STUDENT LIFE; LETTERS AND RECOLLECTIONS FOR A YOUNG FRIEND.

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Page 91 - Its loveliness increases ; it will never Pass into nothingness ; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing A flowery band to bind us to the earth...
Page 141 - I must work the works of Him that sent Me while it is day, for the night cometh when no man can work d ." Two doctrines, both of them distinctly Christian, throw their guardian shadows over the lesson.
Page 1 - So, well accorded, forth they rode together In friendly sort, that lasted but a while; And of all old dislikes they made faire weather : Yet all was forg'd and spred with golden foyle, That under it hidde hate and hollow guyle. Ne certes can that friendship long endure, However gay and goodly be the style, That doth ill cause or evill end enure : For vertue is the band that bindeth harts most sure.
Page 37 - I remember with especial pleasure our evenings with Chaucer and Spenser at Professor Edward T. Channing's study. How his genial face shone in the light of the winter's fire, and threw new meaning upon the rare gems of thought and humor and imagination of those kings of ancient song.
Page 95 - There is in human nature, generally, more of the fool than of the wise; and therefore those faculties by which the foolish part of mens'minds is taken, are most potent.
Page 58 - ... experiment As to hours of study, they should never exceed those now made the limit of manual labor — ten hours — and I believe that six hours of close application will in the long run accomplish more good work than twelve hours. If a youth actually studies six hours, and adds to this the time spent in going to and from recitation and in waiting for others to recite, he will find very little of the working part of the day left If we add to six hours of actual work over books the time usually...
Page 58 - ... this the time spent in going to and from recitation and in waiting for others to recite, he will find very little of the working part of the day left If we add to six hours of actual work over books the time usually given by an earnest student to thought, and reading, and instructive conversation, it will be found that twelve out of the twenty-four hours are generally given to the culture of the mind. Stating my views in another way, I can say that there is wisdom in dividing the day into three...
Page 129 - Brothers, claffmates, with the dawn Of the morrow we are gone, And Life's broad ocean lies All before us!
Page 57 - ... retire and rise an hour later. As to any considerable study before breakfast, I do not recommend it, and am inclined to think as poorly of morning candle-light as of the midnight lamp. I tried once to steal time for translating a work from the German by early morning study, and the symptoms of a nervous fever that appeared in the course of a few weeks led me never to repeat the experiment As to hours of study, they should never exceed those now made the limit of manual labor — ten hours —...

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