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father of the faithful, he would sensual delights, here he was a “ command his children, and his Boanerges, a son of thunder. household after him, that they | It was another property of his should keep the way of the preaching, that there was everLord.”

more much of Christ in it: And As a preacher he made it his with Paul he could say, “I de. care to give to everyone his termined to know nothing but meat in due season. The food Jesus Christ;" having that bles. which he administered was sal- | sed name in his discourses, with utary and nourishing. His ser- a frequency like that with which mons did not consist of vain and Paul mentions it in his efistles. empty speculations, but of the The Lord Jesus Christ was the solid and important truths of the loadstone, which gave a touch gospel. In his discourses he to all the sermons of this Chrisstudiously renounced such doc- tian minister-a glorious, pretrines as detract from the grace cious, amiable Christ was the of God in the salvation of man, point of heaven, towards which or tend to undermine, or lead they still verged. From hence men to set aside and reject any 1 it was, that he would give that of the peculiar doctrines of the advice to young preachers ; Christian scheme ; and stated-“ Pray, let there be much of Jy preached the contrary sentiChrist in your Ministry.” And ments.

when he had heard a sermon, His way of preaching was which had any special relish of very plain, so as to be intelligi- a blessed Jesus in it, he would ble to children; at the same say upon the occasion," Oh, blestime, being fraught with many sed be God, that we have Christ important sentiments, it was so much, and so well preached grateful to the more knowing in poor New England.” among his hearers. His way | Moreover, he was pleased of preaching was very power with no preaching, where it ful. His delivery was always evidently appeared, that there very graceful and agreeable-- had been a gross defect in studybut when he was to use reproofsing the discourse. And he and warnings against any sin, would very much commend a bis voice would rise into a sermon which he could perceive Warmth, which had in it very had required some good propor. much of energy, as well as de. tion of thinking and reading in cency. He would sound the trum- the author of it. He once thus pet of God against all vice with expressed himself to a preacher, a most penetrating liveliness. then just come home from the And it was observed, that there assembly with him ; " Brother, was usually a special fervor in there was oil required for the the rebukes which he bestowed service of the sanctuary ; but upon a carnal frame of life in it must be beaten oil ; I praise professors of religion : And God, that I saw your oil so well when he was to brand the earth | beaten to-day; the Lord help us ly mindedness of church mem- | always, by good study, to beat bers, and the allowance and in- our oil, that there may be na dulgence, which some of them knots in our sermons left undistoo often gave themselves in / solved, and that there may a

clear light be thereby given in | didly speaks of the author as a the house of God.”

I godly, though erring brother. And yet he ļikewise looked He strenuously pleaded the for something in a sermon because of those, who could not side and beyond the mere study speak for themselves. While of man ; he was for having the he opposed errors in religion, Spirit of God breathing in it, and contended earnestly for and with it ; and he was for those doctrines and rites, which speaking those things, from he esteemed to be founded on those impressions, and with those the gospel ; yet no man could affections, which might compel | entertain persons of a different the hearer to say, “ The Spirit persuasions from himself with of God was here."

more candor and kindness than · Mr. Eliot had a deep sense of he, when he saw, to his satisfacthe solemn charge given him by tion, the fear of God prevalent the inspired apostle, in the name in their hearts and lives. He of his divine inaster, “ To take could uphold intimate corresheed to all the flock over which pondence with such men, who, the Holy Ghost had made him though differing from him in an overseer-to feed Christ's some points not essential to sallambs as well as his sheep." He vation, yet held the head, and always had a mighty concern were confirmed to the divine upon his mind for little children ; | Saviour in their temper and conand took unwearied pains that duct.-But having once baptiChrist might be formed in them. I zed the children of professors,

One thing of which he was he did not, as too many have very desirous for poor children done, think that he had now done was that they might be brought with them: No ; another thing, under the bond of the covenant. in which he was very laborious He very openly and earnestly was the catechising of them. maintained the cause of infant He kept up the great ordinance baptism against a certain denom- of catechising both publicly and ination risen since the reforma- privately, and spent in it a great tion, who deny and strenuously deal of time. He thought himoppose it. He carefully.suidied self under a particular obligation the controversy, and found satis- to be an instructor of the young, factory arguments in the sacred | Nor was he ashamed any more writings, that the infants of be-than some of the worthiest men Jievers are fit subjects to have among the ancients were, to be upon them a mark of dedication called a catechist. He would to the Lord.

observe upon John xxi. 15. That In his time a book was bro't the care of the Lambs is one among the people written by third part of the charge over one who was esteemed a pious the church of God. And givman ; but it was in oppositioning the right hand of fellowship to infant-baptism ; by it some to a young minister at his ordibecame disposed to, or confirm- | nation, he addressed him in a ed in a prejudice against Pædo- hearty, fervent and zealous man. baptism ; and it was not long ner, in these amongst other before Mr. Eliot published an weighty sentences : « Brother, answer to it; in which he can- l art thou a lover of the Lord father of the faithful, he would sensual delights, here he was a “ command his children, and his Boanerges, a son of thunder. household after him, that they! It was another property of his should keep the way of the preaching, that there was ever. Lord.”

more much of Christ in it: And As a preacher he made it his with Paul he could say, “I decare to give to everyone his termined to know nothing but meat in due season. The food Jesus Christ;" having that bles. which he administered was sal. sed name in his discourses, with utary and nourishing. His ser- a frequency like that with which mons did not consist of vain and Paul mentions it in his ejuistles. empty speculations, but of the The Lord Jesus Christ was the solid and important truths of the loadstone, which gave a touch Gospel. In his discourses he to all the sermons of this Chrisstudiously renounced such doc-tian minister-a glorious, pretrines as detract from the grace cious, amiable Christ was the of God in the salvation of man, point of heaven, towards which or tend to undermine, or lead they still verged. From hence men to set aside and reject any it was, that he would give that of the peculiar doctrines of the advice to young preachers ; Christian scheme ; and stated-“ Pray, let there be much of ly preached the contrary senti-Christ in your Ministry.” And ments.

when he had heard a sermon, His way of prcaching was which had any special relish of very plain, so as to be intelligi- a blessed Jesu's in it, he would ble to children ; at the same say upon the occasion," Oh, bles. time, beirig fraught with many sed be God, that we have Christ important sentiments, it was so much, and so well preached grateful to the more knowing in poor New England.” among bis hearers. His way. Moreover, he was pleased of preaching was very power- with no preaching, where it ful. His delivery was always evidently appeared, that there very graceful and agreeable-- had been a gross defect in study: but when he was to use reproofs / ing the discourse. And he and warnings against any sin, / would very much commend a his voice would rise into a sermon which he could perceive Warmth, which had in it very bad required some good propor: much of energy, as well as de- / tion of thinking and reading in cercy. He would sound the trum- the author of it. He once thus pet of God against all vice with expressed himself to a preacher, a most penetrating liveliness. I then just come home from the And it was observed, that there assembly with him ; “ Brother, was usually a special fervor in there was oil required for the the rebukes which he bestowed service of the sanctuary ; ou upon a carnal frame of life in it imust be beaten oil ; I praise professors of religion : And God, that I saw your oil so well when he was to brand the earth- / beaten to-day ; the Lord help us ly mindedness of church mem- always, by good study, to beat bers, and the allowance and in- our oil, that there may be... dulgence, which some of them knots in our sermons lelt unais, too often gave themselves in solved, and that there may a

clear light be thereby given in | didly speaks of the author as a the house of God."

godly, though erring brother. And yet he likewise looked He strenuously pleaded the for something in a sermon because of those, who could not side and beyond the mere study speak for themselves. While of man ; he was for having the he opposed errors in religion, Spirit of God breathing in it, and contended earnestly for and with it ; and he was for those doctrines and rites, which speaking those things, from he esteemed to be founded on those impressions, and with those | the gospel ; yet no man could affections, which might compel | entertain persons of a different the hearer to say, “ The Spirit persuasions from himself with of God was here."

more candor and kindness than Mr. Eliot had a deep sense of he, when he saw, to his satisfacthe solemn charge given him by tion, the fear of God prevalent the inspired apostle, in the name in their hearts and lives. He of his divine inaster, “ To take could uphold intimate corresbeed to all the flock over which pondence with such men, who, the Holy Ghost had made him though differing from him in an overseer-to feed Christ's some points not essential to sallambs as well as his sheep." He vation, yet held the head, and always had a mighty concern were confirmed to the divine upon his mind for little children ; | Saviour in their temper and conand took unwearied pains that duct.-But having once baptiChrist might be formed in them. zed the children of professors,

One thing of which he was he did not, as too many have very desirous for poor children done, think that he had now done was that they might be brought with them: No ; another thing, under the bond of the covenant. in which he was very laborious He very openly and earnestly was the catechising of them. maintained the cause of infant | He kept up the great ordinance baptism against a certain denom- of catechising both publicly and ination risen since the reforma- privately, and spent in it a great tion, who deny and strenuously deal of time. He thought himoppose it. He carefully suidied self under a particular obligation the controversy, and found satis- to be an instructor of the young. factory arguments in the sacred Nor was he ashamed any more writings, that the infants of be-/ than some of the worthiest men Jievers are fit subjects to have among the ancients were, to be upon them a mark of dedication called a catechist. He would to the Lord.

observe upon John xxi. 15. That In his time a book was bro't the care of the Lambs is one among the people written by third part of the charge over one who was esteemed a pious the church of God. And giv. man ; but it was in oppositioning the right hand of fellowship to infant -baptism ; by it some to a young minister at his ordibecame disposed to, or confirm- nation, he addressed Bim in a ed in a prejudice against Pædo- | hearty, fervent and zealous manbaptism ; and it was not long ner, in these amongst other before Mír. Eliot published an weighty sentences : 5 Brother, answer to it; in which he can- 1 art thou a lover of the Lord

Jesus Christ? Then, I pray, among us! That our schools feed his Lambs.” It would be may flourish! That every memalmost incredible should it be ber of this assembly may go related, what pains he took to home, and procure a good school instil the truths of the gospel to be encouraged in the town into the minds of the young where he lives: That before people of his congregation ; , we die we may be so happy as to and what prudence he used in see a good school encouraged in suiting his catechisms to the every plantation of the country." age, and different abilities of the God so blessed his endeavors children and youth of hischarge. that Roxbury could not live qui. This must be observed, that etly without a free school in the though there was a very great town:* And the issue of it has number of catechisms extant, yet Mr. Eliot took upon him- | * It were to be wished, that all in

public stations in the church and all self the labor of adding to their

other men, especially those of special number, by composing some infixe

influence in civil and ecclesiastical stafurther catechisms, which were stions through the states, would unite more particularly designed as an in using their earnest endeavors that antidote for his own people good schools may be set up, and sup. against the contagion of such | ported every where. I need not say errors, as might threaten any

of what importance this is to the peo.

| ple in a moral and political view. In peculiar danger to them. And

this age and country there is no exthe effect and success of this cat-cuse for neglects of this kind. The echising bore proportion to the legislators in the state of Connecticut indefatigable industry with which have discovered a patriotic spirit by he pursued it. It is a well making such large provision for a principled people, that he has

1 permanent fund for the support of

schools : an example worthy of imi. left behind him. They are / tation. It is common for too many well instructed in the truths of people in one place and another, Christianity, and able to defend where no special provision is made them against the subtle attacks | by private persons, or public bodies, of seducers.

for the support of schools, to grudge There was a third instance of

the expense, which will be incurred

by keeping up those that are good, his regard to the welfare of the which generally are, and always children under his charge, and ought to be attended with larger pe. that was his perpetual resolution | cuniary expense than those that are and activity to support a good

poor, or indifferent : But this is an school in the town where he resi

ill-judged and unhappy parsimony.

The following anecdote is worthy of ded. He would always have a

notice: Aristippus, a Cyrenian phi. grammar schoolin the place,what-losopher, (said to have been cotemeverit cost him; and he importu- porary with Socrates) having coun. ned all other places to have the

selled a father to see for a good tutor like. In a synod of the churches,

for his son, he was asked, what would which met at Boston, to consider

| that amount to ? He answered, an

hundred crowns; the covetous fa. how the miscarriages among the ther replied, that such a sum might people might be prevented, he buy him a slave : Well, said Aristipbeing called to lead in prayer, pus, bestow your money so, and you did with great fervor utter ex

shall have two slaves ; the one your pressions to this purport ;

ill-bred son, and the other he whom “ Lord, for schools every where!

you buy for your money."

Bp. Burnet on Education, p.25.

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