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Valencia, onions, acreage, etc.

101
Veal, market review...

Each issue.
Vegetables-
Colorado, markets, etc...

120, 216, 248, 360
Federal inspections.

55
imports from Cuba.

117
inspection, increase

23
market review.

Each issue.
oils, Belgian...

240
shipments weekly.

Each issue.
See also Under specific names.
Velvet beans, seed crop, situation

412
Virginia-
apples

312
peanuts, prices, etc..

5
potatoes, prices, etc.

71
Warehouses, potato, in Minnesota.

39,72
Washington--
apples, movement, etc.

184, 200, 279-280, 360
pear shipments..

298
potato market.

295-296
raspberries, movement, etc..

40
Yakima Valley, shipments and prices.. 215, 216, 296
Watermelons-
market prices, review..

6, 7,
22, 23, 38, 40, 54, 55, 70, 71, 72, 87, 102, 103, 108,

117, 118, 119, 134, 149-150.
shipments weekly

6, 22,
22, 38, 54, 70, 86, 108, 119, 135, 150, 166, 182, 199,

214, 230.
Wenatchee district, apple shipments..

184
Wheat-
acreage, increase abroad.

192
Agency, Winnipeg, formation.

121
Canada, prices, etc..

61, 64, 336
China acreage and yield.

160, 240
crop, Northern Hemisphere.

192
durum, Marseille market.

32

Page
Wheat-Continued.
exports..

144, 176, 208, 224, 240, 304, 320, 325
feeds, prices

Each issue.
future prices..

Each issue.
imports, by countries.

208, 304
India, surplus, etc..

128, 272
Italy, crop and trade, etc.

16, 32, 266
market review

Each issue.
prices daily.

Each issue.
receipts.

Each issue.
Rumania, situation.

144
Russia, export control.

48
shipments to Portugal

144
stocks on farms.

74
Switzerland, imports.

112
trade, international.

304
world-
crops, 1920–1924

416
exports..

320, 325
Wisconsin-
kraut cabbage decrease..

232
potatoes, situation..

215-216, 328
Wool-
Australasia, exports...

64, 85
Boston quotations.

Each issue.
British trade, relations..

32, 48, 229
imports--
amount and value

324
receipts at Philadelphia, Boston, and New
York.

Each issue.
London sales...

59, 229
market..

19, 384
world supply and consumption..

416

248
6, 7, 22, 39
Each issue.

128
304, 384

76
71
358

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184, 216, 296

Yakima District, apples..
Yugoslavia-
corn crops, 1923, 1924.
sugar production...

352
336

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CERTIFICATE: By direction of the Secretary of Agriculture the matter contained herein is published as statistical information and is required for the proper transaction

of the public business. Free distribution is limited to copies “necessary in the transaction of public business required by law." Subscription price $1 per year (foreign rate $2) payable in cash or money order to the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C.

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JULY 5, 1924

VOL. 2, No. 1

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of the year.

Discrimination against grass cattle and light weight, short fed kinds continued, sellers being unable to make a clearance even at the decline.

Weighty butcher hogs continued to bring a price premium over lights. Sows and grassy light weights arrived in increasing numbers.

Feeding lambs declined in sympathy with fat kinds, but good and choice breeding ewes were in good demand.

Sharp price reductions were enforced on all classes of fresh meats at eastern markets, and to a less extent at Chicago. Despite reduced receipts, supplies accumulated from day to day, demand being practically at a standstill much of the time.

Butter markets were featured by quiet trading and a nervous unsettled feeling. Price declines averaged about 1¢ during the week and the tone at the close still lacked strength. Production was very heavy and an active into storage movement conti ed.

Cheese markets were firm under fairly active trading. Storage situation held the center of attention. Production was heavy and bids were fair to exceed previous records.

Watermelons were a feature of the produce markets during the week June 23–28. Stimulated by warmer weather and the approach of July 4, movement from Florida was very active and the season opened rapidly in Georgia. Total melon shipments were nearly three times as numerous as the week before, and filled 3,500 cars. Daily output was averaging 700 cars. Good demand and rather limited supplies caused the New York City market to advance again after a decline the early part of the week. Chicago followed an opposite trend and prices of large melons dropped to $550 per carload, with small

107733°—241

sizes $400. The Ocala section of Florida reported sales as low as $200, compared with $400 a year ago. Texas f. o. b. market was in good condition.

A peak of 3,300 cars was reached in the week's shipments of cantaloupes from Imperial Valley. About June 23, a range of $1.50-$1.75 per standard crate prevailed at shipping points, but by the close of the week prices had declined to 80€-$1. Eastern city markets were selling these cantaloupes at lower levels than were reported in the Middle West, notwithstanding the higher costs of transportation. Georgia Salmon Tints could be had in Atlanta for only $2 per standard crate.

Rapid closing of the tomato season in Mississippi and Florida left some of the large eastern cities with inadequate supplies. Jobbing prices on Mississippi stock almost doubled in New York. High price of $3.50 was obtained for South Carolina tomatoes in six-basket crates. Midwestern markets did not fluctuate so much, as they are nearer to shipping points in East Texas.

Potato movement increased sharply to more than 5,000 cars for the week, but moderate supplies of the preceding ten days resulted in a stronger price trend nearly everywhere.

Grain market continued in firm position. Corn market reached a new high level during the week but prices were off slightly from recent high point. Wheat and corn prices were well above last year. Weather was unfavorable for growth of new corn crop. Supplies in commercial channels continued to decrease.

Marketing of the 1923 hay crop is about completed. Prospects for the new crop is below last year. Prices were slightly lower as the new crop arrived on the market. There was not much change in market situation during current week.

Feed prices held firm, mainly as a result of strong grain markets. The jobbing and speculative demand was good but the consumptive demand was of little consquence in most sections. Rather heavy stocks of dairy products, excellent pastures, and unsatisfactory milk prices tended to light purchases by feeders and dairymen.

Production and stocks of most feeds were good. Storage stocks of feed were exceptionally heavy for this season of the year.

Prices for spot cotton and new crop future contracts declined during the week June 23–28, but those for July future contracts at New York advanced 41 points. Weakness in the new crop months was attributed largely to more favorable interpretations of crop conditions. A somewhat more active demand for certain lines of goods was reported. The average of the quotations for No. 5 or Middling cotton in 10 designated spot markets declined 19 points, closing at 29.11€ per lb. July future contracts at New York advanced 41 points, closing at 29.036.

1

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Chicago.. Denver East St. Louis Fort Worth.. Indianapolis Kansas City Oklahoma City Omaha. St. Joseph ?. St. Paul Sioux City. Wichita ?

58, 794 16, 834 41, 960 199, 197 36, 967 162, 230 62, 267| 12, 229 50, 038

7, 273 5, 382 2, 214 13, 530 2, 476 10, 659 11, 109 12, 475 1,059 22, 674 10,381 14, 126 79, 36929, 517 46, 8571 11,855 1,171 11, 264 20,893 9, 385 12,383 4, 391 518 3,748 10, 299 6,347 5, 504 8, 970 4, 829

4,066 61, 504 27, 195 32, 918 2, 359 1, 189 1,096 40,215 18, 190 20,974 58, 822 13, 279 45, 195 31, 384, 10, 302 22,668

5, 311 1, 564 3,684 3, 233 457 2, 930 542 29 449 22, 182 7,253 14, 185 88,051 14, 879 72, 820 40,546 8, 547 27, 130

8, 373 3, 246 5, 529 52, 878 13, 381 37, 733 15, 937 4, 252 11, 795 19, 815 3,328 15, 456 63,316 11, 290 51, 184 1, 678 121 1,555 11, 249 4, 589 7, 193 71, 944 23, 592 48, 898 336 14 374 3, 1391 2,098 1, 175, 13, 713 132 13, 221

5, 807 5, 449 305

Total. 228, 888 87,079 142, 945 709, 948 173,683 528, 393 194, 119 62, 125 133, 237 Total June 16

21, 1924. 287, 966 99, 415 180, 0071711, 499 183, 260510, 646 223, 580 54, 274 164, 517 Total June 25

30, 1923. 275, 409 95, 200, 171, 797 723, 925 192, 125 512,725 162, 591 36, 684 122, 996

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Semidemoralization in the fresh-meat trade was the significant burden on livestock prices during the week ending June 28. All species shared the decline, fat steer prices dropping to new low levels for the year, hog values falling temporarily to a parity with last December, while fat sheep and lamb prices melted away to last January dimensions.

On this general price change top butcher hogs fell to $7.15, the average cost dropping to $6.76 at Chicago. The downturn on fat sheep and lambs ran unchecked until the middle of the week under review, when the decline was stopped, at least temporarily, after prices had fallen continuously for nine days. At the low time choice Idaho lambs topped at Chicago at $14, relatively few natives selling above $13.50.

Liberal offerings early in the week suggested an urgent inclination on the part of finishers to load their livestock, a feature brought about to a large extent by the relative scarcity and mounting prices of corn. On Monday, Chicago received 23,783 cattle, the hog run that day at 75,978 being the largest on record for June. All classes of cattle became stagnated, downturns of 50€ or more being registered on beef steers and yearlings. In addition a liberal share of the day's receipts had to be carried over, buyers refusing to buy little else than the better grades.

Discrimination against grass cattle and light-weight, shortfed kinds continued, sellers being unable to get clearance even at the decline. Southwestern grass steers continued to decline at the river markets, prices falling 25-50¢ at Kansas City and St. Louis. A liberal supply of grass steers was a feature in further depressing grassy cows and heifers, outlet for which became very limited.

Although choice 1,300-1b. steers made $10.85 at Chicago, the practical high mark was $10.60. Choice kinds that had had a long turn on corn sold at $9.50 at the low time, yearlings in comparable finish going at $9 and below. There was a liberal supply of weighty long-fed steers at $9.25-$10.25, but yearlings predominated in the run, the bulk selling at $7.50-$8.75. While price reinstatement occurred during a light supply as the week closed, buyers were then competing mainly for numbers, the tone of the dressed market displaying little that suggested vigor. In fact the price relapse was rebuilt merely by curtailment of receipts, the upturn on foot in no way illustrating improvement in dressed product. Hang rails at practically every market center were congested even when foot prices were working higher and with reduced shipping demand impending, owing to the Fourth of July holiday, most members of the trade were urging small country loadings.

Grain-fed cows and heifers above $6-$7, respectively, received some competition but big killers were indifferent toward grassy descriptions selling below these respective prices, day to day accumulations occurring as a result. Bull prices were pounded 25-50e, best heavy bolognas dropping to $4.50 at Chicago while many lightweight grass bulls turning at $3.50-$4. Vealers held steady, packers refusing to follow a temporary advance induced by active buying on the part of small killers.

The supply of sows that had had pigs earlier in the year increased at most market centers, the proportion constituting approximately one-half of the receipts at St. Paul. Grassy lightweights became proportionately more numerous. Weighty butchers continued to bring a price premium over lightweights.

Killers showed so little interest in heavy fat ewes that sellers had, in most instances, to tie these with desirable lambs in order to get a bid. Demand on the part of countrymen for breeding ewes served to maintain the price level on good to choice light kinds. Feeding lambs fell in sympathy with fat kinds, but at the decline finishers displayed considerable interest, although even that branch of the trade was nervous and unstabilized.

Idaho lambs ran more numerously. Killing quality was plainer than recently, a liberal percentage being in feeder flesh; some, however, attracted attention in averaging 84 lbs. Choice Idahos, at $14 at the low time, contrasted with a top of $15.25 a week earlier and $17.25 about two weeks earlier. Natives grading from good to choice were frequent at $13– $13.50, hardly more than two weeks having elapsed since comparable kinds were selling upward at $16.50.

Per Per Per

Per
Per

Pa
100
100
100
100
100

100 Lbs. lbs. Lbs. lbs. \Lbs. lbs. Lbs. Ths. Lbs. lbs. Lbs 18. 244 $6.95 220 $7.00 206 $6.99 220 $6.69 248 $6.55 243 $6.26 245 6.76 210 6.88 1996. 86 214 6. 67 248 6. 48 255 6. 14 243 6.82 222 6. 94 236 6. 95 215 6.71 253 6.48 252 6. 29 244 6.86 210 6.93 214 7.02 220 6.95 249 6.60 254 6. 43 220 6.95 209 7.09 244 7.09 221 7.07 253 6.70 242 6. 46 247 6. 87 209 7. 20 187 7.18 228 7.08 248 6.58 243 6. 53

Monday.
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday.
Average:

June 23-28, 1924..
June 16-21, 1924..
June 25-30, 1923.-

240 6.88 211 6.97 210 6.99 210 6. 79/ 250 6.56 249) 6.30 242 7.15 2111 7. 19 199 7.04 221 6.84 253 6.75 248 6.68 245 6. 95 203 7.23 193 7. 10 221 6.84 260 6.44 243 6.27

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Sharp Reductions Feature Fresh Meat Trade

Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago Sharp price reductions, a continuation of the preceding week's declining market, were enforced on all classes of fresh meats at eastern markets during the week ended June 27. At Chicago, however, while the price trend was generally downward, reductions were relatively slight as compared with those at eastern market centers. Demand was so extremely slow as to be practically at a standstill during the greater part of the period. Despite reduced receipts, supplies accumulated from day to day and with the carryover from the preceding week, were excessive at all times. It was a buyers' market throughout, with many forced sales necessary to move accumulated stocks.

Beef: Steer beef receipts at eastern markets were largely of medium and good grades. Demand for all grades was lacking but the poorer kinds were particularly hard to move. Sales of common steer beef were made as low as $7 at New York although most sales of that grade brought $1-$2 more. A few sales of choice were made up to $17 early in the week, while near the close many carcasses equally as good went at $15. Price declines as compared with the close of the preceding week ranged from $1-$3. Canada contributed 416 quarters of beef to New York's supply. The cow beef market followed closely that of steers, the latter being relatively cheap enough to attract cow beef buyers.

At Chicago the supply of steer beef was confined largely to the medium and good grades. Choice steers, while comparatively scarce, lost 50¢ during the week, while other grades were unchanged. Some beef arrived slightly stale and sold accordingly. Good cow carcasses held steady and attracted the attention of many steer buyers, while other grades declined mostly 50€. Grass cow beef of the canner and cutter grades suffered sharp price reductions. Bulls were scarce at Boston and Philadelphia and the light supply sold slowly at New York, prices dropping around $1.25 per 100-lbs. Trading at Chicago was light at unchanged prices. Kosher beef supplies were liberal and demand poor as a general thing.

Veal: The veal market, after showing indications of steady prices early in the week at eastern centers, soon weakened under a reduced demand, while accumulated supplies forced wholesalers to reduce prices at New York and Philadelphia, declines for the week ranging from $1-$3 on all grades. Demand at Boston was somewhat better than for other classes of fresh meats and prices were unchanged. Normal supplies at Chicago proved somewhat excessive and prices were lowered $1-$2 from a week earlier.

Lamb: The market was again flooded with low-grade lamb; many lots, affected by the high temperatures, arrived out of condition. Price declines for the week at eastern markets ranged from $2-$10, with out-of-condition arrivals selling at extremely wide and uneven prices. At Chicago conditions were similar, it being a case of finding an outlet regardless of price.

Mutton: The moderate receipts of mutton proved too great for the limited demand, and prices dropped $1-$2. Out-ofcondition lots sold for what they would bring, from $3 per 100 pounds up

Pork: Fresh pork loins were a drug on the market in the East, and wholesalers found it necessary to resort to the freezers to prevent ruinous price declines, as demand was at a standstill. At Chicago liberal supplies early in the week were followed by decreased offerings later. Unevenly low spots were reached by stock which had to be sold promptly early in the week.

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Hams:

12-16 lbs. average.- 16.00 Loins:

8-10 lbs. average... 15. 50 10-12 lbs. average.. 13.50 12-14 lbs. average.. 12.00 14-16 lbs, average.. 11. 25

16 lbs. and over... 10. 50 Shoulders: Skinned.

9. 30 Picnics4-6 lbs, average

9.05 6-8 lbs. average

8. 55 Butts:

Boston style. 12. 85 Spare ribs....

6. 50 Lamb and mutton

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28.08 25. 17 15. 88 34. 08 26. 50 14. 79 11.

13. 12 13. 75

12. 96 12. 34

1 Based on average prices to retailers.

. Based on average prices for the following weeks: June 27-July 2, 1921; June 26July 1, 1922; and June 25-30, 1923.

Scoured basis

Grease basis, fleece 1

Fleece

Territory

. 42

.

Fine strictly combing.
Fine French combing.
Fine clothing
1 blood strictly combing -

blood clotbing-
blood strictly combing.
blood clothing..
blood strictly combing

blood clothing -
Low | blood strictly combing -
Common and braid.

. 47-.

Par pound Per pound Per pound $0.50- .51 $1.25-1. 32 $1. 25-1. 32

1. 15-1. 20 1. 15-1. 20 .39–. 40 1. 05-1. 10 1. 05-1, 10

49-50 1. 15-1. 20 1. 15-1. 20 . 43-44 1.00-1. 05 1.00-1.05

48 . 90- .95 . 95-98

42 85.90 88- .93 42-43 75-78

80 40.41 70-75 75-80 .41-.42 78- .80 80-.82 38- . 39 .65- .68 .65- .68

1 Average quotations on the better class of fleece wools similar to Ohio and Pennsylvania. The better class of Michigan, New York, Wisconsin, and Missouri wools 2-5¢ higher, depending on the particular lot offered. The above quotations depend to some extent on the individual lots.

Average Prices of Livestock, Week of June 23-28, 1924, with Comparisons

[In dollars per 100 pounds)

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Cattle
Slaughter cattle and calves:
Steers (1,100 lbs. up)
Choice and prime.-10.45 10.75 10.97 9.80 10.38 10.68 11.00 9. 57

10. 26. 10.44 10.67 9.34 10. 19 10.40 10. 59 9.31
Good..
9. 64 9. 93 10.10 9. 12 9. 62 9.98 10. 20

8.93

9. 40
9. 57

9.90 8. 73 9.31 9.57 9.77 8. 66 9.00 9. 281 9.38 8. 39 Medium

8. 46 8.78 8.95
8. 29 8.18 8. 58 9.04 7. 97 7.00 7.32 8. 15 8. 421 9. 081 8. 03

8. 20 8. 40 8. 69 7. 95 7.88 8.12 8. 25 7.53 Common...

7. 16 7. 38 7. 66 7. 24 6.45 6.85 6.92 6. 58 5. 62 5. 75 6. 56 6.94 7.81 7. 01 6.90 6. 92 7. 44 7.10 6. 50 6. 62 6. 88 6.50 Steers(1,100 lbs.down) Choice and prime. 10.11 10.44 10.80 9. 69 9.98 10.50 10.80 9, 53

9. 97 10.12 10.50 9. 36 9.82 10.10 10.41 9. 28
Good
9. 45 9. 73 9. 84 9.00 9.22 9. 72 9. 96 8.77 7. 75 8. 12 9. 12 9.18 9. 64 8. 62 9.06

9. 32 9.60
8. 61 8.75 9.00 9.38

8. 50 Medium

8. 20
8. 48 8. 65

8. 13 7.72 8. 22 8. 79 7.84 6.62 6.78 7. 86 8. 14 8. 58 7. 75 8.02 8. 22 8. 50 7. 82 7.50 7.72 8.25 7. 58 Common

6. 58 6.82
6. 94 6. 81 5. 68 6.18 6. 58 6.28 5. 25 5.25 6.12 6. 62 7. 15 6. 59 6. 47

6. 68 6. 91 6. 73 5. 75 6.00 6.75 6.35 Canner and cutter. 4. 75 4. 82 4. 38

3. 82
4. 12 4. 40 3. 65 3. 50 3. 50 3.50 4. 32 4. 54 3. 72 3. 51

4. 62
4,78
3. 43 3. 88 4.00

3. 16 Light yearling steers and heifersGood and prime (800 lbs. down). 8.78 9. 14

8. 78
9. 08
7.62 7. 90 8. 63 8.98

8. 60 8. 90

8.00 8. 60 Heifers

Good and choice
(800 lbs. up). 8. 00 8. 20

7.00 7. 221
6. 22 7.53 7. 70
7.55 7.90

7. 60 Common and me

7. 77 6.97

447.85
7. 19

17. 021 6. 45

7. 18
6. 66

17.15 6.42 dium (all weights)

5.98
5.98
5. 15
1 3.88 3. 92 4. 97 5. 09

5, 20 5. 50

15.12 5.35)
Cows-
Good and choice... 6. 42 6. 70

5.90 6. 45
4. 58 4.92 6. 28 6. 45

6. 47 6.90

5. 75 6. 12 Common and me

416.00
5, 59
45. 55 4.98

45.58 5. 101
16.08 5.51

15. 35 5.11 dium..

4. 32
4. 50
4. 22 4. 70
3. 25 3. 42 4. 20 4. 49

4. 27 4.63

3. 751 4. 12) Canner and cutter.. 2. 94 3. 04 2. 85 2. 96 2. 65 2,981 2. 78 2.74 2. 00 2. 04 2. 52 2. 84 3.04 2.83 2. 65 2. 84 3. 05 2.97 2, 50 2. 76 2. 48 2.49 Bulls

Good and choice

(beef yearlings
excluded)
5. 76 5. 98
5. 721 6. 201
3. 88 3. 92 5. 25 5. 32

5.41 5. 76

5. 35 5. 45 Canner to medium

(canner and bo-
logna) 3.
3. 99 4. 25
3.82 4, 20
2.50 2. 58 3. 82 3. 88

4. 08 4. 27

3.72 3.88 Calves

Medium to choice
(190 lbs. down)... 8. 58 8. 62

7.30 8.02
5. 92 6. 40 7.00 7.88

7.98 7.951

6.82 7.50 Medium to choice

459.02 8. 50)
57. 90 7.32

57. 58
7. 30
$8.48 8. 12

6.70

5.98 (190-260 lbs.). 7. 22 7. 20

6. 101 6. 85
5. 42 5. 85 6.00 6. 88

6. 82 6.95

5. 95 6. 02 Medium to choice (260 lbs. up). 5. 80 5. 888 6.40 5. 92

5. 75 6.32 $ 6.65 5. 85 5. 18 5, 48 5. 25 6. 10 6 6. 08 5. 801 5. 88 6. 20 6 6.38 6. 23 4, 75 5. 00 65.00 4.78 Cull and common (190 lbs. down) 6. 18

6. 18
4.75 5. 101
3. 38 3. 72 4. 50 4.88

5. 22 5. 351

4. 75 4. 78
Cull and common
(190 lbs. up) 3. 5. 38 5. 38

3. 55 4. 00
3. 051 3. 201 3. 50 3. 88

4.95 4.88

4, 50 4. 50
Feeder and stocker cattle
and calves:
Steers, common to
cholce (750 lbs. up)? 7. 60 7. 82 7. 59 6.991 5.98 6. 38 7. 12 6. 26 5. 75

5.80
6.88 7. 00 7. 86 7. 08 7.03 7. 11

7.34 6.89 6. 78 6.80 6. 12 5. 71 Steers, common to choice (750 lbs. down) 6.68 6.75 6.64 6. 14 5.85 6. 25 5. 92 5.25 5.12 5. 22 6. 17

6.90
6. 01

6.12 6. 22 6.38 6. 16 5. 78 5. 751 5. 38 5. 12 Steers, inferior (all weights) 4,850 4.881 3. 55 3. 95 3. 12 3. 15 3. 75 3. 75

3. 75 3. 75

3. 50 3. 62 Cows and heifers, common-choice. 4. 38 4. 321 4. 79| 4. 49 4. 02) 4. 12 4. 20 4. 12 3. 38 3. 48 4. 20 4. 35 4.48

4. 38 4. 40 4, 50

4. 58 4. 58 3. 60 4. 001 3. 88 3. 69 Calves, common-choice

4. 25 4. 48

5. 45 5. 75 6. 56 5. 96 5. 35 5. 38 6. 56 6. 48 5. 00 5. 001 Hogs Top (highest price, not average) 7.30 7.55 7.50 11.00 7. 45 7. 50 7.50 10.90 7.50 7.50

7. 25

7. 101 7. 2510.65 7.00 7. 151 7.00 10.40 6.95 7. 10 6.90 10.50 Bulk of sales

6.90 7.14 6. 91 8. 62

7.09 7.25

7. 25
8.95
7.02
7.07 6.90 6.88 6. 85 8. 55 6. 57

6.70

6. 45 8.07 6.40 6.75 6. 10 7.91 Heavyweight (250-350 lbs.) medium-choice.

7. 10 7. 36 6.91 8. 73

7. 181 7. 36

7.07 8.74 6. 99 7.13 6.98 6. 98 6. 90 8. 47 6.75 6.90 6.61 8. 22 6.67 6. 81 6.24 7. 91 Medium weight (200-250 lbs.) medium-choice 7. 02 7. 29

7. 03 8.88 7. 13 7.31 7. 20

8. 90
7.07 7.25 6.95 6.94 6.92 8.61 6. 61

6.74 6.70. 8.40 6.61 6. 81 6.46 8. 16 Light weight (160-200 lbs.) common-choice.

6.70
7. 03 7.00 8. 93 6.91 7. 13 7. 07 8. 87 6. 68 6.79

6. 66 6. 68 6. 68 8.51 6.30 6. 43

6. 58 8. 41 6.54 6.74 6. 68 8. 38 Light lights (130-160 lbs.) common-choice... 6.12 6. 48 6.88 8.75 6. 43 6. 50 6. 83 8. 70 6.43 6. 56 6.04 6. 12 6. 45 8.371 6.00 6. 13

6. 301 6.49 6. 64 Packing sows: Smooth.

6. 52 6. 68 6.09 7. 91 6. 20 6. 30 5.89 7.48 6. 25 6. 23 6. 26 6.35 6.01 7. 39 6. 22 6.31 5. 94 7. 51 5.98 6.15 5. 35 7.11 Rough 6.19 6. 41 5.75 7.51

6.06
6.09 5. 77 7. 19 5. 62 5. 621 6. 12 6. 22 5. 90 7. 08 6.02 6. 10 5. 55 7.05 5.65 5. 87 5. 10

6.79 Slaughter pigs (130 lbs. down) medium-choice 5. 41 5. 77 6. 42 8.30 5. 75 6.13 6. 61 8. 35 5. 73

5. 62
5. 50 5. 51
4. 71 4.77

5.75 6.28 Feeder and stocker pigs (70130 lbs.) common-choice..

5. 50 5. 62 5.79 7.89

5. 09 5. 13 6. 48 8. 151 5.02 5. 06 5.00 7.56 5.66 5. 816. 28 8.31 Sheep and Lambs Slaughter sheep and lambs: Lambs

Light and handy

weight (84 lbs.
down) medium-
prime.
13. 08 14.52 14.34 12. 2012. 15) 13.68 14. 20) 11. 37

12.52 13.88 14.20 11.53 12. 42 13.78 14.17 11.84 12.32 13.52 13.38 11.09 All weights, cull and common. 9.50 10.78 10.55 8. 69 8.48 9.90 10.60 7. 87

8. 72 10.50 10. 22 7.77 9.12 10.58 10.88 8. 66 9.08 10.28 10.00 7. 92 Yearling wethers, medium-prime

10.52 11.98 12.00 9. 66 9.88 11.55 11.75 1010.48 7.90 9.15 9. 10 10.20 10.55 8.54 10.32 11.61 11. 62 9.37 9. 80 11.05 11.00 8. 57 Wethers (2 years old

and over) medium-
prime...

7.85 8.50
6. 38 6.04
6.12 10 6.06 5. 281 5.78

6.32 6. 70 6.70 5. 60 7. 05 7. 62 6.00 5. 75 7. 227.52 5. 25 4.82 Ewes, common-choice 3 4.42 4.72

4.00 4.32

4. 12
4. 32 4, 18 4.75

4. 12 4. 28

3. 98 3.95 Ewes, canner and cull 3 1.95 2. 20

2.00 2. 05
2.00 2. 10 1. 90 2. 25

1.88 1.92

1.88 1.88 Feeding sheep and

lambs: Feeding lambs..----- 11.22 11.58

10.55 11.38 11. 9. 13 Note: Classification of livestock changed July 2, 1923.

6 In old classification classed as heavy weight. 1 Fort Worth began reporting January 15, 1923.

7 Data previous to July, 1923, are averages of feeder steers, 1,000 and 750–1,000 ? Based on average prices for the following weeks: June 27-July 2, 1921; June lbs. in former classification. 26-July 1, 1922; June 25-30, 1923.

In old classification classed as stocker steers, common-choice. : No comparable grade in former classification.

9 Data previous to July, 1923, are averages of stocker calves, good and choice and 4 Old classification combined common to choice; comparable figures are on that common and medium in former classification. description.

10 2-year average. In old classification classed as light and medium weight.

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