Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic]

Just Ready: with numerous Illustrations, and a Map by

Arrowsmith. 660 pp., 8vo, Cloth, $5 00.

LIVINGSTONE'S ZAMBESI. NARRATIVE OF AN EXPEDITION TO THE ZAMBESI AND ITS TRIB

UTARIES; and of the Discovery of Lakes Shirwa and Nyassa. 1858-1864. By David and CHARLES LIVINGSTONE.

From the Atheneum. While many a reader in happy homes has been perusing, during the last eight years, the narrative of Dr. Livingstone's first expedition, that enterprising traveller, in the interests of trade, science, religion, and humanity, has been engaged in penetrating, through the eastern coast, into unvisited country. He has nobly accomplished a noble work, has “run home," as he calls it, to give to the world the record of his experiences, and has started again, to turn those experiences to profitable purposes for Africa and for the world. There have not been many voices from beyond the waters, not many echoes from afar, that have been more welcome to us than the occasional intelligence which we received of the progress and the fortunes of the African travellers. That intelligence stimulated a curiosity which this book will gratify. It comes from the hands and hearts of those who write so naturally and wisely, that the apology for supposed lack of literary ability seems almost an affectation on the part of the principal author, who, to acuteness of observation, added nice discernment and accurate judgment; who never lost hope, courage, or perseverance; who, having a work to do, was determined to go through with it; whó puts his trust in God, has some reliance on his weapons, some well-founded confidence in his common-sense, and who learned to care no more for African fevers than Lady Sale did for earthquakes.

Dr. Livingstone has found, according to this interesting volume, a wide and new field for commerce, emigration, and civilization.

From the Reader. Combine Moffat with Mungo Park, and the result would resemble David Livingstone. This remarkable man has spent almost the whole of his life in unknown Africa. He resided among the Kaffirs for many years, laboring to convert them to the Christian faith. He made no less than five great journeys, each of sufficient importance to have gained him a reputation.

The first book which he produced was immense. Criticism recoiled awe-struck before it. It. contained the adventures, the experiences, the impressions of sixteen years in Africa. It was the record of a missionary's life on the frontier of white men's settlements; described the customs of savage tribes previously unknown to us even by name; and added greatly to our geographical knowledge of Central Africa. He discovered lakes like seas, chains of mountains, and a waterfall which is larger than Niagara. Such a book as this could be compared with no other book ; nothing like it had ever been written before ; it was an encyclopedia compiled not from a library, but from a continent. * * * *

The expedition, then, has enriched us with valuable collections, obtained during six years, and from regions unexplored before. It has discovered a port which can be made available for com

It has ascertained the exact value of the Zambesi as a water-road. It has brought us also valuable information respecting the natural productions of the soils in Eastern Africa. Indigo has been found growing wild over large tracts of country, and often attains the height of a

The cotton is found to be of a very superior quality. Cotton wool sent to Manchester was pronounced to be twopence per pound better in quality than common New Orleans. The plant also appears to be peculiarly vigorous and persistent in the soil. The soils are also favorable to the delicate tobacco plant, to the custor-oil plant, and to the sugar-cane.

“ The Zambesi and its Tributaries” is a work which every one should read, and which all who have libraries should buy.

From the Examiner. As a traveller Dr. Livingstone is unsurpassed, and after another six years' spell of work that would have killed six ordinary men, the results of his journeyings are here pithily detailed in a volume quite as valuable and interesting as the “Missionary Travels" of 1857. * * *

Dr. Livingstone is by far the most painstaking and precise of our African travellers. He looks and looks again at every thing that comes in his way, and he spares no trouble in turning aside to complete his knowledge, and fit himself to give a terse, vigorous, and truthful description of whatever is worth noticing at all. He has good eyes, and writes a skillful record, whatever the bias of his judgment.

merce.

man,

PUBLISHED BY HARPER & BROTHERS, Franklin SQUARE, New York.

NET Sent by Mail to any part of the United States, postage free, on receipt of $5 00.

[ocr errors][merged small]

“Upon the midlands now the industrious muse doth fall,

The shires which we the heart of England well may call.

My native country thou, which so brave spirits hast bred,
If there be virtues yet remaining in thy earth,
Or any good of thine thou bred'st into my birth,
Accept it as thine own, whilst now I sing of thee,
Of all thy later brood the unworthiest though I be."

DRAYTON: Polyolbion.

FELIX HOLT,

THE RADICA L.

BY GEORGE ELIOT, Aweudon,

AUTHOR OF “ADAM BEDE,” « THE MILL ON THE FLOSS," " SILAS MARNER,”

“SCENES OF CLERICAL LIFE,” “ROMOLA," &c.

· NEW YORK:

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

FRANKLIN SQUARE.

1866.

« PreviousContinue »