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4.67377:96-60/PT)

PATENT POLICY

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CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF WITNESSES

JULY 23, 1979

Bremer, Howard W., patent counsel, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation;

and Dr. Willard Marcy, vice president, Research Corp ........

Prepared statement ..........

Attachment .............

Johnson, R. Tenney ............

Prepared statement

McCloskey, Peter F., president, Electronic Industry Association; Karl G. Harr,

Jr., president, Aerospace Industries Association of America, Inc.; Hugh E.

Witt, director, Government Liaison, United Technologies Corp., and Harold

K. Lonsdale, president, Bend Research, Inc

Prepared statement of Mr. McCloskey

Prepared statement of Mr. Harr

Prepared statement of Mr. Lonsdale ........

Mossinghoff, Gerald J., Deputy General Counsel, NASA; and James E. Denny,

Assistant General Counsel for Patents, Department of Energy .....

Prepared statement of Mr. Mossinghoff ...........

Prepared statement of Mr. Denny ....

JULY 27, 1979

Opening statement by Senator Stevenson

Arnold, Tom, president, American Patent Law Association, Arnold, White &

Durkee.....................

Prepared statement ..........

.................

Burkard, Herbert G., corporate patent counsel, Raychem Corp

Prepared statement ..

Lemelson, Jerome H., president, Licensing Management Corp................

Lodge, Gerald A., chairman, Innoven Capital Corp

Manbeck, H. F., Jr., general patent counsel, General Electric Co.

Prepared statement ..........

Attachment ...

Rabinow, Jacob, consultant, National Bureau of Standards, Department of

Commerce ..............

Prepared statement .............................................................

OCTOBER 25, 1979

Opening statement by Senator Stevenson .............

Opening statement by Senator Schmitt ...........

Armstrong, Marshall J., assistant general manager, energy and instruments

group, Thermo Electron Corp.; accompanied by James Neal, corporate

counsel.................

Prepared statement

Church, Dale W., Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition

Policy, Department of Defense; accompanied by Walter Henderson, staff

assistant ....

Prepared statement ....................................................

Rabinow, Jacob ............

Rickover, Adm. H. G., Deputy Commander for Nuclear Propulsion, Naval Sea

Systems Command, Department of the Navy ...

Questions of Senator Schmitt and the answers thereto ..........

Questions of Senator Long and the answers thereto.........

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ADDITIONAL ARTICLES, LETTERS, AND STATEMENTS Arnold, Tom, American Patent Law Association, letters of:

May 31, 1979............

August 8, 1979...
Brennan, Bruce J., Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association, letter of Sep-

tember 12, 1979..
Doud, Wallace C., International Business Machines Corp., letter of August 6,

1979 .........

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Draft Report on Policy ............
Harbridge House Study of Government Patent Policy, synopsis .........
Industrial Research Institute, position statement on the U.S. patent

system............................
Kempf, Robert F., Assistant General Counsel for Patent Matters, NASA, letter

of June 19, 1979 ......... Koogle, Herbert G., chairman, National Society of Professional Engineers,

letter of July 31, 1979......
Lemelson, Jerome H., Licensing Management Corp., letter of August 14,

1979 ............
Letter of July 18, 1979 (name withheld by request) ....
Manbeck, H. F., Jr., General Electric Co., letter of July 2, 1979 ..
National Association of Manufacturers, statement.
Rickover, Adm. H. G., statement to the:
Monopoly Subcommittee of the Senate Small Business Committee, Decem-

ber 19, 1977 .........
Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Senate Committee on the Judici-

ary, June 6, 1979......
Science and Industry, Challenges of Antagonistic interdependence, article by

Peter Drucker .....
Staats, Elmer B., Comptroller General of the United States, letter of July 17,

1979 .........................
Stacy, Gardner W., American Chemical Society, letter of August 17, 1979 ........
Stewart, Charles W., president, Machinery & Allied Products Institute, letter of

August 23, 1979 ..

PATENT POLICY

MONDAY, JULY 23, 1979

U.S. SENATE, COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION, SUBCOMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SPACE,

Washington, D.C. The subcommittee met at 9:30 a.m., in room 235, Russell Senate Office Building, Hon. Adlai E. Stevenson (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

OPENING STATEMENT BY SENATOR STEVENSON Senator STEVENSON. America's leadership in technology has often resulted from the Government's role as a supporter of research and development and consumer of its results. As distasteful as the notion may be to believers in the omnipotence of free enterprise and the irrelevance of Government, our most innovation and competitive industries are those which have benefited most from Government involvement-aerospace, electronics, telecommunications, and agriculture.

Now with productivity stagnating, inflation accelerating, our competitive position in world markets eroding, and the need for energy development pressing, the Government is uncertain about new technological initiatives and continues to impose barriers to Government-industry collaboration.

In May I introduced with Senator Cannon and Senator Schmitt the National Technology Innovation Act. The subcommittee held hearings in June. Today we begin hearings on the Science and Technology Research and Development Utilization Policy Act, a bill introduced by Senator Schmitt to establish a uniform policy for determining the rights of the Government, its contractors and employees to exploit publicly financed inventions.

The Federal research budget of $29 billion represents half of the Nation's total investment in R. & D. and generates more than 10,000 invention disclosures a year. The Government acquires title to the vast majority of inventions whose ownership and usage rights are determined, but less than 10 percent of the Government's portfolio has been licensed to private producers. Less than 5 percent of Government-owned inventions are used commercially.

For energy development, health care and transportation improvement, civilian applications of military and space R. & D., and a variety of other domestic purposes, the Government depends largely on private markets to commercialize the technology it develops. Government financing of the R. & D. does not eliminate the risks to private investors in turning these inventions into marketa

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