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missible deck load for such tween decks shall not be in excess of 45 pounds per square foot of tween-deck space for each foot of tween-deck height, except where the deck and hatch structure of ships have been specially designed or reinforced for the carriage of heavy loads the Captain of the Port may permit loading in accordance with these schedules of increased intensity of loading when they are furnished by the master or operator. § 146.29-65 Damaged or leaking con

tainers of explosives. (a) Any container of explosives or chemical warfare agents showing evidence of failure, leaking of a liquid ingredient or inability to retain its contents shall not be accepted for transportation, storage, or stowage on board any vessel.

(b) Any container of an explosive when offered for transportation, storage, or stowage, showing excessive dampness or which is moldy or shows outward signs of any oil stain or other indications that absorption of the liquid part of the explosive is not perfect, or that the amount of the liquid part of the explosive is greater than the absorbent can carry, shall not be accepted for transportation. The shipper must substantiate any claim that a stain is due to accidental contact with grease, oil, or similar substances. In case of doubt the container shall be refused.

$ 146.29-71 Constructing magazines.

(a) All work in connection with the construction of a magazine, or other conditioning of holds, decks, or hatches shall be completed before the actual loading of military explosives is undertaken except as provided in $$ 146.29–35 (e) and 146.29-81(b). Magazine construction or other conditioning of a hold in which military explosives are not actually being loaded or which do not contain any military explosives is permitted.

(b) Sizes of material used for the construction of a magazine or other conditioning of holds, decks, or hatches, et set forth in the regulations in this subpart, are minimum. Increased sizes may be used, if desired. Nalls shall not protrude beyond the surface of the lumber or other material authorized. $ 146.29-73 Preparation of magazines,

decks, hatches and holds for han

dling military explosives. (a) All magazines and holds shall be cleared of all rubbish and discarded dunnage and be swept, hosed down or cleaned by such other eficient method that will insure the compartment to be broom clean and free of any residue from cargo before commencing to load any military explosives. Bilges, overhead deckbeams and strongbacks shall be examined and any residue of previous cargo removed therefrom.

(b) All decks, gangways, and hatches over or through which military explosives must be passed or handled in loading or unloading shall be freed of all loose material and shall be swept broom clean both before and after loading or unloading.

(c) The hatches or cargo ports opening into a compartment in which milltary explosives are stowed shall be kept closed at all times except during the operation of loading or unloading of the compartments or during periods of short duration for such as lunchbreaks and railcar and truck switching or between shifts on a two- or three-shift daily operation. During the period of such stoppages the hold shall be protected as prescribed by the Captain of the Port. Hatches covered with wooden covers shall be securely closed with tarpaulins.

§ 146.29–67 Defective ammunition.

Ammunition found to be defective while being unloaued from & barge, freight car, or other vehicle, shall not be placed on board a vessel. I found to be defective while on board the vessel, it shall, if at all possible, be removed from the vessel to an isolated location as quickly as possible. $ 146.29-69 Recoopering da m

a m a ged packages. Defective packages shall not be recoopered in the hold of a vessel. Such packages shall not be recoopered elsewhere on board the vessel except upon conditions authorized by the Captain of the Port. Replacing bomb shipping bands, loose covers, nose plugs or strapping containers is not classed as recoopering.

(d) No debris of any description which creates a fire hazard or a hazardous condition for persons engaged in the explosives handling operation shall be permitted to stand on the weather deck of a vessel while military explosives are being worked.

(e) (1) Hatch beams and hatch covers shall, where possible, be stowed on the opposite side of the hatch from that over which the military explosives are being worked. If this is impossible, they may be stowed on the working side of the hatch.

(2) Hatch beams shall be stowed or secured in a manner that will prevent them from rolling, rocking, turning or sliding.

(3) Hatch covers shall be so stowed as to form as level a platform as possible.

(f) During the time a hatch is open and military explosives are being worked or stowed, the vessel's officer on duty supervising the handling of explosives shall warn the masters of other vessels coming alongside and the operator of any dock equipment (capable of producing sparks) to stay clear of the area adjacent to open hatches as far as practicable. (CGFR 62–11, 27 F.R. 5287, June 5, 1962, as amended by CGFR 67-23, 32 F.R. 8158, June 7, 1967; CGFR 69-72, 34 F.R. 17494, Oct. 29, 1969) § 146.29-75 Location of magazines and

ammunition stowage. (a) A cool location being an important factor, magazines shall be built and milltary explosives stowed in an authorized location in accordance with the following factors in the order listed. The Captain of the Port may authorize in his discretion a modification of the below established location priorities when circumstances so justify:

(1) A tween-deck hold, preferably a lower tween-deck.

(2) A lower hold.
(3) In the square of a hatch.

(4) A shelter deck in a location as far removed from uptakes or engine casing as possible.

(5) A forecastle, poop or permanent deck house provided the space is ventilated and does not contain any “In use" crew accommodations, nor vessel stores,

and can be closed off from traffic while at sea.

(6) "On deck" stowage.

(7) Insulated spaces normally comprising refrigerator spaces may be used for the stowage of all classes of military explosives, except Class II-J chemical ammunition: Provided, That all regulations relative to stowage of explosives with other dangerous articles of cargo are observed and the spaces may be ventilated sufficiently to provide a temperature consistent with the temperature of other holds of the vessel. When such spaces are fully ceiled, the entire compartment will be considered as a magazine, however, any pipes within the compartment shall be protected by horizontal cargo battens of a size not less than commercial 2" x 4", spaced not more than 12 inches apart, center to center and secured to 4" X 6'' uprights spaced not more than 36 inches apart. Refrigerator spaces, the floors of which are lined with lead, shall not be used as a stowage for picric acid in bulk or ammonium picrate.

(b) When it is necessary to construct a magazine or to stow ammunition adjacent to the engine room, boiler room or coal bunker bulkheads, or the engine or boiler room uptakes or casings, the following provisions shall be complied with except in the stowage of small arms ammunition without explosive bullets:

(1) A tight wooden temporary bulkhead shall be constructed at least one foot off the permanent bulkheads, uptakes or casings with the smooth side facing the stowage of the explosives or ammunition.

(2) When the permanent bulkhead is smooth on the cargo side, construction shall be of commercial 2-inch boarding secured to uprights of 4" X 6'' size spaced not more than 30 inches apart in the 'tween or shelter deck, or 6" X 6" size spaced not more than 24 inches apart in the lower hold. Uprights shall not be stepped directly onto & metal deck or overhead. A 2'' x 6'' bearer to carry the upright shall be laid on the metal deck, and a 2" x 6" header shall be fitted against the underside of the overhead deck to receive the top of uprights. Top of uprights fitted against overhead deck

beams may be wedged direct to the beam with 2" x 4" spacers fitted between. Suitable horizontal stringers shall be fitted between temporary and permanent bulkhead at the top and bottom, as well as intermediate stringers spaced a maxi. mum of 5 feet. Uprights shall be securely fastened to horizontal stringers or hortzontally braced at the top, bottom and center.

(3) When the permanent bulkhead stiffeners are on the cargo side, suitable uprights of not less than 2'' X 4'' may be installed against the permanent vertical stiffeners to give the required 12 inches off the bulkhead. If the permanent stiffeners are over 30 inches apart, center to center, 242-inch boarding shall be used. Uprights shall be stepped and braced as required by the provisions of subparagraph (2) of this paragraph. Bulkhead stiffeners that do not extend the full depth of the cargo space shall not be used for this purpose.

(4) Other methods of construction using steel or wooden uprights, bolted to plates or lugs welded to deck beams, decks, or tank tops may be used provided the strength is equivalent to that obtained by the foregoing methods of construction.

(c) Stowage provided for military explosives shall be dry and except for deep tanks well ventilated.

(d) Ammunition as cargo shall not be stowed within a distance of 10 feet of a vessel's radio shack, receiving or transmitting apparatus, radio antenna or antenne lead-in. The same restriction applies to radar equipment. (CGFR 62–11, 27 FR. 5287, June 5, 1962, as amended by CGFR 67-23, 82 F.R. 8159, June 7, 1967) § 146.29–77 Allocation of stowage.

Military explosives that are tendered to a vessel for transportation as cargo shall be stowed on board the vessel utilizing the type of stowage authorized for the particular ammunition or explosives in bulk by the provisions of g 146.29-100. 8 146.29–79 Types of stowage.

The types of stowage prescribed for military explosives are described as follows:

(a) Magazine stowage A.
(b) Ammunition stowage.

(c) Chemical ammunition stowage.
(d) Special stowage.
(e) Portable magazine stowage.
(f) Pyrotechnic stowage.

(g) Stowage of blasting caps, detonators, primer detonators, etc.

(h) Deck box and van. 8 146.29–81 Magazine Stowage A.

The following shall be observed in the construction of a magazine required by the table in $ 146.29-100 for “Magazine A" type of stowage:

(a) Magazines may be constructed of steel or wood.

(b) Magazines constructed of steel shall have the whole of the interior thoroughly protected by wood dunnage of a minimum thickness of 34 Inch. This llning may be installed during the progress of the stowage. Metal stanchions within the magazine shall be boxed with wood of a thickness of not less than 34 inch. Boxing of portable non-ferrous dunnage system stanchions is not required. Bulkhead stiffeners or other structural members extending into the stowage spaces shall not be protected by dunnaging but shall be completely boarded over. When bare steel decks or tank tops are utilized to form the floor of a magazine, a wooden floor consisting of at least two layers of commercial 1-inch thick dunnaging shall be laid, the top course being laid crosswise to the lower course. When steel decks or tank tops are originally fitted with & wood flooring or are ceiled, it shall be necessary to fit one course of dunnage. All flooring formed by these methods shall be laid with commercial 1-inch lumber of widths not less than 4 inches, fitted as close as possible, edge to edge and butt to butt.

(c) Magazines constructed of wood shall have the bulkheads forming the sides and ends constructed of commercial 1-inch lumber, of 34-inch tongue and groove sheathing, or of 94-inch plywood, secured to uprights of at least a 3" x 4" size, spaced not more than 18 inches apart and secured at top, bottom and center with horizontal bracing. When 34-inch plywood is used, the uprights may be spaced on 24-inch centers. Uprights shall not be stepped directly onto & metal deck. Az" x 4" bearer to carry the uprights shall be laid upon the metal deck. A 2" x 4" beader shall be fitted against the underside of an overhead deck to receive the top of uprights. Top of uprights fitted against channel beams may be wedged directly to the beam with 2" by 4" spacers fitted between. Care shall be taken in securing upright framing that no nails penetrate to the interior of the magazine. when & magazine is constructed as a permanent compartment in the vessel, increased size and finish of lumber and other methods of fastening may be used provided such fastenings are recessed below the surface of the boarding to avoid projections within the interior of the magazine. All boardings shall be Atted and finished so as to form a smooth surface within the interior of the magazine. Construction shall be such as to separate all containers of explosives from contact with metal surfaces of the structure of the vessel. When & metal stanchion, post or other obstruction is located within the interior area of the magazine, such obstruction must be completely covered with wood of a thickness of at least 34 inch secured in place with nails or screws. When screws are used for fastening, the screwheads shall be countersunk below the surface of the wood. The floor of the magazine shall conform to the provisions of paragraph (b) of this section. The door of the magazine shall be of substantial construction, fitted reasonably tight into its jamb. The door may be secured in place by the use of extension battens and wedges.

(d) A magazine constructed in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, in which it is proposed to stow containers of explosives within 12 inches of the overdeck beams, or batch coaming, shall have such deck beams and coaming sheathed with wood similar to that required for metal stanchions, posts or other obstructions by the provisions of paragraph (c) of this section.

(e) When & Class A magazine measures more than 40 feet in any direction, a partition bulkhead shall be fitted within the magazine as near hall length as practicable, extending from the deck to

at least the top of the stowage. Such partition bulkhead shall be constructed to the same scantlings as the sides of the magazine, except the boardings may be spaced not more than 6 inches apart alternately on both sides of the uprights. This bulkhead shall be constructed before loading commences and care shall be exercised that nail points do not protrude beyond the surface of the boarding, Such partition bulkheads are not required in magazines using the U.S. Navy nonferrous metal dunnage system.

(f) A magazine constructed in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section shall comply with the provisions of $ 146.28_75(c), (CGFR 62–11, 27 F.R. 5287, June 5, 1962, as amended by CGFR 67-23, 32 F.R. 8159, June 7, 1967) $ 146.29-83 Ammunition stowage.

Military explosives that are authorized to be given ammunition stowage by the provisions of $ 146.29~100 shall be stowed in a location selected in accordance with the provisions of $ 146.29–75. Dunnage shall be laid over metal decks or tank tops, except that dunnage is not required when decks or tank tops are coated with mastic, magnesite, or other equivalent material, and when palletized units are used and the pallets are constructed of wood. Dunnaging shall be fitted to protect packages or articles or military explosives from damage. Nothing within this paragraph shall be construed as requiring the entire interior of the cargo compartment to be covered with dunnage.

& 146.29–85 Chemical ammunition

stowage. Chemical ammunition or chemical agents in bulk that are authorized to be given chemical ammunition stowage by the provisions of $ 146.29–100 shall, unless given another authorized stowage, be stowed under the following conditions:

(a) Shall be afforded the same protection as required for ammunition stowage.

(b) Stowage shall preferably be in a deep tank or a lower hold.

(c) When stowed in a deep tank, pump suctions shall be effectively sealed off to prevent the escape of any leakage which may take place. Sealing off shall be accomplished by inserting a blank flange in way of the suction side of the bilge pump manifold.

NOTE: The blank flange is to prevent inadvertent leaking of chemical agents into occupied spaces through bilge suction piping. Nothing herein shall preclude the removal of the flange in an emergency situation should (in the opinion of the vessel's master) pumping of the deep tank be necessary.

(d) When stowed in a lower hold or other compartment, the hatch covers, ventilators and pump's suction shall be effectively sealed off to prevent the escape of any leakage which may take place. Sealing off the pump's suction shall be accomplished by inserting a blank flange in way of the suction side of the bilge pump manifold.

(e) When the quantity of chemical ammunition or chemical agents in bulk exceeds the capacity of deep tanks and lower holds, other holds may be used, preference being given to other lower holds or to a tween-deck hold directly over a lower hold in which such substances are stowed.

(f) Chemical ammunition or containers of chemical agents in bulk stowed in a tween-deck shall not be stowed within 8 feet of the side of the vessel.

(g) When the quantity of chemical ammunition to be stowed on board the vessel does not justify the use of a deep tank or lower hold, a suitable tween-deck space may be selected and the ammunition stowed in a portable magazine especially constructed to prevent any leakage from the ammunition escaping outside of the magazine. Such portable magazine shall be located at least 8 feet from the ship's side.

(h) Before entering a deep tank, lower hold or other compartment containing chemical ammunition the air inside the compartment must be tested by competent personnel to ascertain if leakage has taken place. If leakage has occurred, the operation of removing the ammunition or chemical agent shall be conducted by skilled personnel, preferably representatives of the appropriate Department of Defense technical service. (CGFR 62–11, 27 F.R. 5287, June 5, 1962, as amended by CGFR 67-23, 32 F.R. 8159, June 7, 1967; CGFR 69–72, 34 F.R. 17494, Oct. 29, 1969)

$ 146.29-87 Special stowage.

Special Stowage may be on deck protected from the elements, in a deck house, mast house, mast locker or in a vacant stateroom: Provided, That such a location conforms to the distance separation rule applicable to the item so stowed and adjacent military ammunition: And provided further, That the space is ventilated and does not contain any vessel stores or machinery or equipment used during the navigation of the vessel and can be closed off from traffic while at sea. Dunnage shall be fitted to protect packages from damage by contacting any metal parts of the ship. § 146.29–89 Portable magazine stowage.

Military explosives authorized to be given portable magazine stowage by the provisions of $ 146.29–100 shall be stowed under the following conditions:

(a) Shall be located in a hold or on deck in accordance with the provisions of $ 146.29-99 and $ 146.29-100 for the particular class of military explosive stowed therein. "On deck" stowage shall also meet the requirements of § 146.29–57.

(b) Portable magazines shall be constructed of wood, or of metal lined with wood 34-inch minimum thickness, and not more than 100 cubic feet plus 10 percent of explosives (gross) shall be stowed therein.

(c) All inner surfaces of the magazine shall be smooth and free of nails, screws, or other projections.

(d) When constructed of wood the scantlings shall not be less than those required for a type “A” magazine in § 146.29–79, and a strong, close fitting hinged cover or door with an effective means of securing shall be provided.

(e) When constructed of metal, the minimum thickness of the metal shall be not less than 18-inch sheet, or formed material.

(f) Ammunition or containers of ammunition or explosives in bulk when stowed in a portable magazine shall be so stowed and secured that no displacement can occur either upwardly or laterally.

(g) When stowed on deck the magazine shall be protected from the direct rays of the sun and elements. Runners,

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