Jackson and Klamath Sustained Yield Units Ten-year Timber Management Plan

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Page 29 - take" means to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any such conduct. (15) The term "threatened species" means any species which is likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
Page 19 - Endangered species are those in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of their range.
Page 29 - endangered species' means any species which is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range...
Page 50 - It is applied to primitive areas, some natural areas, and other similar situations where management activities are to be restricted. Class II: Changes in any of the basic elements (form, line, color or texture) caused by a management activity should not be evident in the characteristic landscape.
Page 12 - Runoff is that part of the precipitation, as well as any other flow contributions, which appears in surface streams of either perennial or intermittent form.
Page 18 - In the riffle zone, the velocity of current is great enough to keep the bottom clear of silt and sludge, thus providing a firm bottom for organisms. This zone contains specialized organisms that are adapted to live in running water. For example, organisms adapted to live in fast streams or rapids (trout) have streamlined bodies, which aid in their respiration and in...
Page 2 - Cutting - Removal of individual trees killed or injured by fire, insects, disease, etc., and the removal of those trees likely to die prior to final harvest cut so as to utilize merchantable material.
Page iv - Department of Agriculture— Forest Service Soil Conservation Service Department of Commerce— National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...
Page 50 - Changes in the basic elements, (form, line, color, texture) caused by a management activity may be evident in the characteristic landscape. However, the changes should remain subordinate to the visual strength of the existing character. Class IV. Changes may subordinate the original composition and character but must reflect what could be a natural occurrence within the characteristic landscape. Class V.
Page 42 - To plan and develop a timely, orderly and efficient arrangement of public facilities and services to serve as a framework for urban and rural development.

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