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PART II. ENGLISH.

SELDENIANA

WALPOLE'S REMINISCENCES

WALPOLIANA

JOHNSONIANA

OMNIANA (SOUTHEY's)

165

181

194

231

277

PART III. ITALIAN..GERMAN.

POGGIANA

LUTHER'S COLLOQUIA MENSALIA

ALPHABETICAL INDEX

299

311

321

PREFACE

The taste for those collections which, unider the title of Ana, form so conspicuous and so interesting a portion of French literature, is both of high antiquity, and wide extent. The same blending of moral apothegms, of critical remarks, of serious and comic aneca dotes, of seientific or literary information, which distinguishes the French And, is to be traced, more or less modified by natural haibits, and the state of human knowledge, in the Nasr Eddin, the Bassiri, and Tendai of the Turks and Arabians, in the Memorabilia of Plato and Xenophon, in the Enchiridion of Arrian, and in the Noctes Atticæ of Au lus Gellius. The Bons Mots of Cicerowe know were compiled by no less a person than Julius Cæsar, while another collection of his good things, we are told by Quinctilian', was made by a freedmani under the title, De Join cis Ciceronis. Quinctilian himself has faw voured us with not a few specimens of the Roman Orator's jocular vein, from which

we may fairly conclude, that these collections of his sayings would have borne no inconsiderable resemblance to the comic portion of the Menagiana,

In modern Italy the taste for such collections seems to have been not less general. Of the older works of this class little is known; though there is every reason to think that the Facetic and Poggiana of Poggio were by no means the earliest works of the kind. Many of the novels of Boccaccio are merely repartees and remarks attributed to celebrated persons, in the style of the Poggiana, and the collection attributed to Æneas Sylvius Piccolomini; and nearly one half of the tales of Sacchetti are composed

of anecdotes of this kind. The Facetiæ of Poggio, however, is the only Italian work of this class which is generally known. It embodies the scandal of the time, and the coarsely licentious, but often singularly comic tales and anecdotes, with which Poggio and the other clerks of the Roman Chancery used to amuse themselves in an apartment of the Vatican, to which they had given the appropriate name of the Buggiale, or as Poggio himself translates it, Mendaciorum Officina. Unfortunately, the best articles in that collection are so strongly tinctured with coarseness or obscenity, that few specimens of it can be exhibited in translation..

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