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casts originating chiefly in Latin America, which were transmitted by the Kingsville station. Arranged chronologically.

Teletyped Records of Outgoing Wires

The wires designated by the symbols A, B, C, D, E, S, X, and PM are direct FCC wires sent principally to Government agencies concerned with war propaganda. They consist of the more significant parts of the incoming wires and of the transcripts of broadcasts. Their content was selected according to the particular requirements of the agency to which they were tele typed.

"A" WIRES. Dec. 7, 1941-Dec. 31, 1946. 83 ft.

11 Teletyped records of wires sent to approximately 25 agencies, including the State, War, and Navy Departments and the Office of War Information, the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, the Office of Censorship, and the Office of Strategic Services. The Governments and agencies of Allied Nations, including the Philippine Commonwealth, also received these wires, which were designated during successive periods by the symbols FCC-I, FCC-2, etc.; FCC Al, FCC A2, etc.; FCC-L-1, FCC-L-2, etc.; FCCK Al, FCCK A2, etc.; and FBIS-L AI, FBIS-L A2, etc. The digits 1, 2, etc., indicate the serial order in which the wires were transmitted; the letter after the FCC or FBIS symbol indicates the monitoring station that is the source of the information transmitted (L for London, P for Portland, K for Kingsville, F for San Francisco, W for Washington). Arranged chronologically.

12

"B" WIRES. Oct. 25, 1941-Nov. 144, 1945. 58 ft.

Tele typed records of wires sent to the Office of War Information in Washington and New York giving propaganda summaries and texts. They are identified during successive periods by the symbols FCC 1, FCC 2, etc.; WFCC I, WFCC 2, etc.; and FCCW Bl, FCCW B2, etc. Arranged chronologically.

"C" WIRES. Apr. 30, 1942-Dec. 31, 1926. 18 ft.

Teletyped records of wires sent to the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs giving information on Latin America. They are identified by the symbols FCCIA-1, FCCIA-2; FCCK C1, FCCK C2; and FBIS-W ci, FBIS-W C2, successively. Arranged chronologically.

"D" WIRES. Mar. 16, 1943-July 21, 1945. 2 ft.

14 Teletyped records of wires sent to the British Ministry of Information giving Far East data. They are identified by the symbols FB1, FB2, etc.; and PRE #1, PRE #2, etc. In addition to these symbols, the wires carried the same form of day, hour, and minute designations as those used in the incoming wires. Arranged chronologically, with gaps.

NE" WIRES. June 2-Sept. 10, 1943. 4 in.

Teletyped records of wires sent to the Office of the Provost Marshal

General consisting of the texts or excerpts of broadcasts and messages sent by American prisoners of war and civilians interned by Axis Governments. They are identified by the symbols FCC El, FCC E2, etc. Arranged chronologically.

16

"S" WIRES. Sept. 8-10, 1943. 2 in.

Teletyped records of wires sent to the State Department consisting of the texts or excerpts of broadcasts emanating from transmitting stations throughout the world and relating to the withdrawal of Italy from the war in September 1943. They are identified by the symbols FCC Si, FCC S2, etc. Arranged chronologically.

"X" WIRES. Sept. 8, 1943-Jan. 12, 1946. 4 ft.

17 Teletyped records of wires sent to the Office of War Information in San Francisco. Inaugurated in September 1943 at the request of the Propaganda Analysis Section of the Office of War Information (OWI), the wires carried, from FBIS headquarters in Washington to the OWI on the West Coast, selections of intercepts from European transmitters for use in counter-propaganda programs in the Far East. They are identified by the symbols FCC Xl, FCC X2, etc. and later by FBIS XI, FBIS X2, etc. Arranged chronologically.

"PM" WIRES. Dec. 10, 1943-Aug. 30, 1945. 5 ft.

Teletyped records of wires sent by 24-hour teletype circuit linking the FBIS with the Office of the Provost Marshal General and consisting of messages from or allusions to American servicemen held captive by the enemy. These enemy radio broadcasts were designed to build up a listening audience in the United States. These wires are identified by the symbols FCC PMI, FCC PM2, etc. Arranged chronologically.

Processed Reports, Summaries, Interpretations, and Other Issuances DAILY REPORTS OF FOREIGN RADIO BROADCASTS. Sept. 4, 1941-Dec. 4, 1945. 42 ft.

19 Based on broadcasts intercepted by FCC engineers before 10 a. m., eastern war time, on the day of issue. During the period of optimum operation, each Daily Report was prepared in five parts: (1) key broadcasts; (2) highlights; (3) propaganda in Europe; (4) communiques; and (5) broadcasts by Germany, German-controlled stations, Japan, Italy, Great Britain, Australia, France, the French Antilles, the Soviet Union, Latin America, Turkey, Finland, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, China, and clandestine stations. The first Saturday issue of the Daily Report appeared on December 6, 1941; none was printed on Sunday. For several months after January 1, 1943, the Daily Report, the Morning Preview (see entry 21), and the Daily Analysis of Propaganda Concerning Latin America (see entry 30) were filed together. On October 1, 1945, the Daily Report was divided into three sections: the Far Eastern Section, the European Section, and the Latin American Section. Publication ceased on December 4, 1945; on January 3, 1946, the preparation of reports on broadcasts was resumed, and after that date the three sections were issued as separate reports (see entries 24, 26, and 27). The series is arranged chronologically.

20

QUARTERLY REVIEW. ca. Mar. 1942. 1/2 in.

Contains a general analysis of radio propaganda from Axis and Allied Nations during the period from December 1941 to March 1, 1942. There is a table of contents.

MORNING PREVIEWS. Aug. 29-Dec. 30, 1942. 4 in.

21 Brief summaries of war events as revealed by radio intercepts, statements regarding enemy propaganda themes, and verbatim transcripts of one or more key broadcasts. They were published daily except Sunday for distribution before Il a. m.; they were based on foreign broadcasts for the 24 hours preceding 8 a. M. of the day of issue. For several months after January 1, 1943, the Morning Previews were filed with the Daily Reports which they summarized. Arranged chronologically.

22

translated texts or excerpts os prie

SPECIAL RELEASES. Jan. 30, 1942-Jan. 18, 1944. 10 in.

Issued irregularly as supplements to the Daily Report. They contain the translated and untranslated texts or excerpts of speeches delivered by notables, and reports of world radio reaction to significant events. Arranged chronologically. For a list of the Special Releases, see appendix III.

TABLES OF CONTENTS TO DAILY REPORTS. Aug. Sept. 1945; Jan. -Dec. 1946. 4 in.

23 Issued daily. Arranged by month.

DAILY REPORTS, FAR EASTERN SECTION. Jan. 3-Dec. 31, 1946. 7 ft. :

Based on broadcasts monitored before 8 a. m. of the day of issue. Each report contains some or all of the following material, as listed in its table of contents: "Special Reports" and excerpts or summaries from broadcasts emanating from Japan, Free China, Occupied China, the Philippines, the Netherlands East Indies, French Indo-China, Thailand, India, Australia, and other countries. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-259).

25

INDEXES TO THE FAR EASTERN SECTION OF THE DAILY REPORT. Jan. 1, 1945

Oct. 31, 1946. 4 in.

These indexes to subjects and geographic areas were usually prepared monthly Arranged chronologically. Included also is a glossary in two parts: Part I, issued on April 24, 1945, contains names and terms frequently used in Japanese radio references to Government offices and positions, organizations, movements, and corps; and Part II, issued on September 15, 1945, contains coined phrases and currently used words and terms.

DAILY REPORTS, EUROPEAN SECTION. Jan. 3-Dec. 31, 1946. 7 ft. 26

Based on broadcasts monitored before 8 a. m. of the day of issue. Each report contains some or all of the following material, as listed in its table of contents: "Key Broadcasts" and excerpts or summaries of French, Belgian, Dutch, Italian, Russian, Balkan, Eastern European, German, Austrian, Greek, Scandinavian, Spanish, and Portuguese transmitters. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-259).

DAILY REPORTS, LATIN AMERICAN SECTION. Jan. 9-Dec. 31, 1946. 3 ft.

27 Based on broadcasts monitored before 8 a. m. of the day of issue. Each report contains some or all of the following material, as listed in its table of contents: "Key Broadcasts" and excerpts or summaries of monitored broadcasts from Argentina, the Caribbean area and Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Uruguay, and other Latin American countries. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-254).

DAILY DIGESTS OF OFFICIAL SHORTWAVE BROADCASTS BEAMED TO NORTH AMERICA. Sept. 8-Nov. 17, 1941. 8 in.

28 Reports based on shortwave broadcasts originating in Axis and Allied countries and recorded by FCC engineers before I a. m. of the day of issue. The information in most of the issues was listed in two tables of contents: in the first, according to the sources of the broadcasts; and in the second, according to the areas of the world to which the broadcasts related. Arranged chronologically.

2

DAILY DIGESTS OF OFFICIAL SHORTWAVE BROADCASTS BEAMED TO LATIN AMERICA,

Sept. 29-Nov. 17, 1941. 4 in.

Reports based on broadcasts originating in Germany, Italy, and France. The information in most of the issues was listed in a similar manner to that of the issuance described in entry 28. Arranged chronologically.

DAILY ANALYSES OF PROPAGANDA CONCERNING LATIN AMERICA. Aug. 5, 1942May 14, 1943. 3 in.

: 30 Reports, each consisting of four parts: (A) References to InterAmerican Affairs, (B) Military Operations, (C) International Events, and (D) Broadcasts From the Other American Republics. The Monday issue contains the Daily Analysis for that day as well as for the preceding Saturday and Sunday. After December 31, 1942, these issuances are filed with the Daily Reports of Foreign Radio Broadcasts (see entry 19). Arranged chronologically.

WEEKLY ANALYSES OF SHORTWAVE NEWS AND PROPAGANDA CONCERNING LATIN

AMERICA, May 25-Aug. 10, 1943. 1 in.

Contain the substance of broadcasts by Axis and Latin American transmitters and summaries of broadcasts dealing with special events. This issuance was the successor to the Daily Analysis of Propaganda Concerning Latin America. Arranged numerically (Nos. l-12).

WEEKLY REVIEWS OF OFFICIAL FOREIGN BROADCASTS. Dec. 8, 1941-Apr, 29, 1944. 3 ft.

32 Contain brief analyses of significant propaganda trends and news intelligence reflected in world radio broadcasts. The analyzed parts of the broadcasts relate to major events, military fronts, and regions in the United States, Latin America, Great Britain, Central Europe, South Europe, the Balkans, the Soviet Union, the Near East, the Middle East, and the Far East. This issuance was originally entitled Weekly Analysis of Official Foreign Broadcasts. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-126).

WEEKLY ANALYSES OF PROPAGANDA PRESSURES ON THE UNITED STATES. Aug. 8Oct. 26, 1942. 1 in.

33 Contain general accounts of radio propaganda disseminated by Axis and Allied Nations; prepared for Government officials concerned with public opinion in the United States. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-12). RADIO REPORTS ON THE FAR EAST. Aug. 24, 1942-Oct. 14, 1945. 3 ft.

34

Biweekly reports prepared by the Analysis Division for Government specialists on the Far East. Reports Nos. 66 and 73 include a list of approximately 3,000 Japanese notables; Report No. 64 includes a list of members of the Japanese House of Representatives. A list of special reports contained in the issuances was prepared by the FBIS (see appendix IV). Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-81).

CENTRAL EUROPEAN RADIO ANALYSES. Jan. 14, 1943-Apr. 27, 1944. i ft.

Weekly reports on Nazi radio propaganda comprising sections entitled "Themes of the Week," "The War Through Nazi Eyes," "Inside Nazi Europe," "New World Order," "Portrait of America," "Clandestine Transmitters," "Special Study," and other sections with varying titles. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-68).

CENTRAL EUROPEAN SURVEYS. May 13-Sept. 30, 1944. 2 in.

Reports that present in less detail the types of material contained in the Central European Radio Analysis, to which the Central European Survey was the successor. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-21).

WESTERN EUROPEAN ANALYSES. May 6, 1943-Apr. 28, 1944. 8 in.

Reports that contain weekly analyses of radio and press propaganda in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, and Portugal. This issuance was originally entitled the Western European Weekly. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-52).

WESTERN EUROPEAN WEEKLY SURVEYS. May 5-Sept. 22, 1944. i in. 38

Reports that present in less detail the types of material contained in the Western European Analysis, to which the Western European Weekly Survey was the successor. Arranged numerically (Nos. 1-21).

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