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PUBLISHED BY THE SAME AUTHOR;

LESSONS IN PLAIN PENMANSHIP,

ON THE SYSTEM LONG EMPLOYED WITH SUCCESS IN THE

LITTLE TOWER STREET ACADEMY.

SECOND EDITION.

In Two Parts, separately done up in Paper Covers, price 2s. 6d.; or in Cloth, with Leather backs, price 3s. 6d.

*** Attention is especially invited to the introductory illustrations; and the directions given in the pages accompanying the separate copylines of Part I. of these Lessons.

INDEX TO PROBLEMS.*

PROBLEMS. SECT. I.

RELATING TO THE EARTH'S SURFACE, AND TO ITS DIURNAL

ROTATION.

FROB. PAGE

I. Ter. Gl.—To find the distance between two places . 66

II. T.—To find the latitude of a given place . . 69

III. T.—To find the difference of latitude between any two

places 72

IV. Cel. And T.—To find the declination of a given star,

and the places which pass directly underneath it, as

the earth rotates 74

V. T.—The declination of a star, &c., being given (or the

latitude in which it culminates vertically), to find to

what places it is constantly above the horizon, and

where it cannot rise 75

VI. T.—Having the declination of a star, and the place to

which it is appearing to pass vertically, to find all

those places to which it is at that instant rising, and

what portion of the time of each diurnal rotation of

our earth certain of those places severally spend in

that star's beams ....... 78

VII. T.—Having the declination of a star, to find at what

altitude the star appears to the inhabitants of a given

place after the lapse of a certain portion of time

from its rising 81

VIII. C.—A certain star being in the zenith of a certain

place, to find the amplitude of any stars rising or

setting there; and the azimuth, at that instant, of

any stars that may then be above the horizon . . 82

IX. T.—A place being given, with the angle of position or

apparent bearing of another place of given distance,

to find that place ...... 84

X. T. and C.—A place being given at which a certain star

is culminating vertically, to find those places where

certain other stars are vertical at that instant . . 87

• If, on account of a limitation of time, it should be found absolutely neces-
sary to abridge the Course of Problems, the Author would recommend the
omission only of the following ;—viz. of Sect. I., Probs. 1, 3, 7, 9,10,11, 13:—
Of Sect. II., Probs. 1, 7, 8, 12, and the Exercises on pp. 160—161 :—Of Sect.
III., Probs. £ and Z. But the Definitions, &c., prefixed to all these Problems,
must, notwithstanding, be attentively regarded.

PROBLEMS. SECT. II.

INDEX TO PROBLEMS. IX

PROB. PAGE

IV. T.—The day of the year being given, to find the length

of that day in a certain latitude; and the altitude of

the sun at any distant place when he is setting at the

place of observation . . . . . .117

V. T.—The month, day, and hour at any place being

given, to find that particular place on the earth where

the sun is vertical, and all others that have noon;

those places also that have morning twilight, and

those to which the sun is rising; those places where

the sun is setting j those which have evening twilight;

and those places at which it is midnight . . 119

VI. T.—The day of the year being given, to note all places

to which the sun on that day does not set, and those

places where the sun does not rise; and to record his

elevations at noon and midnight in the longitudes of

the former places, and his depressions below the

horizon at noon and midnight in the longitudes of

the latter 123

VII. T.—Given the longitude and the sun's meridian altitude

on a certain day, to find the place where the observa-

tion was made ....... 125

VIII. C.—Having a given day, to find at what time a certain

star comes to the meridian 126

IX. C.—The day, hour, and the latitude of the place being

given, to find what stars are rising, culminating, and

setting; and so to arrange the axis of the globe, as

that the stars depicted on its surface may, each of

them, be exactly opposite their corresponding stars

in the heavens ....... 128

X. C.—Having a latitude within the north frigid zone, to

find the length of the period of the continual presence

or absence of the sun; and to note some of the phte-

nomena of the heavens during those periods . . 132

XI. T.—A number of days being given during which the

sun is above the horizon or below it in the frigid

zones, to find the latitude and the places . 137

XII. T.—To find what places are Bituated in a given climate.

Conversely, To find the climate in which a given place

is situated ........ 139

XIII. C.—To find that portion of the equation of time which

results from the obliquity of the ecliptic . . 142

XIV. C.—The latitude, day, and hour being given, to find the

azimuth or bearing of the sun or of a star, and its

altitude. Conversely, To find the hour of a certain

day, and the altitude of the sun, or of a star, the

azimuth and latitude being given . . . .143

XV. T.—(Marked erroneously, XVI.) Having the latitude,

to find the two days of the year which are of a given

length, and in what time that length of day is altered

by a certain quantity 146
PROB. PAGE

PROBLEMS. SECT. III.

RELATING TO THE TRADE WINDS, THE MOON'S NODES, ECLIPSES,
THE TIDES, THE PRECESSION OF THE EQUINOXES, ETC.

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* In the Rule to this Problem (page 158, line 15), for " sun's place" read

'given place."

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