Page images
PDF
EPUB

EASTERN EUROPEAN ANALYSES. June 16, 1943-May 3, 1944. 2 in.

Reports that contain biweekly surveys of Soviet radio and press transmissions. By October 6, 1943, this issuance (originally entitled Radio Moscow Review) also included coverage of Nazi-occupied territory in Eastern Europe. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-24).

EASTERN EUROPEAN WEEKLY SURVEYS. May 20-Dec. 20, 1944. 2 in. 40

Reports that present in less detail the types of material contained in the Eastern European Analysis, to which the Eastern European Weekly Survey was the successor. This issuance was originally entitled the Eastern European Survey; finally it became the North and East European Survey, which included an analysis of transmissions from Scandinavian countries. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-24).

SOUTHERN EUROPEAN ANALYSES. Sept. 24, 1943-Apr. 20, 1944. 5 in. 41

Reports that contain weekly analyses of radio and press propaganda covering, at various periods, Italy, the Vatican, the Balkans, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Rumania. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-31).

SOUTHERN EUROPEAN WEEKLY SURVEYS. Aug. 19-Dec. 27, 19214. 2 in. 42

Reports that present the types of material contained in the Southern European Analysis, to which the Southern European Weekly Survey was apparently the successor. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-15). Two unnumbered issues of April 27 and May 4, 1944, are filed at the beginning of the series.

SUGGESTIONS FOR OVERSEAS PROPAGANDA. Aug. 15-Dec. 19, 1942.

2 in.

Reports that contain weekly analyses of information in foreign broadcasts which could be useful to officials concerned with overseas propaganda. For the most part they were prepared for the Overseas Branch of the Office of War Information as material for broadcasts directed to Germany, German-dominated Europe, France, Italy, Sweden, and the Far East. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-19). EXPOSES OF ENEMY RADIO BLUNDERS. Aug. 29-Oct. 2), 191,2. 12 in De

Reports that contain weekly compilations of contradictions, exaggerations, distortions, and fabrications found in official Axis broadcasts. They were prepared for Government officials concerned with overseas propaganda or with public opinion in the United States. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-9).

SPECIAL REPORTS. Series I, Nos. l-ll, July 8-Feb. 27, 1942; Series II, Nos. 1-132, Apr. 4, 1942-Oct. 19, 1944. 5 in.

45 Prepared by the Analysis Division at irregular intervals. Each report is an analysis of a subject of special interest on the propaganda front, such as "Radio Tokyo: Racial Propaganda to the United States," "The Vatican's Attitude Towards the Bombing of Rome," and "The Hitler

Assassination Attempt: the First Twenty-Four Hours. Arranged numerically. For a list of these reports prepared by the FBIS, see appendix V. A Special Report No. I, "Text of the New Company Law of China," issued May 29, 1946, by the Far Eastern Section, FBIS, Military Intelligence Division, War Department, is at the end of the series.

SPECIAL ANALYSES. Aug. 5 Sept. 20, 1941. 1/2 in.

Reports that present the types of material contained in the Special Reports. They deal with such subjects as "Recent Strategy in German Propaganda" and "The Roosevelt-Churchill Conference as viewed by the German Radio." Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-4).

FOREIGN BROADCAST HIGHLIGHTS. July 18-Sept. 5, 1941. 1 in.

47 Reports that contain the highlights of Axis and Allied broadcasts. They were originally entitled Spot Bulletins. Arranged chronologically.

REPORTS ENTITLED PROPAGANDA MAN." Oct. 14, 1942-Jan. 7, 1943. 1/2 in.

18. Portray "the beliefs and attitudes which characterize the loyal and uncritical listener to the official radio of his country," with settings in Vichy, Paris, Japan, Italy, and Turkey. They were published at irregular intervals when significant changes in propaganda occurred. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-5).

NAMES AND PLACES IN THE NEWS. Mar. 1943-Feb. 10, 1964. 2 in. 49

Monthly reports that list alphabetically by country the names and official positions of important persons and places appearing in the news. Arranged by month.

ROUNDUPS OF RADIO REACTION TO THE SAN FRANCISCO CONFERENCE. Apr. 12

July 10, 1945. 2 in.

Reports that contain selections of foreign broadcasts prepared for the United States Delegation to the United Nations Conference on International Organization. Arranged chronologically.

PROGRAM SCHEDULES OF FOREIGN BROADCASTS. July 1942-Apr. 1947. 2 ft.

52

Reports that contain compilations of schedules of broadcasts by principal transmitters throughout the world (with data on frequencies, hours, languages of delivery, and program types), prepared twice a year for internal use as well as for user agencies. The information within cach compilation is organized geographically; the compilations are arranged chronologically. For changes in program schedules, see Station and Program Notes described in entry 52.

STATION AND PROGRAM NOTES. July 24, 1942-Dec. 20, 1946. 1 ft. 52

Seniweekly supplements to the Program Schedules of Foreign Broadcasts listing changes in broadcast schedules. These change sheets were intended for insertion in the Program Schedule Book of Foreign

Broadcasting Stations by the recipients of the book. Arranged numerically in two groups: Nos. 1-360, issued by the FBIS while under the FCC; and Nos. 1-33, issued by the FBIS while under the War Department.

LISTS OF PROGRAMS CANCELIED. Jan. 194:2-Mar. 1944. 5 in.

Copies of lists of radio programs not monitored for various reasons (no transcriber, unintelligible, no signal, and the like), giving the following data: time of the broadcast, date, type of program (news, talk, comment), language, and reason for cancellation. Arranged chronologically.

SHORTWAVE SCHEDULES AND RECEPTION NOTES. Oct. 1, 1943-Sept. 1, 1946. 1 in.

54 Reports that contain semimonthly compilations of shortwave station and schedule news contributed to the FBIS by nongovernment listeners. Included are the following data: the hours of operation, frequency and languages of shortwave broadcast stations, changes of hours of operation and frequency, and information regarding new stations and the reception of stations not normally audible. Arranged numerically (Nos, 1-67, with a few issues missing). BRO/DCASTING STATIONS OF THE WORLD. Dec. 9, 1942-Dec. 1, 1946. 4 in.

55

Reports, prepared continuously but at irregular intervals, that contain listings of the broadcasting stations of the world arranged by country and city, type of frequency, and station call letters. Arranged chronologically.

MORSE AND HELLSCHRIBER NEWS SCHEDULES. 1944-46. 1/2 in.

56 Issued irregularly, the schedules are arranged by continent (i.e., Europe, Asia, Africa, and South America) and thereunder by country. They contain the following data: the name of the listening post that covered the broadcast, the time of the broadcast, the name of the country or geographical area beamed to, the station call letters, the kilocycles, and the type of code (i.e., Morse or Hellschreiber). Arranged chronologically.

Records of the Office of the Director

This Office, including the Director of the FBIS, an Assistant Director, and an Administrative Assistant, was responsible to the Federal Communications Commission for the policies and operations of the Service in the performance of its administrative, informational, and analytical functions. It also maintained liaison with Federal and United Nations agencies. The Office was headed successively by Harold N. Graves, Jr., Lloyd Free, Robert D. Leigh, Edwin W. Hullinger, Charles S. Hyneman, and Russell M. Shepherd.

BUDGETARY MATERIALS. 1942-44. 4 in.

Interoffice and intraoffice memoranda, reports, and work papers relating chiefly to the financial condition of the Service and to the appropriation, estimate, justification, and allocation of funds. Unarranged.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Copies of letters sent to Members of Congress, officials of Government agencies, and eminent private individuals, which were prepared by officials of the Service for the signature of the Chairman of the FCC. They relate to the preparation of reports and issuances and to other activities of the FBIS and its predecessor, the FBMS. Arranged chronologically.

READING FILE OF HAROLD N. GRAVES, JR. Apr. 1941-Dec. 1943. 2 ft. 59

Copies of outgoing letters, many prepared for the signature of the Chairman of the National Defense Communications Board or of the Director of the FBIS, addressed to the President, Members of Congress, key officials of other Government agencies, professors at educational institutions, and others. They relate primarily to publications and other issuances of the FBIS and to personnel and other administrative matters. At the end of the series there is a reading file of memoranda from Mr. Graves to George E. Sterling, Chief of the National Defense Operations, FCC (May-December 1941), dealing with technical operations. Arranged by month and thereunder alphabetically by name of addressee.

MISCELLANEOUS CORRESPONDENCE OF HAROLD N. GRAVES, JR. 1941-43. I in.

Correspondence with professors at various universities, publishers, and others relating generally to operations of the FBIS. Arranged chronologically.

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE LONDON OFFICE. 1942-44. 1 in.

67 Chiefly teletype messages by cable and occasional letters delivered by diplomatic air pouch, which relate to monitoring operations, procedures, and personnel assignments. Unarranged.

62

CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO MONITORING OPERI TIONS IN NORTH AFRICA.

1942-43. 4 in.

Interoffice comunications and correspondence with the Psychological Warfare Branch of the Allied Forces Headquarters, the War Department, and the Office of War Information relating to the establishment and operation of a monitoring station in Algiers. (The FBIS personnel in Algiers were assigned to the Psychological Warfare Branch.) Arranged chronologically.

CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO DENVER MONITORING OPERATIONS.

1943.

2 in.

In two parts: (1) interoffice memoranda and correspondence with field correspondents at San Francisco and Denver relating to the establishment of monitoring operations at Denver to record Japanese broadcasts emanating from Tokyo; and (2) correspondence between Ken M. Iseri, Chief Translator at the Denver installation, and the Washington, San Francisco, and Portland installations relating chiefly to the recruitment of personnel. Each part is arranged chronologically.

LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE CHIEF FIELD CORRESPONDENT IN CHARGE OF

MONITORING OPERATIONS IN HONOLULU, T. H. 1944. 2 in.

Relate chiefly to the establishment of FBIS listening posts in the South Pacific area. Also included are a report of a survey of the Hawaiian Islands to determine the best location for a listening post; a report, map, and blueprints relating to the Kauai site for Broadcast Recording Unit operations; and informal activity reports. Arranged chronologically.

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FELD INSTALLATIONS. 1946. 4 ft.

Relates mainly to the exchange of news intelligence, monitoring activities, and administrative matters of the FBIS during the period when it was successively a part of the War Department's Military Intelligence Division and the Central Intelligence Group of the National Intelligence Authority. The correspondence is in five parts, each divided into incoming and outgoing messages and thereunder arranged chronologically: (1) messages to and from Cairo; (2) messages to and from Kauai and Guam; (3) messages to and from Portland, Oreg. ; (4) messages to London by Western Union and the U. S. Army Signal Corps; and (5) messages to and from Tokyo. A few domestic teletype messages containing information on program schedules, personnel administration, and deficiencies in monitoring equipment are filed at the end of the series.

LETTERS OF COMMENT ON SERVICES. 1941-43. 5 in.

66 Photostatic copies of letters received by the Chairman of the FCC, the Director of the FBMS (later the FBIS), and division chiefs from the Departments of State, War, the Navy, Commerce, and Justice; the Office of War Information, the Board of Economic Warfare, the Office of Strategic Services, the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, and agencies of Allied Governments containing commendatory remarks on the issuances of the Service or requests for special services. Copies of the replies are filed with several of the incoming letters. Arranged by name of agency.

RECORDS RELATING TO SOUTH AMERICAN RECEPTION TESTS. Jan. 1944. 1 in.

[ocr errors]

Reports of Broadcast Recording Unit engineers at Hato Rey, P. R., Silver Hill, Md., Kingsville, Tex., and Hayward, Calif.; texts of the

« PreviousContinue »