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spiritual wound, to the great | Q. Do you think that in the hazard of his soul.

terms used by Christ, in the latBut as men's falling on a ter part of the text we have been stone, does not always prove the considering, there was an allumeans of their death-as they sion to any ancient prediction ? sometimes recover from the R. Perhaps there was. For wounds thereby received ; so, the words naturally bring to men's being so offended in mind the vision, recorded by DaChrist, as to disown and reject niel, of a stone cut out without him for a time, does not in all hands, which smote the image, cases issue in their utter and ev- which Nebuchadnezzar saw, uperlasting ruin : there is a possi- on his feet, and brake them to bility of their being, recovered pieces : whereupon, the iron, from the dangerous wounds, the clay, the brass, the silver, which they thereby give to their and the gold, were broken to souls ; and some, who have pieces together, and became thus fallen, have afterwards been like the chaff of the summer converted and healed. Witness threshing floors ; and the wind the case of Paul, and of num- carried them away. bers of the Jews, who, for a Q. What an affecting view, do time, were offended in Christ, the solemn truths stated in this but afterwards believech and conference, exhibit, of the dan. found salvation in him.

gerous and alarming condition . But on whomsoever this stone of all those, who have hitherto shall fall, it will grind him to been so stumbled or offended in powder. That is, as a huge Christ, on any account whateve stone, falling upon a man, crush- er, as not cordially to own and es him to atoms, and instantly recieve him, and build upon puts an end to his life, beyond hiin, as the alone foundation of the possibility of escape or all well grounded hopes of salrestoration ; so he on whomso-vation ! ever Christ falls, by his almighty R. Dangerous and threatening power, to take vengeanceon him, indeed, is the condition of all for his persevering and final re- such ; and infinitely doth it conjection of him, will be complete-cern them, to give up every obly ruined for ever: his destruc-jection against Christ and the tion will be remediless, terrible, gospel, and to receive him, and

total, and final. This stone will become cordially obedient to thus fall on all those who are him, without delay. finally disobedient to the gospel. I 2 Thess. i. 7, 8, 9.

The Catholic Docirine of a Trinity, &C.

. (Continued from p. 339.). + 1 Cor. viii. 6, To us there is but ONË GOD, THE

FATHER.

If we compare this with that expression of St. Thomas,--John XX. 28, MY LORD, and MY GOD, we have the following argument :

Tous there is but one God, the FATHER.

But to US JESUS CHRIST IS GOD : therefore, The Gospel has either preached two Gods to us, one distinct from the other : or that one God the Father is here the name of a nature, under which Christ himself, as God, is also comprehended. And the same may be proved of it in several other places.

XXXIV. † Matt. xxiii. 9. Call no man your Father upon

earth, for one is YOUR FATHER which is in heaven. Ibid. v, 10. Neither be ye called masters, for one is

YOUR MASTER, even CHRIST. John iii. 13. which is in heaven.

Dr. Clarke has a particular Section", wherein he pretends to have set down the Passages that ascribe the highest Titles, Perfections, and Powers, to the second Person of the Trinity. Yet he has wholly omitted the latter of these verses ; though by a rule of his own inaking, it allows to Christ an higher title than any other in the whole Scripture. It is this same Author, who has laid so great a stress upon the word 815, one, which he has insisted upon it can signify nothing else, but one Person ; and the criticism is thought to be of such use and importance to his Scheme, that his book begins with it ; and in the course of his work it is repeated three times, nearly in the same words. But the Passage now before us, if he had produced it, would have turned his own weapon against himself. For the word ekt, is here an attribute of Christ ; and if we argue from it in this place, as he has done in the other, it must prove, that one person only is our Master, and that this person is Christ : which excludes the Persons of the Father and the Spirit from the honor of that title ; and so reduces that learned author's reasoning to a manifest absurdity. . We are to conclude then, that as the Phrase, one Master, cannot be meant to exclude the Father ; so neither does that other one is good (supposing that were the sense of the Greek) or, one is your Father, exclude the person of Christ. And if the reason of the thing teaches us that it cannot, so the Scripture assures us in fact that it does not : the title of Father, being also ascribed to the second person of the Trinity. For Christ, the Alpha and Omega, says of himself - He that overcometh shall inherit ail things, and I will be HIS GOD, and he shall be MY SONT. Isaiah calls him - The Everlasting FATHERf. And again it is written They are the CHILDREN of GOD, being the children of the RESURRECTION|| : But, says Christ - I am the RESURRECTIONS: therefore he is God, and hath us for his Children. If this be the case, the word Father cannot always be a name that distinguishes God from another person of God : but is often to be under: wood as a term of relation between God and Man: or as a modern Divine of our Church has well expressed it A word not intended for God the lather only, the First • Chap. ii. §. 3. + Rev. xxi. 7. ix. 6. | Luke xx. 36. § John xi. 25, VOL, VI. NO. 10.

Z z

person of the Trinity ; but as it is referred unto the Creature, *6 made and conserved by God; in which sense it appertains to o the whole Trinity."

XXXV. + Fohn xiv. 28. MY FATHER IS GREATER than I.

The two preceding Articles will sufficiently justify what the Church has asserted with a view to this passage That Christ is « inferior to the Father as touching his Manhood.” And the stream of the whole Scripture is against that use the Ariana generally make of it; who stand in need to be reminded at every turn, that in the person of Christ, there is a human soul and body, the nature of a man, which as it cannot lay claim to what is spoken of Christ in unity with the Father, so must it receive to its own account whatever seems to degrade.and disjoin him from the Father. It is indeed hard to say, which of the two heresies is the most unreasonable and unscriptural; that of the Socinians, which never considers Christ as any thing but a mere man ; or that of the Arians, who never look upon him as any thing but a supposititious God. Between these two gross errors, lies the true Catholic Faith ; which as it allows him to be perfect God and perfect man, is never offended, or put to its shifts, by any thing the Scripture may have said about him in either capacity.

XXXVI. f 1 Cor. xi. 3. The Head of Christ is God.

The name Christ does here stand, as in other places out of number, for the man Christ; otherwise it must follow, that as Christ is God, God is the head of himself; which is a contradiction ; or that one God is the head of another God; which also is a contradiction.

This Text is capable of a good illustration from Gen. iii. 15. where we read, that the heel of the promised seed should be bruiscd: by which, the Church has always understood the sufferings of his human nature, metaphorically represented by the inferior part in man. So in this place, his Divinity or superior nature s as aptly signified by the head or superior part of the human body.

XXXVII. * Mark. xiii. 32. But of that day and hour know

eth no man, no not the Angels which are in heaven, neither THE SON but the FATHER.

It is declared of Christ in another place, that he increased in urd" som* : why should it be incredible then, that during the whole term of his humiliation in the flesh, something should still do lefi, which as man upon earth he did not know ? if you suppose him to be ignorant of this matter as God, how is it that St. confesses him to be omniscient, without receiving any rebuke

it, or being reminded of any particular exception ? LON · thou knowest ALL THINGS+.

* Luke ii. 52. † John xxi. 17.

XXXVIII. t John i. 18. No man hath SEEN GOD at any time. Ibid, xiv. 8, 9. Pbilip saith unto him, Lord Shaw

US THĘ FATHER-hast thou not SEÉN ME Philip? he chat hath seen me hath seen THE FATHER.

6 These words (says Dr. Clarke) do not signify, that he who 6 hath seen the Person of Christ hath seen the person of the Fa6. ther." No surely ; but that he who hath seen all that was visible of Christ, hath seen the person, to whom was joined that invisible and divine Nature, which the Scripture has called by the Name of the Father And to shew that Christ (though he was God manifest in the flesh*) is yet no other than the same invisible, God, whom no man hath or can see and live, we are toid, that « when he shall appear. (glorified, not with any secondary divinity, • “ but with the FATHER'S OWNSELF +) we shall be like him « (fashioned like unto his own glorious bodyf, and conformed to his " Imagell) for we shall SEE him AS HE IS ;" which no man er6 er yet hath donie.

XXXIX. + I Cor. xv. 27. But when he saith all things are put

under him, it is manifest that he' IS EXCEPTED (EXTOS 78 utoTAŽAvtos) which did put all things under him, And when all things shall be SUBDUED (voteryn).

UNTO HIM. Pbil. m. 20, 21. We look for the SAVIOUR, the

Lord JESUS CHRIST-Who-is ABLE even to SUB-, · DUE ALL THINGS ( upora! Ta Watu) to HIMSELF.

It is manifest, therefore, that the exception in the former text, is not meant to set one person of God above another person of God ; but only to distinguish the Power of the Divine Nature from that of the human in its greatest exaltation. As Christ is man, all things are subdued unto him by ANOTHER ; as Christ is God, he himself is that other, and able to subdue all things to HIMSELF. And this will be sufficient to confirm the Reader in what I have already observed that the cause of Arianism borrows its chief support from the humiliation of Christ in the flesh. Search the very best of their arguments to the bottom, by, a diligent comparing of the Scripture with itself, and they all amount to this great absurdity- Man is inferior to God ; therefore God is, inferior to himself : and this they prove, by imputing to Christ's Divinity what is said only of his humanity.

I have now presented to the Reader's consideration the most noted texts, which, under the management of Arian or Socinian Expositors, may seem to have favored their Doctrine. Many, I hope, will be of opinion, that the Catholic cause is rather beholden to them, particularly in this last instance, for the opposition

* 1 Tim. iii. 16. † John xyii. 5. Phil iii. 21. || Rom. viii. 22.

person of the Trinity ; but as it is referred unto the Creature, " made and conserved by God; in which sense it appertains to “ the whole Trinity."

. XXXV. of Fobn xiv. 28. MY FATHER is GREATER than I.

The two preceding Articles will sufficiently justify what the Church has asserted with a view to this passage That Christ is " inferior to the Father as touching his Manhood.” And the stream of the whole Scripture is against that use the Arians generally make of it; who stand in need to be reminded at every turn, that in the person of Christ, there is a human soul and body, the nature of a man, which as it cannot lay claim to what is spoken of Christ in unity with the Father, so must it receive to its own account whatever seems to dégrade and disjoin him from the Father. It is indeed hard to say, which of the two heresies is the most unreasonable and unscriptural ; that of the Socinians, which never considers Christ as any thing but a mere man; or that of the Arians, who never look upon him as any thing but a supposititious God. Between these two gross errors, lies the true Catholic Faith ; which as it allows him to be perfect God and perfect man, is never offended, or put to its shifts, by any thing the Scripture may have said about him in either capacity.

XXXVI. + 1 Cor. xi. 3. The Head of Christ is God.

The name Christ does here stand, as in other places out of number, for the man Christ; otherwise it must follow, that as Christ is God, God is the head of himself ; which is a contradiction; or that one God is the head of another God; which also is a contradiction.

This Text is capable of a good illustration from Gen. iii. 15. where we read, that the heel of the promised seed should be bruis. ed: by which, the Church has always understood the sufferings of his human nature, metaphorically represented by the inferior part in man. So in this place, his Divinity or superior nature is as aptly signified by the head or superior part of the human body.

XXXVII. ţ 'Mark, xiii. 32. But of that day and hour know.

eth no man, no not the Angels which are in heaven, neither THE SON but the FATHER.'

It is declared of Christ in another place, that he increased in wissom* : why should it be incredible then, that during the whole term of his humiliation in the flesh, something should still be lefi, which as man upon earth he did not know ? if you suppose him to be ignorant of this matter as God, how is it that St. Peter confesses him to be omniscient, without receiving any rebuke for

it, or being reminded of any particular exception ? LORD, · thou knowest ALL THINGS+.

* Luke ii. 52. † John xxi. 17.

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