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POST-ROUTE (STATE) MAPS ANNOTATED WITH UNINTERPRETED NUMBERS. 1937-39. 3 itoms.

32 Published post-route maps which have six-digit numbers stamped generally along railroad routes. No key is given to these numbers. The se maps are listed in appendix III, with symbols differentiating them from the published record set of post-route maps. Arranged alphabetically by name of State.

Records of the Division of Motor Vehicle Service

Although there was an experimental automobile mail-collection service in Milwaukee, Wis., in February 1908, motor-vehicle service was not authorized by Congress until its inclusion in the postal appropriations for the fiscal year 1915. This service and the screen-wagon service (mail carried by wagon and later motor truck enclosed by a steel screen) were assigned to the Division of Post Office Services in the Bureau of the First Assistant Postmaster General on July 1, 1916. In September 1921 the work relating to the operation of the Government-owned motor-vehicle service and the contract-vehicle service was transferred to the newly created Division of Vehicle Transportation in the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General. The Division was redesignated the Division of Motor Vehicle Service on October 6, 1921, and was transferred back to the Bureau of the First Assistant. During the latter part of 1930 the Division was reassigned to the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General. The Division was mainly concerned with the operation of the Government-owned motor-vehicle service and the pneumatic-tube service.

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GENERAL RECORDS, 1896–1939. 8 ft.

Advertisements, contracts, and correspondence concerning the construction and operation of mail-transportation vehicles. The records also include materials relating to the claim of H.C. McFarlin of Little Rock, Ark., under a screen-wagon contract. Unarranged.

ROUTE REGISTERS AND CONTRACTS RELATING TO SCREEN-WAGON SERVICE. 1901-36.

100 vols. 28 ft.

The registers contain for each screen-wagon route the original order of the Department authorizing the establishment, change, or discontinuance of the route; the name of the contractor; the stations along the routes, if any, and the terminals; the mileage between stations; the rate of pay per milo; and the total amount paid per annum. There is also some information about transfer, mail-station, city-delivery, collection, and steamboat services; advertisements; proposals for carrying the mails by screen-wagon service; and instructions to bidders. For several periods for which no registers are available, there are volumes of original signed contracts. Both the registers and the volumes of contracts are arranged by the contract term of 4 years, thereunder by name of State or Territory, and the reunder by route number.

CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO THE SHIPMENT OF FARM PRODUCE BY MOTOR-TRUCK

SERVICE. 1919-20. 1 ft.
Interoffice memoranda and correspondence with postmasters, route agents,

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Members of Congress, farmers, and merchants relating to attempts to ship farm produce by postal trucks. Arranged alphabetically by commodity.

Records of Pneumatic-Tube Service

The transportation of mail by pneumatic tubes was initiated in 1893 in Philadelphia with the construction and use of an experimental line of 6-inch tubes between the Main Post Office and the East Chestnut Street Station. Because of demands to extend the service in Philadelphia and to establish it in other cities, the Post Office Department appointed a local and a general committee in 1900 to investigate and report on the advisability of extending the service. A formal report was submitted to Congress on January 4, 1901, which by an act of April 21, 1902, authorized the use of the service. Since July 1, 1904, provisions for pneumatic-tube-service contracts for Boston, New York City, Brooklyn, Chicago, and St. Louis havo been included in the annual appropriations for the Post Office Department.

GENERAL RECORDS, 1892-1919. 26 ft.

36 Correspondence, reports, contracts, and miscellaneous records relating to the establishment and operation of the pneumatic-tube mail service; records and correspondence concerning the invention and ownership of pneumatic tubes; correspondence, surveys, studies, and blueprints relating to the extension of the service from the New York General Post Office to a station in Brooklyn, and from the Boston General Post Office to the North Postal Station, to the South Terminal Railroad Station, to the Essex Street Postal Station, and to the Back Bay Station. Also included are statistics on the weight of mail delivered; reports on the proposed extension of services; advertisements for and correspondence related to bids to carry mails by pneumatic tubes; maps and blueprints of the routes to be used; and reports on the installation of air-cooling apparatus in the Boston General Post Office. Unarranged.

ORDERS. 1902-6. l vol. 1 in.

Original orders authorizing the establishment, change, or discontinance of pneumatic-tube service in Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, and St. Louis. The orders contain the name of the contractor, the names of stations along the route, the mileage between stations, the rate of pay per mile, and the total amount paid per annum. The volume also includes advertisements for contracts, proposals for carrying the mails by pneumatic tubes or similar devices, and instructions to bidders. Arranged by route number.

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RECORDS OF THE PNEUMATIC TUBE COMMISSION, 1912-14. 1 ft.

The Commission to Investigate Pneumatic Tube Postal Systems, usually known as the Pneumatic Tube Commission, consisted of two members of the House, two members of the Senate, and Second Assistant Postmaster General Joseph Stewart. It was established by Congress on August 24, 1912, to investigate the desirability of governmental ownership of the pneumatictube service then operated under contract in New York, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Brooklyn, and St. Louis.

The Commission's records include its minutes and final report; reports, memoranda, and photographs on the operation of the pneumatic-tube service correspondence and memoranda on related patents; and copies of contracts. Unarranged.

Records of the Division of Post Office Quarters

The responsibility for post-office quarters not in Federally owned buildings was shared by the Office of the Postmaster General, the Solicitor for the Post Office Department, the Chief Inspector, and the Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department until June 10, 1933, when Executive Order 6166 assigned the function to the Division of Building Operations and Supplies of the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General. In October 1933 the Postmaster General ordered this function transferred to the newly created Division of Post Office Quarters.

This Division leased or rentod quarters for post offices, post-office garages, and railway terminals; authorizod allowances for rent, light, fuel, water, and equipment required in such quarters; and reviewed reports prepared by postal inspectors relating to such quarters.

GENERAL RECORDS, 1916-42. 3 ft.

39 Correspondence, reports, and exhibits relating to an alleged combination among equipment companies to control prices; correspondence and reports relating to the maintenance and construction of post offices; administrative issuances; and divisional work progress reports. Arranged by subject or type of record.

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RECORDS RELATING TO LEASES. 1916-32. 3 ft.

Postal inspectors' reports relating to the valuation of postal quarters (post offices, stations, branches, terminals, and garages); postmasters' roports about local leases; hearings of a Senate committee on post-office leases; correspondence and reports concerning leases for the St. Paul Commercial Station and Chicago Post Office; architectural specifications and floor plans of the Boston Back Bay Station and the Chicago Federal Building; and a 1916-25 register of leases approved by the Solicitor for the Post Office Department. Arranged by type of record and thereunder chronologically.

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BLUEPRINTS, SKETCH PLANS, AND ESTIMATES FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF POST

OFFICE BUILDINGS OR EXTENSIONS. 1911-30. 12 ft.

In addition to the blueprints, plans, and estimates there are copies of Form No. 1414, prepared by postmasters, giving information about the number of employees and the space in and condition of Foderal buildings; questionnaries completed by postmasters on the space accommodations necessary for proposed Federal buildings; a few city maps showing notations of old and proposed postal stations and garages; and a few reports of leased property occupied by the Post Office Department. Arranged alphabetically by name of State.

RECORDS RELATING TO DEDICATIONS OF POST-OFFICE BUILDINGS AND OF CORNERSTONES. 1933–42. 12 ft.

42 Post office historios, containing datos of establishment, discontinuance, and reestablishment, name changes, names of postmasters and dates of their appointment, statements of postal receipts, and descriptions of the newly constructed post-office buildings; correspondence with postmasters and Congressmen relating to dedication ceremonies; lists of pending ceremonios; copies of dedication speechos; and postal inspectors' reports. Arranged alphabetically by name of State.

Records of the Division of Equipment and Supplies

In accordance with an order of the Postmaster General dated November 1, 1905, all clerks in the Post Office Department engaged in handling supplies and in work incident there to were transforred to the Division of Supplies under the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General. The Division was responsible administering the appropriation for all supplies purchased and furnished directly to the postal service.

On July 1, 1913, the Division of Equipment, which had operated the mail-bag repair shops and tho mail-lock shop in Washington, D. C., was transferred from the Bureau of the Second Assistant Postmaster General to the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmastor General and combined with the Division of Supplies. The name of the Division was not changed until October 6, 1921, when it became known as the Division of Equipment and Supplies and was made responsible for the manufacture of mail bags. In 1933, by order of the Postmaster General, the Division of Equipment and Supplies was redesignated the Division of Building Operations and Supplies. The former title, Division of Equipment and Supplies, was restored when the Postmastor General on June 18, 1943, reorganized the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmastor General along functional lines.

The Division was mainly concerned with the preparation of specifications for supplies and equipment; the review of bids and subsequont recommendations to purchasing agonts; and the receipt, storage, control, and issue of stock and operating equipment. The records of the Division that have beon retained illustrate the "housekooping" activities of the Post Office Department.

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RECORDS OF PRINTED MATTER ORDERED FROM CONTRACTORS. 1899-1902. 1 vol.

2 in.

The volume shows the order and item numbers, name of contractor, and quantity orderod, cost, and date of request for books, forms, and cards. Arranged by order number.

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OOST REPORTS. 1915-24. i ft.

Monthly reports of work performed in mail-equipment shops, showing the types of work, the number of employees and labor hours, and the labor and unit costs for each job. Arranged chronologically.

CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, 1924-27. Lin. 45

Rolatos to the ordering, uso, and disposition of firearms and ammunition for Railway Mail Servico employees. Arranged chronologically.

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MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS, 1868-1911. 3 ft.

Records arranged by the Post Office Department to illustrato the operations of the Division. Includod aro samples of bids, requisitions, and contracts for equipment and supplies; memoranda relating to proposals for repairing and maintaining post-office buildings; applications for positions ; lettors of recommendation; leave records; lists of employees; and corrospondenco concerning the disposition of wasto material. Intorspersed in this series are references to records of the Disbursing Clerk, which relate to acknowledgments of checks and vouchers, pay rolls, settlement of accounts, estimatos of appropriations for repairs, deficioncy estimates, contingent expenso accounts, and receipts for payments. Arranged chronologically.

Rocords of the Division of Rural Mails

Rural free delivery was instituted on October 1, 1896, and statutorily Doncantandent of established by an act of April 28, 1902, as a branch of the Office of tho General Superintondent of Free Delivery within the Bureau of the First

thin the

n orthern Assistant Postmaster General. On May 9, 1903, the Postmastor General transferred to the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmastor Gonoral the Division of Free Delivery, the Superintondent of City-Free-Delivery Servico, and the Superintendont of Rural Froo Dolive ry. The Office of the General Superintendent of Free Delivery was discontinued on May 27, 1903, and the remaining offices and servicos of the Division of Free Delivery we ro organizod into separato divisions.

On April 30, 1910, the Postmaster General directed that the star-route functions of the Division of Contracts in the Bureau of the Second Assistant Postmastor Goneral bo transferred to the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant and combined with the Division of Rural Free Dolivery under the title of Division of Rural Mails. The Division was responsible for the operation of rural-dolivery service and for the appointment and supervision of rural mail carriers. The Division was transforred to the Bureau of the First Assistant Postmaster General in 1929; to the Bureau of the Second Assistant Pos unastor Goneral in 1932; and back to the Bureau of the First Assistant Postmaster General on July 1, 1942, where it was coordinated with the other delivery services in the Post Office Servico.

A description of many of the early records of the Division of Rural Mails may bo found in series entries 52 and 53 of Preliminary Inventory No. 36, Records of the Bureau of the First Assistant Postmaster Goneral, 1789-1942. Since the publication of this invontory many more of the Division's records have been accessioned by the National Archives and they all are now grouped with the records of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General and described below. Most of the so records cover the period 190329, whon the Division was within the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant.

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