Letters from Italy in the Years 1754 and 1755

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B. White, 1773 - Italy - 267 pages
Reisebeschreibung, Großbritannien u. Italien, 18. Jahrhundert.
 

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Page 83 - I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning? quite chap-fallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favour she must come ; make her laugh at that. Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing. Hor. What's that, my lord? Ham. Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this fashion i
Page xxii - As we would wish our friends to behave towards us."' — Diogenes Laertius. Chapter XIII LIFE COMPANIONSHIP "Whenever we step out of domestic life in search of felicity, we come back again disappointed, tired, and chagrined. One day passed under our own roof, with our friends and our family, is worth a thousand in any other place.
Page 238 - I have been particularly defirous to let before you an exadt detail of thefe monthly lotteries, as they are glaring examples of the method made ufe of, to carry on and fupport the prefent government of Florence. They are let out to farmers, as are all the other branches of the grand-duke's revenue. It is true, none of the nobility are pre.fumed to throw away paolos, or zecheens, in fo low a manner.
Page 110 - The noblemen (la nobilita) stir not to the next door without a numerous attendance of lacqueys, among whom is always a running footman. They are...
Page xi - ... two miles diftant, and is one of thofe very few within my knowledge, on whom a great accefs of fortune hath made no manner of change. And particularly he is often without money, as he was before. We have got my Lord Orrery among us, being forced to continue here on the ill condition of his eftate by the knavery of an Agent ; he is a moft worthy Gentleman, whom, I hope, you will be acquainted with. I am very much obliged by your favour to Mr. P — , which, I defire, may...
Page 155 - I have seen two or three antique Busts of Alexander in the same air and posture, and am apt to think the Sculptor had in his thoughts the Conqueror's weeping for new worlds, or some other the like circumstance of his history.
Page 255 - Richecourt arrived, and the prediction of the princels was fulfilled. By a luperiority of genius, and an addrefs more adapted. to manage and turn the weighty and intricate wheels of government, the afpiring count Richecourt arofe to the higheft eminence of authority, in the fame degree that the loft prince de Craon funk into difregard and contempt. Unable to...
Page 109 - Fhrtntt, have a gloomy effect upon their waking hours; they appear melancholy. " We " are a people," fay they, " who are «« tied by the leg. We wifh to fly, but " we are detained by iron chains.
Page xxxiv - ... though he was neither a statesman nor a soldier, like the first lord Cork, the first lord Orrery, and his own father; the rival of Palladio, like the late lord Burlington ; or the rival of Bacon, like Mr. Robert Boyle ; yet in a general taste for literature, or^ as they are commonly called, polite studies, he was by no means inferior to his ancestors.
Page 250 - Miftrefs, who only infifted on a hufband, to fcreen the honour of her father's houfe. On fuch occafions hufbands are feldom difficult to be found. A young Officer of high birth, the Prince de Craon, was chofen for her confort : he received her with all the ardour of love, and with an implicit obedience to his Matter's commands.

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