Medical Ethics

Front Cover
Robert M. Veatch
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 1997 - Medical - 461 pages
Fourteen leading authorities in their respective fields provide the mo st comprehensive and current survey of issues in medical ethics ever w ritten. Each author is given the opportunity to write a chapter survey ing a critical issue in one of the major subject areas in medical ethi cs. Within each chapter, the author develops a discussion of the criti cal concepts, arguments and positions in a particular facet of medical ethics, without arguing for one position or another. Since the first edition of Medical Ethics in 1989, important changes have occurred tha t affect every chapter in this book. To address these changes, Robert Veatch has asked the original contributors to address the developments of the past six years. Additionally, Ronald Bayer has contributed a n ew chapter on AIDS and ethics. Norman Daniels, former member of the et hics advisory group for President ClintonFs Health Care Task Force, pr ovides a framework for understanding the ethical dimension of the heal th care policy debate.

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Contents

An Introduction
1
The Role of Codes
18
Discussion Questions
24
Moral Justification and Moral Theories
30
Connecting General Principles to Particular
37
Criticisms of Principles
45
Discussion Questions
53
Death and Dying
100
Criteria for Evaluating Allocations
324
Ethical Criteria
331
Rights to Health Care
337
Obligations
355
Dan W Brock
363
The Incompetent Patient
370
Some Cases of Special Policy Concern
386
Discussion Questions
392

Limiting Procreation
103
Informed Consent
182
The Supply of Organs
247
The Experimental Frontier
255
National HealthCare Reform
415
Glossary
443
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Robert Veatch is currently a professor of medical ethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and professor of philosophy at Georgetown University. For ten years previously, he was on the staff of the Hastings Center (formerly the Institute of Society, Ethics, and the Life Sciences). Veatch was born in Utica, New York, and received a B.S. degree from Purdue University (1961), an M.S. from the University of California at San Francisco (1962), and a B.D. (1964), M.A.(1970), and Ph.D. (1971) from Harvard University. A lecturer and writer, Veatch is the author of many important books on ethical issues in biology and medicine. Veatch's areas of interest center on the relation of science to public policy, death and dying, and experimentation on human subjects. He has worked both to assemble numerous case studies and to advance general theoretical reflection in these areas. In A Theory of Medical Ethics (1981), he argues that current medical codes such as the Hippocratic Oath are too restrictive and lack sufficient support for comprehensive use in the medical profession. The solution, he argues, is that medicine can no longer be based on a professionally articulated code. Instead, Veatch proposes a "covenant" theory of medical ethics that resembles the traditional social contract of philosophers such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

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