The Poetical Works of Edmund Waller and Sir John Denham: With Memoir and Critical Dissertation

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Page 206 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Page 159 - Go, lovely Rose ! Tell her, that wastes her time and me, That now she knows, When I resemble her to thee, How sweet and fair she seems to be. Tell her that's young And shuns to have her graces spied, That hadst thou sprung In deserts, where no men abide, Thou must have uncommended died. Small is the worth Of beauty from the light retired: Bid her come forth, Suffer herself to be desired, And not blush so to be admired.
Page 216 - What barbarous invader sack'd the land ! But when he hears no Goth, no Turk, did bring This desolation, but a Christian king ; When nothing but the name of zeal appears 'Twixt our best actions and the worst of theirs ; What does he think our sacrilege would spare, When such th...
Page 216 - Thames ! the most lov'd of all the Ocean's sons By his old sire, to his embraces runs, Hasting to pay his tribute to the sea, Like mortal life to meet eternity...
Page 209 - Horace his wit and Virgil's state He did not steal, but emulate! And when he would like them appear, Their garb, but not their clothes, did wear.
Page 43 - ON A GIRDLE THAT which her slender waist confined Shall now my joyful temples bind : No monarch but would give his crown His arms might do what this has done. It was my Heaven's extremest sphere, The pale which held that lovely deer : My joy, my grief, my hope, my love Did all within this circle move. A narrow compass ! and yet there Dwelt all that's good, and all that's fair : Give me but what this ribband bound, Take all the rest the Sun goes round.
Page 196 - Lets in new light through chinks that Time has made: Stronger by weakness, wiser, men become As they draw near to their eternal home. Leaving the old, both worlds at once they view That stand upon the threshold of the new.
Page 217 - Brings home to us, and makes both Indies ours : Finds wealth where 'tis, bestows it where it wants, Cities in deserts, woods in cities plants ; So that to us no thing, no place is strange, While his fair bosom is the world's exchange.
Page 215 - DO bound, but must advance So far, to make us wish for ignorance, And rather in the dark to grope our way Than, led by a false guide, to err by day...
Page 20 - While in the park I sing, the listening deer Attend my passion, and forget to fear : When to the beeches I report my flame, They bow their heads, as if they felt the same : To gods appealing, when I reach their bowersr With loud complaints they answer me in showers.

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