The life of Henry Fielding

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Page 263 - Fielding being mentioned, Johnson exclaimed, " he was a blockhead ; " and upon my expressing my astonishment at so strange an assertion, he said, " What I mean by his being a blockhead is, that he was a barren rascal.
Page 162 - Sir Roger and his chaplain, and their mutual concurrence in doing good, is the more remarkable, because the very next village is famous for the differences and contentions that rise between the parson and the squire, who live in a perpetual state of war. The parson is always preaching at the squire; and the squire, to be revenged on the parson, never comes to church.
Page 265 - Why, I could act as well as he myself. I am sure if I had seen a ghost, I should have looked in the very same manner, and done just as he did. And then, to be sure, in that scene, as you...
Page 360 - Sir, he was a scoundrel, and a coward : a scoundrel for charging a blunderbuss against religion and morality ; a coward, because he had not resolution to fire it off himself, but left half a crown to a beggarly Scotchman to draw the trigger after his death...
Page 3 - Feilding," like the head of the house ? "I cannot tell, my lord," said he, " except it be that my branch of the family were the first that knew how to spell.
Page 385 - VOCABULARY, or English Spelling Book; with the Meaning attached to each Word. Compiled for the use of Ackworth School. New Edition. 18mo. cloth, Is.
Page 359 - They have put in the papers a good story made on White's : a man dropped down dead at the door, was carried in ; the club immediately made bets whether he was dead or not, and when they were going to bleed him, the wagerers for his death interposed, and said it would affect the fairness of the bet.
Page 357 - He has an admirable natural love of truth, the keenest instinctive antipathy to hypocrisy, the happiest satirical gift of laughing it to scorn. His wit is wonderfully wise and detective; it flashes upon a rogue and lightens up a rascal like a policeman's lantern.
Page 265 - Partridge, with a contemptuous sneer ; ' why, I could act as well as he myself. I am sure if I had seen a ghost, I should have looked in the very same manner, and done just as he did. And then, to be...
Page 393 - BARTLETT (WH),— FOOTSTEPS OF OUR LORD AND HIS APOSTLES, in Syria, Greece, and Italy. A succession of Visits to the Scenes of New Testament Narrative. With Twenty-three Steel Engravings, and several Woodcuts. Third Edition, super-royal 8vo. cloth, gilt edges, 124.; morocco elegant, 21s. • FORTY DAYS IN THE DESERT...

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