Agriculture of New-York: Comprising an Account of the Classification, Composition and Distribution of the Soils and Rocks ... Together with a Condensed View of the Climate and the Agricultural Productions of the State, Part 5, Volume 2

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Page 137 - It is considered by Mr. Harmon as new; having been produced by himself, by a selection of the best seed, and liming and sowing it upon a limestone soil. It is larger than the White Flint; and yet the cuticle of the kernel is equally thin, delicate and white. It weighs, according to the statement of Mr. Harmon, when prepared for seed, 64 Ibs.
Page 138 - ... has been brought out by the skill of Mr. Harmon, from the Virginia White May kind. Its chaff is red; head bald and of a medium length. It is said to weigh 66 Ibs. to the bushel. Its specific gravity is 1-321. The objection to this kind is its red berry : its recommendation is that it does not rust. TUSCAN BALD WHEAT. — This kind, which was introduced^ from Tuscany in 1837, has been laid aside in consequence of its liability to be injured or destroyed by frost. Its flour is fine and white, and...
Page 149 - Silica, Phosphoric acid, Sulphuric acid, Carbonic acid, Lime, Magnesia, Peroxide of iron, Potash, Soda...
Page 141 - ANALYSIS OF WHEAT, INCLUDING STRAWS AND CHAFF. BY PROFESSOR EMMONS. Many difficulties exist in the analysis of the grain of the cereals, and particularly in wheat and Indian corn. In consequence of this fact in part, I regret that I am unable to give a full account of the composition of the former. But this is not all. I have been poorly supplied with samples of the grain ; and not living in a wheat district, I have been unable to procure it, either in a ripe condition, or in its different stages...
Page 332 - There are, then, two seasons for cutting wood : if it is expected to last, it must be cut the last of summer, or during the early part of autumn ; if it is wished to clothe the surface with a new growth of trees, the cutting must be made late in winter. It is, however, possible to modify these arrangements : if, for example, the •wood is designed for timber, if it is deprived of its bark in the spring...
Page 322 - BEECH. — (Fagm ferruginea.) Tree a little hollow at the base. Diameter three feet from the ground, 28 inches ; fourteen feet from the ground, 22 inches — sound. Average thickness of the bark, J inch. Section for analysis taken fourteen feet from the ground. Age, 240 years. Growth, quite uniform. Average thickness of each layer, 0.0453 of an inch. Between 60 and 65 outside layers taken for outside wood ; the remaining layers for inside wood. BASS WOOD. — ( Tilia Americana.') Tree sound.
Page 317 - Potash, .... Soda, ..... Chloride of sodium, . Sulphate of lime, .... Phosphate of peroxide of iron, Phosphate of lime, Phosphate of magnesia, Carbonic acid, .... Lime, ..... Magnesia, ..... Silica, Soluble silica, .... Organic matter, . COMMON WILD GRAPE-VINE.
Page 149 - A comparison can be made by any person who feels an interest in the matter. I do not, therefore, propose to enter upon a detail of difference or similarity ; observing, however, that in the statement respecting the phosphates and phosphoric acid, I have given the phosphates of the earths and phosphates of the alkalies, by which it will be perceived that the earths, the lime and magnesia, as well as iron, are in combination with phosphoric acid. This fact does not appear in the extract which is given....
Page 313 - . 60.90 66.65 41.00 Ash 0.35 0.16 '. 4.55 SUGAR MAPLE. — (Acer saccharinum.} Tree sound. • Diameter three feet from the ground, 28 inches ; do. 12 feet from the ground, 21J inches. From the base to the limbs, 62 feet. Whole length of the tree, 107 feet. Average thickness of the bark, inch.
Page 11 - ... grow in this district, consists of sandstone ; and although the trees find in it a quantity of alkaline earths sufficient for their own sustenance, yet in its ordinary condition it is incapable of producing grain. The most decisive proof of the use of strong manure was obtained at Bingen (a town on the Rhine), where the produce and development of vines were highly increased by manuring them with such...

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