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range requirements for the reorganized Reserve components. The funds available for the two fiscal years 1958 and 1959 break down as follows:

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Construction requirements for the Army Reserves are determined as follows:

The Army Reserve units are allocated to the Army commanders who in turn "station” these units in towns and cities, where they establish there will be sufficient numbers of participating reservists to fill the units to authorized strengths. Based on facilities policies, construction standards, and space criteria published by Department of the Army, the Army commanders survey their facility requirements and developed plans for the stationing and housing of the Army Reserve units. The column on the left of this chart (chart No. 1) shows, as of June 30, 1957, the total number of existing Army Reserve centers. Of the 1,925 centers, 1,783 are in leased and donated space, and 142 are standard design centers. The middle column represents facilities under construction or programed through fiscal year 1959 and those current assets that are adequate for continued use. The column on the right shows a total of 1,800 Army Reserve centers estimated to be required. There are 385 facilities constructed, under construction, or planned for construction, and 332 adequate leased and donated facilities, leaving 1,083 centers to be acquired after fiscal year 1959. The figure for "Planned acquisitions” shown in the column for "Total requirements” represents the estimated deficiency which must be provided in fiscal year 1960 and subsequent years.

The construction requirements for the National Guard are computed in a different manner. The Army does not assign National Guard units to the States. The units are offered by the Army and accepted by the States. In accepting, the States must consider their capability to man, house, and train the offered units. This next chart (chart No. 2) gives the National Guard picture. The green area represents armories provided by the States without United States Government contributions. The red area represents those State-owned facilities constructed with United States Government and State-matching funds.

On June 30, 1957, there were 2,726 National Guard armories existing. 2,089 of these have been provided wholly by the States, and 637 have been provided in part with United States Government contributions authorized by Public Law 783, 81st Congress. The middle column indicates those armories existing or programed through fiscal year 1959 and those adequate for continued use. The column on the right represents estimated total requirements of 2,250.

This chart indicates that of the ttoal estimated long-range requirement for 2,250 National Guard armories, 916 were provided by the States without United States Government contributions; and 1,100 will be provdied for during the period fiscal year 1952–59 with United States Government contributions under Public Law 783, and an estimated 234 armories remain to be funded in fiscal year 1960 and future years.

Standard designs have been prepared by the Army for those locations where new construction is required. These designs, including space criteria and construction standards, have been reviewed and accepted by the Department of Defense and the Bureau of the Budget. The States are not required to adhere to these designs. However, United States Government contributions to the States for National Guard facilities are based on approved space criteria and

construction standards. Where the States exceed these standard designs, they pay 100 percent of the applicable costs. In addition to armories, standard designs have also been prepared for nonarmory facilities, including storage, administrative, maintenance, and outdoor training facilities. The next chart (chart No. 3) shows in the solid red bars the total dollar requirements of the National Guard and Army Reserve construction programs. The total requirements, based on the revised troop program, are estimated at $531 million, distributed $191 million to the National Guard and $340 million to the Army Reserve. The blue area represents funds appropriated totaling $244 million, distributed $139 million to the National Guard and $105 million to the Army Reserve. This chart does not include: (a) An estimated $500 million State capital investment in National Guard facilities prior to enactment of Public Law 783. (b) State-matching funds. (c) $13.5 million appropriated for the Army Reserve in fiscal year 1950 prior to enactment of Public Law 783. The next chart (chart No. 4) shows the status, as of June 30, 1957, of the projects funded with the $244 million appropriated through fiscal year 1958. The National Guard Bureau has received $118 million for the construction of 1,100 armories. As of June 30, 1957, 637, estimated cost $51 million, had been completed; 295, estimated cost $41 million, were under construction; and 168 (94 in fiscal year 1958 and 74 in fiscal year 1959) are programed with available appropriations. Similar data is also shown for the $21 million provided for approximately 252 Army National Guard nonarmory projects. For the Army Reserve, $105 million have been provided under authorization of Public Law 783, 81st Congress, for construction of centers. As of June 30, 1957, 97, estimated cost of $29 million, had been completed; 83, estimated cost of $26 million, were under construction and 160 (83 in fiscal year 1958 and 77 in fiscal year 1959) are programed within $46 million ($21 million for fiscal year 1958 and $25 million for fiscal year 1959) of available appropriations. The next chart (chart No. 5) shows the Army National Guard fund availability and obligations for fiscal year 1955 through fiscal year 1959. The green line represents cumulative appropriations, the red line represents obligations, and the blue line represents expenditures. Fiscal year 1955 obligations actually incurred were slightly over $19 million and the obligations for fiscal year 1956 and fiscal year 1957 were nearly $29 million in each of the years. The chart and the budget justifications show estimated obligations of $14 million for fiscal year 1958 and $15 million in fiscal year 1959. The program as now established will allow a carryover into fiscal year 1960 of approximately $3.4 million from funds appropriated through fiscal year 1958 for the Army National Guard. The next chart (chart No. 6) shows similar information for the Army ReServe. The Army Reserve Carryover into fiscal year 1960, as shown on this chart, is estimated to be approximately $4.7 million. This carryover is required for commitments on work started in fiscal year 1959 and to permit continuation of design, land acquisition, and contract awards during the first quarter of fiscal year 1960 pending apportionment of fiscal year 1960 funds. Turning now to the matter of joint utilization, the next chart (chart No. 7) shows the National Guard picture. The column on the left represents the existing 916 State-owned armories, provided without United States Government assistance, that are considered adequate. Thirty-nine or 4 percent of these facilities are used by one or more of the other Reserve components. The Column on the right represents the 932 State-owned armories completed, or under construction, as of June 30, 1957, using in part United States Government funds. Of the 932 total, 430 or 46 percent are located in small towns where there are no other Reserve components. Two hundred twenty-three projects, or 24 percent, are for rehabilitation or modification of existing older, overcrowded armories and are not suitable for joint use. For 158 projects or 17 percent the impracticability of joint utilization has been approved by the Department of Defense. One hundred twenty-one projects or 13 percent are either used jointly or make provision for such future use. If we deduct the lower 2 groups, then 121, or 44 percent, of 279 locations are either used jointly or make plans for future joint use. Department of the Army policies require that maximum use be made of all existing facilities, including those of the other Reserve components, before new construction will be requested. Each new project is examined at the local, State, Zone of Interior, Army, and departmental level to see if there are, in fact, any existing facilities that could be used or if the proposed project could be consolidated with one of the other Heserve components. The final review is made by the Reserve Forces Facilities Committee of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Properties and Installations). This committee consists of a representative of Assistant Secretary of I)efense (Properties and Installations), Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower, Personnel, and Reserves), and each of the three military departments. The major mission of this committee is to provide the Secretary of Defense with recommendations of the development and implementation of Reserve components construction programs, including the practicability of joint utilization. The next chart (chart No. 8) shows similar data for the Army Reserve centers. The column on the left represents the 1,783 centers in use as of June 30, 1957, that were provided by funds other than those authorized by Public Law 783. These are primarily leased facilities or space provided rent free by the military services, other Government agencies, or by local communities. One hundred and eleven, or 6 percent, of these facilities are used jointly with one or more of the other Reserve components. The column on the right represents 180 centers completed or under construction as of June 30, 1957, with funds authorized by Public Law 783. Thirty-six, or 20 percent, of these projects are 3-unit (600 men) or larger, and, in accordance with Department of Defense policies, are not considered practicable for joint use. Twenty-nine, or 16 percent, are located where the other Reserve components have no construction requirement. For 86 projects, or 48 percent, the impracticability of joint use has been approved by the Department of Defense. Twenty-nine projects, or 16 percent, do provide for joint use. If we deduct the lower 2 groups, then 29, or 25 percent, of 116 locations are either used jointly or make plans for future joint use. With me, to assist in providing any additional information you may desire, are Major General McGowen, Chief of the Army Division of the National Guard Bureau, and Major General Palladino, Chief, Army Reserve and ROTC Affairs, of the Department of the Army. This concludes my statement, Mr. Chairman. use in the development of long-range plans and programs in support

Mr. BRooks. I think perhaps we better do that, because there may be another quorum call. General SIULER. Yes, sir. Mr. Chairman, the Department of Defense has given the Army revised long-range paid drill strengths for of the Reserve components. These revised troop strengths are well below those previously used and will affect our long-range facilities requirements. Expenditures limitations imposed on the Army for fiscal year 1958 and fiscal year 1959 made it necessary to reduce the fiscal year 1958 program from the $55-million level approved by the Congress. Actually, we had to reduce it to a level of $27 million for execution, instead of the $55 million as authorized by Congress. That was because of the expenditure limitations placed upon us Army-wide. The fiscal year 1958 program is currently established at $35 million in direct obligations: broken down, $14 million for the Army National Guard and $21 million for Army Reserve. I would like to state at this point, Mr. Chairman, that last March I told the committee that Secretary Brucker had asked the Secretary of Defense to restore the size of the fiscal year 1958 program to the $55-million obligational level as approved by the Congress, and had further asked that the fiscal year 1959 program be raised to the same level, that is, $55 million. You can note, sir, from my statement that what we got was a raise from the $27 million program that we were forced to cut to because of the expenditure limitations, to $35 million. So, for fiscal year 1958 we are still $20 million under the Army request to be restored to the $55 million. The carryover of funds into fiscal year 1959, that is 48.1 million— and, of course, due largely to the reduction in the fiscal year 1958 program level—will be i. to accomplish a $40 million program in fiscal year 1959. So we now have an approved level, sir, of $40 million for fiscal year 1959, instead of the $55 million request that we sent to Department of Defense. I would like to refer, sir, to the first chart. May I ask a question off the record, Mr. Chairman? The column on the left of this first chart shows as of June 30, 1957– I am on the bottom of page 3—the total number of existing Army Reserve centers. Of the 1,925 centers, 1,783 are in leased and donated space and 142 are standard design centers. The middle column represents facilities under construction or programed through fiscal year 1959 and those current assets that are adequate for continued use. The column on the right shows a total of 1,800 Army Reserve centers estimated to be of There are 385 facilities constructed, under construction, or planned for construction, and 332 adequate, leased, and donated facilities, leaving 1,083 centers to be acquired after fiscal year 1959. This next chart gives the National Guard picture. The green area represents armories provided by the States without United States Government contributions. The red area represents those State-owned facilities constructed with United States Government and State matching funds. On June 30, 1957, there were 2,726 National Guard armories existing; 2,089 of these have been provided wholly by the States and 637 have been provided in part with United States Government contributions authorized by Public Law 783, 81st Congress. The middle column indicates those armories existing or programed through fiscal year 1959 and those adequate for continued use. so column on the right represents estimated total requirements of 2,250. This chart indicates that of the total estimated long-range requirement for 2,250 National Guard armories, 916 were provided by the States without United States Government contributions and 1,100 will be provided for during the period fiscal year 1952 through 1959 with United States Government contributions under Public Law 783, and an estimated 234 armories remain to be funded in fiscal year 1960 and future years. The next chart shows in the solid red bars the total dollar requirements of the National Guard and Army Reserve construction program. The total requirements based on the revised troop program are estimated at $531 million, distributed $191 million to the National Guard and $340 million to the Army Reserve. The blue area represents funds appropriated totaling $244 million distributed $139 million to the National Guard and $105 million to the Army Reserve. The next chart shows the status as of June 30, 1957.

Of the projects funded with the $244 million appropriated through fiscal year 1958, the National Guard Bureau has received $118 million for the construction of 1,100 armories. As of June 30, 1957, 637, estimated cost $51 million, have been completed; 295, estimated cost $41 million, were under construction; and 168–94 of these in fiscal year 1958 and 74 in fiscal year 1959—are programed with available appropriations. Similar data is also . for the $21 million provided for approximately 252 Army National Guard nonarmory projects. For the Army Reserve, $105 million have been provided under authorization of Public Law 783, 81st Congress, for construction of centers. As of June 30, 1957, 97, estimated cost of $29 million, have been completed; 83, estimated cost of $26 million were under construction; and 160, broken down 83 in fiscal year 1958 and 77 in fiscal year 1959, are programed within $46 million of available appropriations. The next chart shows the Army National Guard fund availability and obligations for fiscal year 1955 through 1959. The green line represents cumulative appropriations. The red line represents obligations. And the blue line represents expenditures. Fiscal year 1955 obligations actually incurred were slightly over $19 million, and the obligations for fiscal year 1956 and 1957 were nearly $29 million in each of the years. The chart and the budget justifications show estimated obligations of $14 million for fiscal year 1958 and $15 million in fiscal year 1959. The program as now established will allow a carryover into fiscal year 1960 of approximately $3.4 million from funds appropriated through fiscal year 1958 for the Army National Guard. The next chart shows similar information for the Army Reserve. The Army Reserve carryover into fiscal year 1960, as shown on this chart, is estimated to be approximately $4.7 million. This carryover is required for commitments on work started in fiscal year 1959 and to permit continuation of design, land acquisition and contract awards, during the first 3 months .#. year 1960, pending the apportionment of fiscal year 1960 funds. Mr. Chairman, I have with me this afternoon representatives from the Chief of the Army Division of the National Guard Bureau, and from the Chief, Army Reserve and ROTC Affairs, and this concludes the briefing of my statement, sir, and I stand ready to give the committee any information desired. Mr. BRooks. Suppose the committee would place in the bill an item covering additional construction for the Guard and the Reserve. Has the Army any program at all that would be needed or would be available in the event that this were done? General SHULER. Well, Mr. Chairman, the Army has submitted to the Department of Defense—and I understand that they are under a request from this committee to submit to this committee—we have submitted 125 percent in dollar amounts of projects of the total moneys appropriated which we have available to carry out the fiscal 1958 and 1959 program, and that is $83 million. So we have projects submitted which have already been consulted with the Congress and approved, of 125 percent times $83 million.

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