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VIEWED IN THE LIGHT

REASON, REVELATION, AND HISTORY,

WITH

SKETCHES OF ITS LITERATURE.

BY THE REV. JAMES GILFILLAN,

STIRLING, SCOTLAND.

WE ARE TO ACCOUNT THE SANCTIFICATION OF ONE DAY IN SEVEN A DUTY WHICH

GOD'S IMMUTABLE LAW DOTH EXACT FOR EVER.-HOOKER.

PUBLISHED BY THE
AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,

150 NASSAU-STREET, NEW YORK :

AND THE

NEW YORK SABBATH COMMITTEE,

21 BIBLE HOUSE, ASTOR PLACE.

THE stereotype plates of this volume were generously presented to the New York Sabbath Committee, by John HENDERSON, Esq., of Glasgow, Scotland. In issuing it without revision, neither that Committee nor the Publishing Committee assume the responsibility of any sentiment that may have the aspect of denominational controversy.

“The first creature of God in the works of the days was the light of the sense, the last was the light of reason, and his Sabbath work ever since is the illumination of his Spirit.”

LORD Bacon.

PREFACE.

The author of the following work accounts it his happiness to have been connected from his earliest days with a class, of whom the sacred observance of the Lord's Day has been a prominent distinction. That there have been among them no insincere characters, presenting a distorted image of their creed, it would be too much to affirm; but sure he is, that both ministers and private individuals, with whom, from his circumstances, he has been brought into intercourse, have been, for the most part, upright, holy, kind-hearted, cheerful Christians, with whom, he had reason to believe, it would be good for him to live and die. Of persons in sacred office, there rise to his view, his relative, Mr. Barlas, Crieff ; Dr. Pringle and Mr. Black, Perth ; Mr. Jameson, Methven ; Mr. Beath, Pitcairn Green ; Dr. Mitchell, Anderston, afterwards of Glasgow ; Dr. Ferrier, Paisley ; Dr. Jamieson and Professor Paxton, Edinburgh ; Mr. Culbertson, Leith. Others, who occupied a less public station, he must not name; but he sees them attending to the claims of their fellow-creatures equally as to their own affairs—visiting the poor and suffering—sitting by their bed-sides with the impression that a dying immortal is near, and with the tear and the tone of sympathy—tending the steps of the aged and the neglected showing in their countenances

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the serenity and benevolence which they have catched from the face of the Saviour—their very steps indicating that they

"Walk thoughtful on the silent, solemn shore

Of that vast ocean we must sail so soon.”

His education among such persons, with the circumstance that his father had published an “Essay" on the subject, gave him an early interest in the Sabbath. The work, which is the result, has for years employed those moments which he could spare from the duties of a laborious profession. His own collection of books that treated of the institution, though ultimately of some extent, being insufficient for his purpose, he has had to draw upon various public libraries. For securing him access to their treasures, or for otherwise aiding his researches, he is under great obligations to Professors Pillans, Edinburgh, and Fleming, Glasgow; Messrs. George Offor, and William H. Black, London ; Mr. Haig, Dublin ; and the Rev. Alex. B. Grosart, Kinross : and to the librarians, the Rev. A. L. Simpson, Messrs. Small, Laing, Halkett (Edinburgh), Jones (Glasgow), and Christie (Innerpeffray), he is indebted for manifold acts of attention and kindness. He may be allowed to express special gratitude for the encouraging interest shown, and the various assistance rendered, in connexion with

i of public libraries, the writer found those of the British Museum and the Edinburgh University to be the richest in Sabbatic literature. In the Advocates' Library, and that of the University of Glasgow, he met with works on the subject which he had not discovered anywhere else in Scotland. The library of the United Presbyterian Church is peculiarly valuable in the department of Theology, which it owes in no small measure to the portion of it that belonged to the learned Robertson of Kilmarnock, and has a select number of volumes on the Sabbath. The most extensive and valuable collection of books and pamphlets relative to the institution that he has had the opportunity of seeing was that of Mr. W. H. Black, minister of a Sabbatarian Church, London, and an accomplished scholar. He regretted that with the most liberal permission to make use of it on the spot, the rule of the Library, which precluded the removal of any book from the premises, and his limited time, put it out of his power to derive much benefit froin its stores.

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