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STATEMENTS OF OWNERSHIPS. 1923-54. 618 ft.

11 Consist of sworn statements, on form 3256, of the ownership, management, and circulation of newspapers, magazines, periodicals, and other publications, as required by acts of August 24, 1912, and March 3, 1933. The statements, which had to be filed by October 1 of each year, include the names and post-office addresses of editors, publishers, business managers, owners, stockholders (if the publication is owned by a corporation), bondholders, mortgageholders, and/or other security holders. Statements on daily newspapers include the average number of copies sold or distributed to paid subscribers during the preceding 12 months. Arranged chronologically by calendar year, thereunder alphabetically by States, and thereunder alphabetically by name of the publicati on.

Records of the Division of Parcel Post

The Parcel Post Service was established January 1, 1913, within the Office of the Postmaster General. To supervise the service, the Postmaster General, on November 22, 1930, established the Division of Parcel Post within the Bureau of the Third Assistant Postmaster General.

RECORDS RELATING TO PARCEL-POST FACILITIES IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES. Sept. 1911-Jan. 1912. 5 ft.

15 Include bulletins, booklets, and memoranda relating to parcel-post rules, regulations, and rates in foreign countries. These were obtained in countries with a parcel-post service by diplomatic officers of the United States in response to a State Department circular dated August 24, 1911, and were transmitted to the Postmaster General. Parcel-post information was received from Australia, Austria, Germany, Great Britain, Guatemala, Haiti, Hungary, Luxemburg, Mexico, Morocco, the Netherlands, Portugal, Russia, San Salvador, Spain, Switzerland, and Venezuela. Arranged alphabetically by country.

RECORDS OF THE BUREAU OF THE FOURTH ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL

The Office of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General was established by order of the Postmaster General on August 1, 1891, in accordance with provisions of the Appropriations Act of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. 944), which authorized the appointment of a Fourth Assistant, Three divisions were set up within the Office to carry out the duties of supervising the establishment of new post offices; appointing, bonding, and commissioning postmasters; operating the inspection service; and investigating mail de predations. The ever-increasing volume of work performed by the Post Office Department made necessary the development of additional services and divisions within the Office of the Fourth Assistant, which about 1930 achieved the status of a bureau.

As most of the records described here were created before a reorganization of 1946, they are arranged according to the divisional organization existing during the early part of that year. Records of the Division of Rural Mails, however, which had been transferred to the Bureau of the First Assistant Postmaster General in 1929, are described as part of the records of the Fourth Assistant,

On August 20, 1949, the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General was abolished by the President's Roorganization Plan No. 3, which provided for a Bureau of Facilities under an Assistant Postmaster General to continue the functions of the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General.

The most important functions of the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General in 1949 were (1) the administration, operation, and maintenance of Government-owned post-office buildings; (2) the authorization of allowances for rent, light, and fuel for post offices and other postal quarters and allowances for the hire of vehicles required for collection and special-delivery services; (3) the custody and distribution of equipment and supplies for the Postal Service; (4) the supervision of screen-wagon, pneumatic-tube, and Government-owned motor-vehicle services; (5) the production and distribution of post-route maps and parcel-postzone keys; and (6) the supervision of mail-equipment shops, and the mamfacture and repair of mail bags, locks, keys, and key chains.

Records of the Immediate Office of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General

The Office consisted of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General, a deputy, a special administrative aide, assistants, and secretaries. The activities of the Office dealt mainly with (1) the supervision and administration of the operations of the divisions of the Bureau and its field offces, (2) the review and approval of budget estimates and of all journals and allowances from appropria tions relating to the Bureau, (3) the supervision of departmental and field personnel, and (4) the representation of the Postmaster General by the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General at Government conferences or in Federal committees relating to public buildings.

GENERAL RECORDS, 1905-32. 34 ft.

Letters received and copies of letters sent, memoranda, reports (of committees, investigations, costs, and work), statements, and instructions

ating to the operation of the Bureau and its divisions and offices. Arranged by classification number (see appendix I).

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17

CORRESPONDENCE OF JAMES I. BLAKSLEE. 1914-20. 1 ft.

This correspondence of Mr. Blaksler, Fourth Assistant Postmaster General from Mar. 17, 1913, to Mar. 14, 1921, relates to the appointment of postmasters, clerks, and rural mail carriers; post-office quarters; ruralmail service; and deliveries of farm produce by motor-vehicle service. Arranged alphabetically by name of correspondent.

Records of the Division of Topography

An Act of July 2, 1836, authorized the appointment of a clerk to act as topographer of the Post Office Department. The Office of the Topographer, originally under the Chief Clerk, was reda signated the Division of Topography on December 1, 1905, and was transferred from the Office of the Postmaster General to the Bureau of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General. On July 1, 1913, this Division was absorbed by the Division of Supplies. In accordance with a 1953 order of the Postmaster General, the Division of Supplies was divided into the Division of Equipment and Supplies and the Division of Topography. These divisions are parts of the Bureau of Facilities, as the Bureau of the Fourth Postmaster General has been known since 1949.

Although the Division of Topography is mainly responsible for compiling, drawing, revising, printing, and distributing post-route maps (State, county, rural-delivery, and air-mail), it also prepares special-purpose maps and organizational and fiscal charts.

OUTGOING CORRESPONDENCE, Oct. 15, 1901-Sept. 1, 1911. 1 vol. 2 in.

18 Chiefly press copies of letters and memoranda relating to the organization of the Office of the Topographer, budget estimates and expenditures, personnel, techniques of reproducing post-route maps, advertisement of proposals for reproducing and furnishing post-route maps, and the acquisition of supplies and equipment. Annual and progress reports of the Office of the Topographer and lists of rural-delivery-service maps are also included in the series. Arranged chronologically.

REPORTS OF SITE LOCATIONS. 1865-1946. 292 ft.

Completed forms submitted by postmasters, giving the location of their post offices and other geographical information to aid the Post Office Department in the preparation of postal maps. The se forms contain such data as the official name of the post office together with local name or name changes; section, township, range, and meridian in which the post office was located; terminals of the nearest postal route; mileage to the adjacent post offices, rivers, and creeks; footage or rods to the nearest railroad tracks, railroad depot, or highway; and a diagram or map of the location of the post office. The series includes a few scattered reports dated as early as 1837 and as late as 1950. Arranged alphabetically by name of Stato, the reunder alphabetically by name of county and post office, and lastly chronologically by date of report.

ATLAS OF POSTAL MAPS, 1839. 13 sheets. 1 inch.

20 A published record copy of The American Atlas Exhibiting the Post Offices, Railroads, Canals, and the Physical and Political Divisions of the United States of America Constructed ... Under the Direction of the Post Master General by David H. Burr, Geographer to the House of Representatives of the U. S." There are maps of the United States and adjacent countries, and maps of the following States portrayed singly or in combinationMaine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland and Delaware, North and South Carolina, Georgia and Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Arkansas, Ohio and Indiana, Kentucky and Tonnessee, Ilinois and Wisconsin, and Michigan and part of Wisconsin Territory.

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POST-ROUTE MAPS, 1867-94. 47 items. 6 in.

21 An incomplete published record set of intermediate-scale maps of sections of the United States. These maps were created under the direction of the Topographer of the Post Office Department. They show post offices, distances between offices, frequency of service, and mail-carrying railroads by name of railroad and include county boundaries and principal drainage features. These maps usually include from two to six States, Territories, or parts of States and Territories. They ante date the PostRoute (State) Maps described in entry 22 and are different in format. Many of the maps have been corrected by hand and the date of the correction is written on the map. Arranged chronologically by date of publication. These maps are listed chronologically in appendix II. Similar maps of this and earlier periods may be found among the cartographic records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers, RG 77.

22

POST-ROUTE (STATE) MAPS. 1894–1957. 448 items. 2 ft.

Published record set of maps of the individual States, Territories, and island possessions of the United States, on an intermediato scale. showing information relating to post offices, postal routes, mail-carrying railroads by name of railwad, rural-delivery routes, air-mail routes, mail-supply points, and method and frequency of postal service. In addition to postal information these maps show county boundaries and principal drainage features. This series of maps, although different in format, is a continuation of the series described in entry 21 and was designed to include all editions of a given map. It is incomplete, however, for the years before 1937. Some of the editions of these maps, particularly for the years 1917 and 1935-40, have been annotated to show special types of information and are described in entries 25 and 30. The post-route maps are listed in appendix III. Arranged alphabetically by name of State, Territory, or island possession and thereunder chronologically by date of publication.

MANUSCRIPT MAPS. 1901-47. 63 items. 2 in.

Manuscript post-route maps of States, Territories, and island possessions used to prepare the published post-route maps. Changes were made as necessary on the manuscripts, and each one is correct as of the last dato appearing on it. Some of the earlier maps, however, are not dated. They show essentially the same de tail as the published post-route maps described in entry 22. Arranged alphabetically by name of State or other area. These maps are listed in appendix IV.

POSTAL-ZONE MAPS. 1913. 124 items. lin.

24 A series of published official parcel-post maps of the United States, dated 1913, with annotations of unknown date showing boundaries of zones used to determine parcel-post changes. These maps were prepared for use with the parcel-post guide. There is also a map annotated to show parcelpost unit areas within each State. Arranged numerically by zone number.

POST-ROUTE (STATE) MAPS SHOWING NAVIGABLE WATERS, 1917. 14 items. 25

Published post-route maps of States mainly in the eastern United States,

annotated with information relating to the navigable waters in the particular State and to the coastal waters of those States bordering on the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. These maps are listed by State in appendix III, with symbols differentiating them from the published record set of the post-route maps. Arranged alphabetically by name of State.

CITY MAPS, 1912-35. 575 items. 3 ft.

Published, photoprocessed, and manuscript maps of selected cities in the United States annotated with information apparently relating to delivery routes and location of postal facilities, business sections, sidewalks, and mail boxes. Arranged numerically by case number and thereunder alphabetically by name of State and within the State by cities.

27

RURAL-DELIVERY-ROUTE MAPS, 1927-28. 600 items. 1 ft.

A representative sampling of the maps prepared to show individual ruraldelivery routes throughout the United States. These maps, which are generally annotated blueprints, are accompanied by a carbon type script of the official description of the route giving the direction and stops to be made, the distance between each stop, and the total mileage of the route. Arranged alphabetically by name of post office.

28

RURAL-DELIVERY LOCAL CENTER MAPS, 1900-1937. 600 items. 1 ft.

Manuscript maps of rural areas throughout the United States showing the rural-delivery routes servicing the areas. Arranged alphabetically by name of State.

RURAL-DELIVERY-ROUTE COUNTY MAPS. n. d. 40 items. 3 in.

An incomplete set of photoprocessed county maps, probably of the 1930 showing the rural-delivery routes. Arranged alphabetically by name of State and thereunder by name of county.

30

POST-ROUTE (STATE) MAPS SHOWING CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 1935-40. 58

itoms. 4 in.

An incomplete set of published post-route maps annotated to show the boundaries and the numbers of the congressional districts within the individual States. These maps are listed by State in appendix III, with symbols differentiating them from the published record set of post-route maps. Arranged alphabetically by name of State and thereunder chronologically by date of publication of the base map.

POST-ROUTE (STATE) MAPS ANNOTATED WITH UNINTERPRETED RED DOTS. 1935-40, 63 items. 4 in.

31 Published post-route maps with annotations in the form of red dots over certain cities or towns. There is no key to these dots, which appear to have been placed on the maps by hand. One conjecture is that they identify first-class offices. The se maps are listed by State in appendix III, with symbols differentiating them from the published record set of the post-route maps, Arranged alphabetically by name of State and the reunder chronologically by date of publication of the base map.

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