G. Harry Agnew: A Pioneer Missionary

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Free Methodist Publishing House, 1904 - Methodist Church - 317 pages

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Page 252 - Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings leaned to virtue's side ; But in his duty prompt at every call, He watched and wept, he prayed and felt for all ; And, as a bird each fond endearment tries To tempt its new-fledged offspring to the skies, He tried each art, reproved each dull delay, Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way.
Page 207 - FROM Greenland's icy mountains, From India's coral strand, Where Afric's sunny fountains Roll down their golden sand ; From many an ancient river, From many a palmy plain, They call us to deliver Their land from error's chain.
Page 290 - Life ! we've been long together, Through pleasant and through cloudy weather ; 'Tis hard to part when friends are dear — Perhaps 'twill cost a sigh, a tear : — Then steal away, give little warning, Choose thine own time ; Say not ' Good night ' — but in some brighter clime Bid me
Page 97 - For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at. any time they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.
Page 260 - GOD is our refuge and strength, A very present help in trouble. Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, And though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea ; Though the waters thereof roar and be troubled, Though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof.
Page xii - But rise, and stand upon thy feet: for I have appeared unto thee for this purpose, to make thee a minister and a witness both of these things which thou hast seen, and of those things in the which I will appear unto thee...
Page 314 - We live in deeds, not years ; in thoughts, not breaths ; In feelings, not in figures on a dial. We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives Who thinks most — feels the noblest — acts the best...
Page 142 - There let me strive with each besetting sin, Recall my wandering fancies, and restrain The sore disquiet of a restless brain ; And, as the path of duty is made plain, May grace be given that I may walk therein, Not like the hireling, for his selfish gain, With backward glances and reluctant tread, Making a merit of his coward dread, — But, cheerful, in the light around me thrown, Walking as one to pleasant service led ; Doing God's will as if it were my own, Yet trusting not in mine, but in his...
Page 213 - He leadeth me ! He leadeth me ! By His own hand He leadeth me ! His faithful follower I would be, For by His hand He leadeth me. 2 Sometimes 'mid scenes of deepest gloom, Sometimes where Eden's bowers bloom, By waters calm, o'er troubled sea, Still 'tis His hand that leadeth me.
Page 258 - The harvest truly is great, but the laborers are few; pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he would send forth laborers into his harvest.

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