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Art. 637. Consolidated accounts of related trades owned by same in. terests. Subdivision (d) of section 240 provides that in any case of two or more related trades or businesses (whether incorporated or not, and whether organized in the United States or not), owned or controlled directly or indirectly by the same interests, the Commissioner may, and at the request of the taxpayer shall, consolidate the accounts of such related trades or businesses, if necessary in order to make an accurate distribution or apportionment of gains, profits, income, deductions, or capital between or among such related trades or businesses. This provision relates not to the payment of taxes, but to the determination of the true income of related trades or businesses and thus indirectly to the amount of taxes which may be due under Title II of the statute.

Art. 638. Different fiscal years of affiliated corporations. In the case of all consolidated returns the consolidated net income must be computed on the basis of the taxable year of the parent or principal reporting corporation. Whenever the fiscal year of one or more subsidiary or other affiliated corporations differs from the fiscal year of the parent or principal corporation, the Commissioner should be fully advised by the taxpayer in order that provision may be made for assessing the tax in respect of the period prior to the beginning of the fiscal year of the parent or principal corporation. See section 226 of the statute and article 431.

TIME AND PLACE FOR FILING CORPORATE RETURNS

SEC. 241. (a) Returns of corporations shall be made at the same time as is provided in subdivision (a) of section 227, except that in the case of foreign corporations not having any office or place of business in the United States returns shall be made at the same time as provided in section 227 in the case of a nonresident alien individual.

(b) Returns shall be made to the collector of the district in which is located the principal place of business or principal office or agency of the corporation, or, if it has no principal place of business or principal office or agency in the United States, then to the collector at Baltimore, Maryland.

ART. 651. Time and place for filing returns.-Returns of income must be made on or before the fifteenth day of the third month following the close of the fiscal or calendar year, as provided in section 227 of the statute and articles 441–446. In the case of foreign corporations not having any office or place of business in the United States, however, returns shall be made on or before the fifteenth day of the sixth month following the close of the fiscal year, or, if the return is made on the basis of the calendar year, then, on or before June 15. A corporation going into liquidation during any taxable year may upon the completion of such liquidation prepare a return covering its income for the fractional part of the year during which it was engaged in business and may immediately file such return with the collector. A corporation having an office or agency in the United States must make its return to the collector of the district in which is located its principal office or agency. Other corporations must make their returns to the collector at Baltimore.

TAXES ON INSURANCE COMPANIES

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SEC. 242. When used in this title the term “ life insurance company an insurance company engaged in the business of issuing life insurance and annuity contracts (including contracts of combined life, health, and accident insurance), the reserve funds of which held for the fulfillment of such contracts comprise more than 50 per centum of its total reserve funds.

Sec. 243. In lieu of the taxes imposed by sections 230 and 700, there shall be levied, collected, and paid for each taxable year upon the net income of every life insurance company a tax as follows:

(1) In the case of a domestic life insurance company, the same percentage of its net income as is imposed upon other corporations by section 230;

(2) In the case of a foreign life insurance company, the same percentage of its net income from sources within the United States as is imposed upon the net income of other corporations by section 230.

ART. 661. Life insurance companies.-Life insurance companies, as defined in section 242, are subject to the tax imposed by section 243, in lieu of the taxes imposed by sections 230 and 700 of the statute. The rate for 1924 and for subsequent years is 124 per cent, as in the case of other corporations, but the net income upon which the tax is imposed differs from the net income of other corporations. Insurance companies are entitled to the benefit of section 206 (net losses) but not of section 208 (capital gains and losses). All provisions of the statute and of these regulations not inconsistent with the specific provisions of sections 242 ta 245, inclusive, are applicable to the assessment and collection of this tax, and life insurance companies are subject to the same penalties as are provided in the case of returns and payment of income tax by other corporations. In determining whether an insurance company is a “ life insurance company as defined in section 242, no reserve shall be regarded as held for the fulfillment of life insurance and annuity contracts unless the company is entitled to a deduction from gross income on account thereof under the provisions of section 245(a) (2) and article 681. As to foreign companies see section 245(c) and article 687.

SEC. 244. (a) In the case of a life insurance company the term “ come means the gross amount of income received during the taxable year from interest, dividends, and rents.

(b). The term reserve funds required by law” includes, in the case of assessment insurance, sums actually deposited by any company or association with State or Territorial officers pursuant to law as guaranty or reserve funds, and any funds maintained under the charter or articles of incorpora

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tion of the company or association exclusively for the payment of claims arising under certificates of membership or policies issued upon the assessment plan and not subject to any other use.

ART. 671. Gross income of life insurance companies.—Net income in the case of life insurance companies is gross income from interest, dividends, and rents less the deductions allowed by section 245. Gross income comprises items 25–34, inclusive, of the income page of the annual statement for life companies (edition of 1920) adopted by the National Convention of Insurance Commissioners and items 23–30, inclusive, of the income page of the annual statement for miscellaneous stock companies if any other branches of the insurance business are conducted by the company; except that the rental value of the space occupied by the company in its own building or buildings if included in gross income shall be determined according to the provisions of section 245 (b) and article 686. As to reserve funds required by law," see article 681.

SEC. 245. (a) In the case of a life insurance company the term “net income ” means the gross income less

(1) The amount of interest received during the taxable year which under paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) of section 213 is exempt from taxation under this title;

(2) An amount equal to the excess, if any, over the deduction specified in paragraph (1) of this subdivision, of 4 per centum of the mean of the reserve funds required by law and held at the beginning and end of the taxable year, plus (in case of life insurance companies issuing policies covering life, health, and accident insurance combined in one policy issued on the weekly premium payment plan, continuing for life and not subject to cancellation) 4 per centum of the mean of such reserve funds (not required by law) held at the beginning and end of the taxable year, as the Commissioner finds to be necessary for the protection of the holders of such policies only;

(3) The amount received as dividends (A) from a domestic corporation other than a corporation entitled to the benefits of section 262, and other than a corporation organized the China Trade Act, 1922, or (B) from any foreign corporation when it is shown to the satisfaction of the Commissioner that more than 50 per centum of the gross income of such foreign corporation for the three-year period ending with the close of its taxable year preceding the declaration of such dividends (or for such part of such period as the foreign corporation has been in existence) was derived from sources within the United States as determined under section 217;

(4) An amount equal to 2 per centum of any sums held at the end of the taxable year as a reserve for dividends (other than dividends payable during the year following the taxable year) the payment of which is deferred for a period of not less than five years from the date of the policy contract;

(5) Investment expenses paid during the taxable year: Provided, That if any general expenses are in part' assigned to or included in the investment expenses, the total deduction under this paragraph shall not exceed one-fourth of 1 per centum of the book value of the mean of the invested assets held at the beginning and end of the taxable year;

(6) Taxes and other expenses paid during the taxable year exclusively upon or with respect to the real estate owned by the company, not including taxes assessed against local benefits of a kind tending to increase the value of the property assessed, and not including any amount paid out for new buildings, or for permanent improvements or betterments made to increase the value of any property. The deduction allowed by this paragraph shall be allowed in the case of taxes imposed upon a shareholder of a company úpon his interest as share holder, which are paid by the company without reimbursement from the shareholder, but in such cases no deduction shall be allowed the shareholder for the amount of such taxes;

(7) A reasonable allowance for the exhaustion, wear and tear of property, including a reasonable allowance for obsolescence;

(8) All interest paid or accrued within the taxable year on its indebtedness, except on indebtedness incurred or continued to purchase or carry obligations or securities (other than obligations of the United States issued after September 24, 1917, and originally subscribed for by the taxpayer) the interest upon which is wholly exempt from taxation under this title; and

(9) In the case of a domestic life insurance company, the net income of which (computed without the benefit of this paragraph) is $25,000 or less, the sum of $2,000; but if the net income is more than $25,000 the tax imposed by section 243 shall not exceed the tax which would be payable if the $2,000 credit were allowed, plus the amount of the net income in excess of $25,000.

(b) No deduction shall be made under paragraphs (6) and (7) of subdivision (a) on account of any real estate owned and occupied in whole or in part by a life insurance company unless there is included in the return of gross income the rental value of the space so occupied. Such rental value shall be not less than a sum which in addition to any rents received from other tenants shall provide a net income (after deducting taxes, depreciation, and all other expenses) at the rate of 4 per centum per annum of the book value at the end of the taxable year of the real estate so owned or occupied.

(c) In the case of a foreign life insurance company the amount of its net income for any taxable year from sources within the United States shall be the same proportion of its net income for the taxable year from sources within and without the United States, which the reserve funds required by law and held by it at the end of the taxable year upon business transacted within the United States is of the reserve funds held by it at the end of the taxable year upon all business transacted.

ART. 681. Reserve funds.—Under paragraphs (1) and (2) of section 245(a), life insurance companies are entitled to deduct from gross income: (1) Interest which is exempted in the case of other taxpayers by section 213(b) (4) and articles 74–82; and (2) the excess, if any, of the reserve deduction specified in section 245(a) (2) over the amount of such interest. The reserve deduction is based upon the reserves required by express statutory provisions or by the rules and regulations of the State insurance departments when promulgated in the exercise of a power conferred by statute; but such reserves do not include assets required to be held for the ordinary running expenses of the business nor do they include the reserve or net value of risks reinsured in other solvent companies to the extent of the reinsurance. In the case of life insurance companies issuing policies covering life, health, and accident insurance combined in one policy issued on the weekly premium payment plan, continuing for life and not subject to cancellation, it is required that reserves thereon be based upon recognized tables of experience covering disability benefits of the kind contained in policies issued by this particular class of companies. Reserves“ maintained to provide for the ordinary running expenses of a business, definite in amount, and which must be currently paid by every company from its income if its business is to continue, such as taxes, salaries, reinsurance, and unpaid brokerage” (Maryland Casualty Co. v. United States, 251 U. S., 342), will not be considered. A company is permitted to make use of the highest aggregate reserve called for by any State in which it transacts business, but the reserve must have been actually held as shown by the annual statement. Generally speaking, the following will be considered reserves as contemplated by the law: Items 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11 of the liability page of the annual statement for life companies, and items 16, 17, 18, 19, and 26 of the liability page of the annual statement for miscellaneous stock companies, if a life insurance company is also transacting other kinds of insurance business. If other reserves are claimed, sufficient information must be filed with the return to enable the Commissioner to determine the validity of the claim. Reference should be made to the item in which the reserve appears in the annual statement and to the State statute or insurance department ruling requiring that such reserves be held. Only reserves which are so required, which are peculiar to insurance companies, and which are dependent upon interest earnings for their maintenance, will be considered.

ART. 682. Reserve for deferred dividends. The deduction for deferred dividends under section 245(a) (4) will be based upon item 37 of the liability page of the annual statement for life companies but shall not include any dividend payable during the year immediately following the taxable year.

ART. 683. Investment expenses.--If any general expenses are in part assigned to or included in the investment expenses, the total investment expenses (other than taxes and expenses with respect to real estate) allowable as a deduction shall not exceed one-quarter of 1 per cent of the mean of the book value of the invested assets held at the beginning and end of the taxable year. If there be no allocation of general expenses to investment expenses the deduction may consist of investment expenses actually paid during the taxable year, in which case an itemized schedule of such expenses must be appended to the return. The invested assets are items 1-6, inclusive, item 9, and items 10 and 11 (if interest-bearing assets) of the asset page of the annual statement for life companies, and items 1-4, inclusive, item 7, and items 27–30, inclusive (if interest-bearing assets), of the asset page of the annual statement for miscellaneous stock companies.

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