiation of a program in Indonesia. The 1964 program for vise their progress closely.

the Far East will involve mainly the replacement of volPeace Corps planning and budgeting are based upon unteers completing their 2-year term of service. a "program year” which runs from the beginning of Latin America, 6,150 volunteers.-On August 31, 1962, September through the end of the following August. On 1,230 volunteers were in training for or working in 13 August 31, 1961, 484 volunteers were in training for or Latin American countries. The greatest expressed need serving in eight countries. On August 31, 1962, 3,578 in terms of manpower in Latin America is for middle-level volunteers were in training for or working in 38 countries. workers in agriculture and rural and urban community A total of approximately 9,000 volunteers in 51 countries work. Consequently, the majority of volunteers are is projected for August 31, 1963, and 13,000 for August 31, training for or are engaged in agricultural extension and 1964. Regional totals for these dates are:

rural and community action programs.

1962

1963

1964 estimate

In 1963 the number of volunteers is increasing substan

Personnel Summary tially as activities have been initiated in seven new countries and are expanded in many countries with programs already underway. Training will also begin for

actual estimate replacement of volunteers in three countries, whose terms of service will be completed.

Total number of permanent positions..

448 931 1,076 In 1964 the Latin American program will double in size Americans

407 806 926 as new and expanded country programs are undertaken Locals..

41 125 150 primarily in the fields of agriculture and community action. Latin American nations working under the Alliance Average number of all employees...

Full-time equivalent of other positions.

134 123 175

409 922 1,215 for Progress are finding in Peace Corps volunteers a timely Number of employees at end of year.

784 1,051 1,251 and effective adjunct to their social progress and develop- Average GS grade

8.4 8.1 8.0 ment programs. This underlies the rapidly increasing Average GS salary.

$7,021 $7,136 $7,206 demands for volunteers in this region,

Average grade, grades established by the For

eign Service Act of 1946, as amended Near East/South Asia, 1,350 volunteers.-On August 31, (22 U.S.C. 801–1158): 1962, 439 Peace Corps volunteers were in training or Foreign Service Reserve.

3.5 4.0 4.0 overseas for projects in eight countries: India, Pakistan,

Foreign Service Staff..

7.9 7.7 7.6 Afghanistan, Ceylon, Cyprus, Nepal, Turkey, and Iran | Average salary, grades established by the

Foreign Service Act of 1946, as amended The 1963 program is characterized chiefly by the ex (22 U.S.C. 801-1158): pansion of these programs. Probably its most striking Foreign Service Reserve.

$12,242 $12,057 $12,082 feature is the anticipated rapid expansion of the Pakistan

Foreign Service Staff..

$5,397 $5,662 $5,604 program during the summer of 1963, principally in the

Average grade, positions established by the
Director, Peace Corps..

16.1 15.9 15.9 fields of irrigation and water desalinization.

Average salary, positions established by the In keeping with the emphasis on growth in Latin Amer Director, Peace Corps ---

$16,064 $17,236 $17,236 ica and Africa during 1964, the Near East/South Asia

Average salary of ungraded positions

$1,598 $1,465 $1,455 program during that period will consist almost exclusively of the replacement of volunteers completing their term of service in on-going programs.

2. Administration and program support.-—This activity provides for all Peace Corps expenses except those which

Intragovernmental funds: are directly related to volunteer and project costs. In

ADVANCES AND REIMBURSEMENTS Washington, it includes policy and program direction; program planning, development, and evaluation; direction

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars) of the recruitment, training, and selection of volunteers; procurement; financial, administrative, and management

actual estimate estimate services; direction of the medical program; and research. Overseas it includes program management; medical sup

Program by activities: port; and all financial, administrative, and management Salaries and expenses, Peace Corps, Executive services.

(obligations)

8

75 30 The ratio of administration and program support costs to total requirements continues to decline. For 1962,

Financing:

Advances and reimbursements from other 1963, and 1964 these ratios are 33%, 26%, and 19%,

accounts.

75

30 respectively. Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

1962

1963

1964

8

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