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Captain WILLIAMs. For all aviation cadets entering the program In OW. Mr. BATEs. Entering the program now? Captain WILLIAMs. Yes, sir; not retroactive. - Mr. BATEs. You won't convert any contracts presently in existence? Captain WILLIAMs. No, sir; we won't. Mr. KILDAY. Is there anything further on this bill? Mr. HUDDLESTON. Mr. Chairman. Mr. KILDAY. Mr. Huddleston. Mr. HUDDLESTON. Captain, tell me something; what was the reason for the language in the present law of at least 4 years? Why was that phrased in those terms? Captain WILLIAMs. That was not at least 4 years; it was not more than 4 vears. Mr. HUDDLESTON. Why was it phrased in those particular terms? Captain WILLIAMs. I think possibly, Mr. Huddleston, that is because that was the normal enlistment in the other services, 4 years. The flight training program at that time was 12 months, basically. Mr. GAviN. Are you through Mr. HUDDLESTON. Yes. Mr. GAv IN. Mr. Chairman. Mr. KILDAY. Mr. Gavin. Mr. GAv IN. Would you proceed from the time the boy enlists and tell us what he does owhat you want him to do? Captain WILLIAMs. Yes, sir, Mr. Gavin. We would want to— *: GAv IN. Now from the time the boy enlists. He is going in now, tell us. Captain WILLIAMs. The boy enlists and enters the flight training program as a naval aviation cadet. The present training program— Mr. GAv IN. For what period of time? Captain WILLIAMs. The present training program requires 18 months, sir. Mr. GAv IN. Right. Captain WILLIAMs. We need at least 3 years after that—after he completes flight training in order for us to get equitable returns on our investment of time and energy in training the man and the cost of the training program. Mr. GAviN. That is another year and a half. Captain WILLIAMs. No, sir. Mr. GAVIN. You say you would need at least 3 years? Captain WILLIAMs. Three years. Mr. GAvLN. So that would be another year and a half? Captain WILLIAMs. Three years after completion of flight trainIng, Sir. Mr. GAvi N. Well— Captain WILLIAMs. After completion of flight training. Mr. GAv IN. After he completes, you need 3 years more, all right. Captain WILLIAMs. At least 3 years, yes, sir. Mr. GAvi N. Then he is in 41% years? Captain WILLIAMs. That is the minimum time that we would enlist him for, yes, sir. Mr. GAVIN. What do you want him to do now, extend that, or what does this bill do?

Captain WILLIAMS. This bill extends it from a total enlistment, Mr. Gavin, of not more than 4 years, from the time he enters, to not less than 3 years after completion of flight training.

Mr. Gavin. Do you think that is adequate time after we invest $100,000 in his training?

Captain WILLIAMS. We would like to get much more time, sir.

Mr. Gavin. Then why didn't you ask for it? There is an inclination, I think, on the part of Members of Congress and a great many of them are interested in the tremendous investment we make in education of these youth in these various programs, that they remain in the service and we have tried with the military pay increase legislation to make it attractive enough.

That is the point I was trying to make, why is it so difficult for you to retain these men and necessary for us to enact legislation to continue them in the service for a greater length of time?

Captain WILLIAMS. We are in hopes, Mr. Gavin

Mr. Gavin. What percentage of them stay with you and go into the regular department?

Captain WILLIAMS. At the present time I think that percentage is about 25 percent, sir, that remain-are selected and remain in the Reg. ular Navy. About 16 to 18 percent remain on active duty as Reserves.

Mr. BLANDFORD. That is an increase from what it has been in the

past?

Captain WILLIAMS. Yes, sir.
Mr. BLANDFORD. A considerable increase.

Captain WILLIAMS. We would hope that this bill will help retain these individuals for longer periods of time.

Mr. BLANDFORD. May I make one observation, Mr. Gavin? This bill says not less than 3 years after completing training. If the Navy should find that they have to keep these people for 4 years on active duty to complete the 2 active duty tours that are necessary for the efficiency of the Navy, the bill would permit them to do it.

Mr. GUBSER. It would ?
Mr. BLANDFORD. Yes.
Captain WILLIAMS. This law would permit us to do that.

Mr. BLANDFORD. This bill would permit them to extend it to 4 or 5 years if necessary.

Mr. HUDDLESTON. Or 20.
Mr. BLANDFORD. Yes.

Captain WILLIAMS. Our present time, Mr. Chairman, is 312 years for all of our other programs. This bill would permit us.

Mr. Kilpay. If you should find it necessary to increase the training period from 18 months to 2 years or any other period of time, it would not come out of his active duty obligation, because it is a net obligation after commission, rather than a total obligation from the time of entry.

Captain WILLIAMS. That is correct.

Mr. Gubser. Am I to understand, Mr. Chairman, that 3 years in a great many cases will not give time enough for 2 complete tours? Is it 31%, usually!

Captain WILLIAMS. At the present time, sir, it is 312 years. This bill would last for not less than 3 years.

Mr. Bates. What do you actually expect to do, Captain?

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Captain WILLIAMs. We expect 3% years after completion of flight training.

Mr. BATEs. Plus the 18 months?

Captain WILLIAMs. Yes, sir.

Mr. KILDAY. Thank you, Captain.

The next will be H. R. 7706, by Mr. Norrell of Arkansas, a bill to retire members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps retired after 30 years' service to retired pay equal to 75 percent of the monthly basic pay authorized for the highest enlisted, warrant, or commissioned grade in which they served satisfactorily during World War I, and for other purposes.

(The bill is as follows:)

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A BILL To entitle members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps retired after thirty years' service to retired pay equal to 75 per centum of the monthly basic pay authorized for the highest enlisted, warrant, or commissioned grade in which they served satisfactorily during World War I, and for other purposes

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That effective April 1, 1955, members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps retired before or after the date of enactment of this Act with thirty years' service (including credit for double time) are entitled to the maximum retired pay now or hereafter provided for the grade in which retired or for the highest enlisted, warrant, or commissioned officer grade in which they served satisfactorily during World War I. SEc. 2. Members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps retired before the date of enactment of this Act who were advanced on the retired list to the highest warrant or commissioned grade in which they served satisfactorily during World War I but who were restored on their application to their former enlisted grade on the retired list, are entitled to be advanced on the retired list to the highest warrant or commissioned grade in which they satisfactorily served during World War I. SEC. 3. No person is entitled to retired pay or advancement on the retired list under this Act unless he makes application to the Secretary concerned within one year after the date of enactment of this Act. Mr. KILDAY. I will submit the following statement: The purpose of this legislation is to entitle members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps retired after 30 years' service to retired pay equal to 75 percent of the monthly basic pay authorized for the highest enlisted, warrant, or commissioned grade in which they served satisfactorily during World War I. Individuals who enlisted before August 25, 1912, are given double credit for certain service performed by them outside the continental limits of the United States in computing their length of service for purposes of retirement. Individuals who received such credit and who served creditably in World War I were entitled to be advanced on the retired list to the highest commissioned, warrant, or enlisted grade held by them during that war. However, no increase in retired pay was authorized by reason of such advancement. Subsequently, provision was made that enlisted men with double-time credit would be entitled to the maximum retired pay then or thereafter authorized for the grade in which they were retired. In addition, retired enlisted men were authorized to receive retired pay computed on the basis of the commissioned officer grade to which they were advanced. The Comptroller General held, however, that in computing the retired pay of a retired enlisted man on the basis of

the commissioned officer grade to which he has been advanced, doubletime credit could not be counted as that credit may be counted only in computing length of service for the purpose of qualifying for retirement (29 Comp. Gen. 220). In view of this decision, a small group of retired enlisted men who were advanced to a commissioned officer grade elected to be restored on the retired list to their former enlisted grade because of the higher retirement pay. - - Section 2 (iii), Career Incentive Act of 1955–Sixty-ninth United States Statutes at Large, page 22–authorizes the counting of doubletime credit in computing the retired pay of a retired enlisted man on the basis of the commissioned officer grade to which he was advanced under the act of May 7, 1932–Forty-seventh United States Statutes at Large, page 150. The proposed legislation permits those persons who elected to be restored to their former enlisted grade, as noted above, and who thereby received no benefit from the 1955 act, to have their retired pay recomputed, with credit for double time, on the basis of the highest grade satisfactorily held during World War I and authorizes their being readvanced upon the retired list to that grade. The Department of the Army favors enactment of the proposed legislation and the Bureau of the Budget interposes no objection. he statement could have contained a statement to the effect I had offered each one of those amendments over a period of perhaps 12 to 14 years in an attempt to secure recognition of this group of enlisted }]]en. Mr. BATEs. Why were they turned down? Mr. KILDAY. Mainly because they had served prior to 1912, and there was nobody left in the active duty status who knew anything about them or cared much about them. Mr. GAviN. How many in this group? Mr. KILDAY. I don’t know. Mr. GAVIN. Can you give just an estimate? Mr. KILDAY. Let me tell you who they are. They were those men who served as enlisted men in the Regular Army prior to 1912 and had served outside the continental United States and, therefore, got doubletime credit toward retirement. Then of that number, those who received commissions during World War I and at the end of World War I, practically all of them reverted to enlisted status, some retired. Then in 1932, to give them some recognition, they were permitted to retire with the title of their commissioned grade, but with the pay of a warrant officer, no matter what their grade may have been. That is just a little recognition given them. Of course, they were glad to be able to call themselves lieutenant and captain, a few of them were majors. But they never did quite understand why they had the title and why they didn't get the pay. I have never quite understood it either. Mr. BATEs. Does the chairman have a position on this bill Mr. KILDAY. There are less than a hundred living. Mr. BLANDFORD. Mr. Chairman, we have a Department witness. * KILDAY. Major Lee, the Department witness, come around, please. Mr. GAVIN. I can't understand why they would be given the rank and not the pay.

Mr. KILDAY. They never understood it either.
Mr. GAVIN. Are we acting favorably

Mr. KILDAY. What this is is the exact same thing we had in the previous bill. When it came to the election after the Career Compensation Act, there were a few of them who elected to remain enlisted men and complication has arisen. I think we ought to hear the major. I ought not to be the only advocate of the bill.

Will you please proceed with the bill?
Major LEE. Thank you.

Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, I am Maj. William F. Lee, Office of the Adjutant General, Department of the Army. The Department of the Army has been designated as the representative of the Department of Defense on this legislation.

Mr. Chairman, I have a prepared statement which I will gladly read or you may wish to insert it in the record and I will briefly discuss the proposal.

The purpose of H. R. 7706 is to permit, effective April 1, 1955, members of the Armed Forces retired before or after the date of enactment of the bill with 30 years' service—including credit for double time—to receive retired pay equal to 75 percent of the pay of the highest enlisted, warrant, or commissioned officer grade in which they served satisfactorily during World War I.

Prior to August 25, 1912, enlisted personnel were given double credit for certain service performed outside the continental limits of the United States, but only in computing their length of service for purposes of retirement, and not for the purpose of computing retired pay.

Subsequent laws permitted such personnel who had World War I service to be advanced on the retired list to the highest commissioned, warrant, or enlisted grade held, with no increase in pay. Provision was later made to entitled enlisted personnel with double-time credit to receive the maximum retired pay then or thereafter authorized for the grade in which retired.

However, in computing the pay of a retired enlisted man on the basis of the commissioned officer grade to which advanced, doubletime credit could not be counted. This resulted in cases where the individual would get less retired pay as a commissioned or warrant officer than he would as a retired enlisted man. Accordingly, a small group of retired enlisted men, advanced to a commissioned grade, elected to be restored to their former enlisted grade in order to receive higher retirement pay.

The Career Incentive Act of 1955 authorized the counting of doubletime credit in computing the retired pay of retired enlisted men on the basis of the commissioned officer grade to which advanced. However, those who had requested to be restored to enlisted status could not receive the benefit of this act as it was held that once restored to enlisted status, the individual could not later be readvanced to commissioned or warrant status.

Therefore, H. R. 7706 would permit persons who elected to be restored to their former enlisted grade, who received no benefit of the 1955 act, to be upon request readvanced and thereby have their retired pay recomputed so as to include credit for double time on the basis of the highest grade satisfactorily held in World War I.

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