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Board. 1930–43, Yellow Truck Lines, Inc., president and general manager. 1928 to present, attorney for Stephen, Sketteland & Sutherlong.

Fred Climer. Education: Miami University. Experience: 1943 to present, hearings officer and employer board member, National War Labor Board. Mr. Climer is supervisor of industrial relations and personnel policies for Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.

S. Bayard Colgate. Experience: 1943 to present, employer board member, National War Labor Board. Mr. Colgate is chairman of the board, ColgatePalmolive-Peet Co., Jersey City, N.J.

Hoey A. Hennessy. Education: Brown University and St. Lawrence University. Experience: 1943 to present, panel member and employer board member, National War Labor Board. 1919 to present, Carteret Industrial Association, general manager. : Charles R. Hook, Jr. Education: Yale University. Experience: 1942 to present, mediation representative and employer board member, National War Labor Board. Mr. Hook is assistant to the president of Rustless Iron & Steel Corporation, Baltimore, Md.

Walter Knauss. Education: Cornell University. Experience:'1943 to present hearings officer and employer board member, National War Labor Board. 1941 to present, executive assistant and executive secretary of Manufacturers Association of Hartford County. 1930–41, self-employed as merchant. 1922–29, athletic director of St. Lawrence University.

Roy W. Moore, Education: Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Cornell University, Harvard University. Experience: 1943 to present, mediation representative and employer board member, National War Labor Board. 1934 to present, Canada Dry Ginger Ale, Inc., president. 1932–34 Long Beach on the Ocean, vice president. 1929–32, Guaranty Trust Co., trust supervisor, 1915–29, prosecuting attorney for State of Georgia.

Charles S. Roberts. Education: University of Illinois. Experience: 1943 to present, hearings officer and employer board member, National War Labor Board. 1934 to present, White Cap Co., asssitant to president. 1919–31, Advertisers Illustrating Co., president and general manager. 1918-19, United States Navy. 1912–18, attorney for Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Co.

John P. Roache. Education: Duquesne University, University of Pittsburgh. Experience: Since 1939 Mr. Roache has served as secretary and assistant to the president of Oliver Iron & Steel Corporation.

Almon E. Roth. Education: Stanford University. Experience: 1942 to present, mediation representative and employer board member, National War Labor Board. 1939 to present, San Francisco Employers Council, president. 1937–39, Waterfront Employers Association of the Pacific Coast, president; 1919-37, Stanford University, comptroller and business manger. 1915-19 attorney for Pillsbury, Madim & Sutro.

Russell A. Smith. Education: Grinnell College, University of Michigan. Experience: 1944 to present, commission member and employer board member, National War Labor Board. 1942 to present, attorney for Pan American Petrol & Transportation Co. 1937–42, University of Michigan, professor of law. 1934–37, attorney for Crarth, Swaine & Noore law firm.

BOARD MEMBERS REPRESENTING THE EMPLOYEES

Regular employee board member.:.
American Federation of Labor:

George Meany. Experience: 1942 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. 1941-42, labor member for Office of Production Management. 1940 to present, secretary-treasurer, American Federation of Labor. 1934-40, president of New York State Federation of Labor. 192234, business representative of Plumbers Local Union No. 463, New York City: 1915, journeyman plumber. 1910, apprentice plumber.

Mathew Woll. Education: Lake Forest University. Experience: 1942 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. In 1929 Mr. Woll was elected first vice president of the American Federation of Labor. 1906–29, president of International Photo-Engravers l'nion of North America. In addition, Mr. Woll is director of legal bureau and chairman of the committee on education and social security, American Federation of Labor. He is president of the Workers Education Bureau and Union Labor Life Insurance Co.

Congress of Industrial Organizations:

Van A. Bittner. Experience: 1942 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. 1942 to present, assistant to President Philip Murray, of the United Steelworkers of America, Congress of Industrial Organizations. Since 1909, Mr. Bittner has been an officer of the United Jine Workers of America and director of the Steelworkers Organizing Committee for the western region.

R. J. Thomas. Education: Wooster College. Experience: 1942 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. 193 president of Chrysler Local No. 7, and international president of the United Automobile Workers, and at present holds post of vice president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations. Since 1933 Mr. Thomas has been employed in the

automobile industry. Alternative employee board members. American Federation of Labor:

Martin P. Durkin. Experience: 1942 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. 1943-45, president of United Association of Plumbers and Steamfitters of United States and Canada. 1941-43, secretary and treasurer of United Association of Plumbers and Steamfitters of United States and Canada. 1936–40, Commissioner of Labor of State of Illinois.

Robert J. Watt. Experience: 1942 to present, employee board member, Xational War Labor Board. Prior to his service with the National War Labor Board, Mr. Watt was a member of the National Defense Mediation Board. In 1938 he was appointed by President Roosevelt to the commission to study labor and industrial conditions in Great Britain and Sweden. He has also been the international American delegate since 1936 when he was elected to attend the International Labor Organization. Mr. Watt also represented American labor at conventions held at Geneva, Switzerland, and at various European capitals. He was elected president of the Lawrence, Mass., Central Labor Union, and was secretary-treasurer of the Massachusetts Staté

Federation of Labor.
Congress of Industrial Organizations:

John Brophy. Experience: 1944 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. At the present time Mr. Brophy is director of Congress of Industrial Organizations Industrial Union Councils. He was part of the original group that set up the Congress of Industrial Organizations following the American Federation of Labor convention in 1935 and was its national director from that date until late in 1939. He was also active in the organization work of the automobile industry in 1937 and 1938 and participated in the negotiations which resulted in the first national agreement with General Motors Corporation. Mr. Brophy joined the United Mine Workers of America in 1899 and for 10 years was president of Bituminous District No. 2, United Mine Workers of America, in central Pennsylvania.

Emil Rieve. Experience: 1942 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board; 1941-42, labor member, National Defense Mediation Board. Mr. Rieve has been president of the Textile Workers Union of America, Congress of Industrial Organizations, since 1939. He has been vice president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations since 1938, and also vice chairman of the American Labor Party and secretary of the

National Planning Association. abstitute employee board members. American Federation of Labor:

James A. Brownlow. Experience: 1943 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board; 1937 to present, secretary-treasurer of Colorado State Federation of Labor; 1941-42, labor-relations assistant in Office of Production Management; 1935–37, manager of municipal airport at Denver, Colo.; 1937, secretary to Gov. Teller Ammons of State of Colorado; 1933–35, member of House of Representatives of State of Colorado.

John H. Leonard. Experience: 1944 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board; 1925–44, Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Motor Coach' Employees of America, Detroit, Mich. Mr. Leonard is also international representative and secretary of the State of Massachusetts legislation committee.

Louis A. Lopez. Experience: 1942 to present, mediation representative and employee board member, National War Labor Board; 1939 to present, president of Printing Pressmen's Union No. 1; 1933–41, Government Printing Office. Mr. Lopez is international representative and school trustee of the International Printing Pressmen's and Assistants' Union of North America.

Raymond T. McCall. Experience: 1944 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board; 1943 to present, general organizer of International Brotherhood of Teamsters; 1937–43, business agent for Bakery Drivers Local Union 494.

Elmer Everett Walker. Experience: 1944 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. 1943–44, head labor representative, Smaller War Plants Corporation. 1941-43, head labor representative of War Production Board. 1942, grand lodge representative, International Association of Machinists. 1941-42, senior apprentice of field representative for apprenticeship, United States Department of Labor. 1937–40, labor relations director, Holly Sugar Co., 1933–37, business representative, International Association of Machinists. 1916–33, machinist in following companies: Monsanto Chemical Co., Monsanto, Ill.; Key Co., East St.

Louis, Ill.; General Steel Casting Co., Granite City, Ill., etc. Congress of Industrial ganizations:

Neil Brant. Education: Cornell University. Experience: 1944 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. 1942–45, Washington representative of United Electrical Workers of America. 1937 to present, international representative of United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America. 1937–40, secretary of New Jersey Labor's Nonpartisan League.

Richard T. Frankensteen. Education: University of Detroit, University of Dayton. 1942 to present, mediation representative and employee board member, National War Labor Board. Mr. Frankensteen has been vice president of the United Automobile Workers, Congress of Industrial Organizations, since 1937. In 1936 he was elected to the board of the United Automobile Workers. From 1934 to 1936, Mr. Frankensteen was president of the Automotive Industrial Workers Association, which was later affiliated with the American Federation of Labor, and still later became the United Automobile Workers, Congress of Industrial Organizations.

Delmond Garst. Experience: 1942 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. Mr. Garst is a national representative of the Congress of Industrial Organizations. Until the year 1937 he held the position of an officer of the local union of the United Automobile Workers Union. In 1936, he was elected a member of the international executive board of the United Automobile Workers.

Carl J. Shipley. Experience: 1943 to present, employee board member, National War Labor Board. 1943 to present, international representative of United Automobile Workers of America. 1937-43, secretary-treasurer of Bendix Local, No. 9. Since 1929 Mr. Shipley has served with Bendix Products Corporation, but is now on leave of absence.

David R. Stewart. Experience: 1942 to present, mediation representative and employee board member, National War Labor Board. 1932 to present, Cities Service Oil Co. in Indiana.

DURATION OF AGENCY

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. The duration of your agency is what?

Dr. TAYLOR. As respects disputes it is until 6 months after the cessation of hositilities. The wage stabilization aspect of the Board's work is derived from the Emergency Price Control Act, which expires on June 30, 1945, which is presently pending for extension. So that we really have two limits on the Board's work.

JURISDICTION OVER WAGE AND SALARY DISPUTES Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Wbat is meant by the statement in your justification indicating that you have jurisdiction over wage and salary disputes on all non-Federal construction? Is that included within the Board's jurisdiction?

Dr. TAYLOR. The Board's jurisdiction on disputes is that it must finally resolve all labor disputes which would interfere with the successful prosecution of the war. Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Federal or non-Federal?

Dr. TAYLOR. There is no distinction between them. As far as the Federal projects are concerned, you probably know that there was this arrangement of the Wage Adjustment Board which was set up by agreement between various procurement agencies with the Department of Labor prior to our Board's having jurisdiction over wage disputes, so that federally financed projects were initially in the Wage Adjustment Board. As respects disputes in the other areas of the construction industry, we have delegated authority direct to the Building and Construction Industries Wage Adjustment Board, because of its familiarity with the construction problem.

PURPOSE OF TELEPHONE PANEL

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I notice you have a Telephone Panel. That is on the theory that trouble there can affect the war effort?

Dr. Taylor. We had this problem, Mi. Wigglesworth, in the telephone industry. We had been handling them on a local basis with our regionel boards; and those that represented the workers and employers in the field said it was very difficult to handle their wage pattern on an area basis. Both groups said, “We think you have got to look at it on a country-wide basis.” When we looked into the matter we agreed with the telephone company and the unions involved and felt it was very desirable to set up this panel to handle it. The results have been very gratifying. The threatened wave of disturbances in that industry has receded almost completely as the result of that change in method of handling telephone cases.

Mr. KHEEL. I might say that in addition to the Bell System, which has a whole series of separately operating companies for each area, there are 6,000 independent telephone companies under the jurisdiction of the Board.

Mr. TABER. There are very few of those that have employees enough so that they get to the Board?

Dr. TAYLOR. They come on Form 10. They say, “We want to put this wage adjustment into effect." It was that kind of case that was going to the regional boards, and we found they were appraising requests to increase wages on their knowledge of wages prevailing in that area rather than in relation to the telephone industry.

Mr. Taber. There are some substantial companies, but the biggest part of them are very small set-ups with two or three or four employees.

Dr. Taylor. A great number of them are very small companies of that sort.

Mr. TABER. Covering a rural community, largely?
Dr. TAYLOR. Yes, sir.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I do not believe I will take any more time, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. TABER. I have two or three questions.

JURISDICTION OVER MILK FARM DISPUTES

You people have consented at least to taking jurisdiction over disputes with reference to some of these milk farms. Can you tell us about that and what your authority for doing so was?

Dr. TAYLOR. Mr. Freidin would know more about that, if you would care to have him discuss that, Mr. Taber. He is our general counsel.

Mr. TABER. There was a case where members of the Teamsters Union attempted to tell these people that they must put their farm employees into the union regardless of whether or not the farm employees wanted to join.

Mr. FREIDIN. When the case you have in mind came to us, Congressman, that was not the situation. This company had, some time before the case which involved the Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co. reached our Board, voluntarily agreed to recognize the teamsters union as the representative only of its employees who were engaged, some 17 in number, I believe, in bottling work. The company and the union also agreed voluntarily, before the case came to us, upon : closed shop. When the case came to us, consequently there was no dispute between the company and the union over the terms of the agreement insofar as recognition of the unoin was concerned or of the type of security clause which was to govern relations between the parties. The case before us involved other terms and conditions of the contemplated collective-bargaining agreement. There was a question, when the case reached us, as to whether or not we did have jurisdiction under the War Labor Disputes Act, since for our purposes under the War Labor Disputes Act the term "employee" is defined as it is in the National Labor Relations Act which, as you know, excludes agricultural labor.

The New Case Committee to which the case was first referred sent it to me for opinion. We examined the law with some care. We also consulted with the general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board. We found that the National Labor Relations Board had on several occasions had this very question before it; namely, the status as employees under the National Labor Relations Act of employees on a dairy farm engaged in bottling milk. The National Laboi Relations Board ruled that those employees are not under the exemp tion referred to. Under the War Labor Disputes Act we are bound to conform to the National Labor Relations Act in interpretations placed upon the act by the National Labor Relations Board, and we conse quently felt bound in the Walker-Gordon cas2 to treat employees as the National Labor Relations Board had treated similar employees, and we rendered an opinion in that case to that effect.

I may say that no action has been taken by the Board in that con nection yet. The case has been referred in accordance with our ordi nary procedure to a hearing panel.

Mr. TABER. How long is that opinion of yours?
Mr. FREIDIN. I have it here, sir. It is not very long.
Mr. TABER. Two or three pages?
Mr. FREIDIN. Three sheets and a little bit over.

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