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Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Your position is that the reduction is $306,000 plus $290,000, roughly, or $600,000 or thereabouts?

Mr. LITTLE. That is right.
Mr. KHEEL. It is $624,895.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Almost all of that reduction is reflected in your special projects. Almost all of your items outside your special projects reflect some increases?

Mr. KHEEL. That is correct. Except for the Legal Division the increases are minor.

STUDIES MADE BY BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS FOR NATIONAL WAR

LABOR BOARD

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. What can you say about the value of that first special project, the Bureau of Labor Statistics? I see you plan to cut it substantially, but how necessary is it to you now that you have it under way?

Mr. KHEEL. What remains is what we figure to be the minimum requirements. I should explain first the collection of wage data to enable us to set up what we call wage brackets.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. That is all done, is it not?

Mr. KHEEL. That is practically concluded. There are some industries in some areas which have not yet been completed or which may have to be revised. That is part of the current estimate. There are also special cases that come up which require a survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. What is this $427,000 going to cover?

Mr. KHEEL. It will cover the completion of this wage bracket pro gram of those industries and areas which we have not yet completed It will cover special projects in connection with individual cases where we require a survey of rates or what the night shift bonuses are, and so forth. It also includes an item for mechanical tabulation of figure which they perform for us.

Dr. TAYLOR. I would like to say, if I may, that it is quite correc that the major job of getting these data together to use as a measuring rod has been completed in bulk, but it goes on rather continuously a new industries come before the Board for the first time, and the Boar has for the first time what amounts to a new case, so that it woul have to make a new wage survey to determine the question. Als there are new plants opening up in new areas, and our job is beginnin to take on this characteristic, that a plant will be turned over fror the manufacture of airplane parts to the manufacture of some civilia items, and it becomes necessary to go into how it affects wages tha have been stabilized and to make a determination on its submissio for a new line of products. This new aspect of the work is going t require not anywhere near like the surveys we formerly had, but is going to require a reanalysis.

SERVICES PERFORMED BY WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION FOR N. W. L. 1

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Do you need all that money in the Wage ar Hour Division-$2,609,000?

Mr. KHEEL. Yes, sir. It represents a decrease over what w received last year.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. It is chiefly enforcement, is it not? Mr. KHEEL. That is a large part of it, but not all of it. We were able to get the service of the Wage and Hour Division to act as the door through which cases have come to the War Labor Board, voluntary cases. They had offices throughout the country, and in this way it was not necessary for us to open up a series of field offices throughout the country. They received these, applications, helped employers fill them out, and transmit them to us. They also advised people by giving a formal and official ruling as to whether or not they had to secure the approval of the War Labor Board. There are certain types of wage adjustments that can be made without our approval, and the Wage and Hour Division performs that function by advising the applicants. Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. With this willingness to comply with your decisions that you have told us about, why do you need $2,600,000 for the Wage and Hour Division and an increase of $338,000 in your attorneys' division for enforcement work?

Dr. TAYLOR. The enforcement work or the wage and hour work do yot have to do with compliance with the Board's orders in dispute ases. The Wage and Hour operates in this sort of situation where, or instance, an employer puts in a new item. He determines that $1 in hour is about right. There is a question in his mind. Does he are to come to the War Labor Board? He can file a form with the Mage and Hour Division, who says, “No; you go ahead and put this 2. It is not necessary for you to go through the routine." He is ben certain that no question will be raised about it, and he is in the lear.

A great deal of the work of the Wage and Hour Division is really in dvising employers that it is perfectly all right to make certain djustments; they are not going to get into any difficulties as the result I the wage adjustments they want to make. Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Do they run around making investigations > see whether or not there is compliance? Dr. TAYLOR. They make inspections, too. Wr. WIGGLESWORTH. How much of this amount would that be? ifty percent, seventy-five percent, or what?

Dr. Taylor. They are not special investigations, as you know. list of them are incident to their regular examinations under the Fair abor Standards Act. Jr. KHEEL. I would say about 50 percent, I should judge, of the spropriation would be in connection with enforcement work. I think I might explain the manner in which we use the terms aforcement" and "compliance." We use the word “compliance'

refer to those cases where we issue an order in a dispute case and pre is a refusal to obey it. We use the word “enforcement" to refer

those cases where an employer has given a wage increase without tting the approval of the War Labor Board. The Wage and Hour vision has nothing to do with the first type of case. They have to only with the second type. Sir. WIGGLESWORTH. When were your estimates ready, Dr. Taylor? ben did you have your hearings before the Budget Bureau? Dr. TAYLOR. Will you answer that, Mr. Kheel? Mr. KREEL. I-believe our estimates were submitted to them in the ter part of January, and the hearings were in the middle of March.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. That is pursuant to the program that they prescribed?

Mr. KHEEL. Yes, sir.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. From your standpoint is there any reasoi they could not have been ready in December or January?

Mr. Kheel. Well, we were ready in the latter part of January They gave us a dead line of January 25 and we met the dead line.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. You furnished, I believe, a statement show ing the number of employees receiving $3,000 a year and up? Mr. KHEEL. That is right.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. And who received promotions during th current fiscal year? Dr. TAYLOR. Yes, sir.

PENALTY MAIL Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I wish you would furnish for the record statement of the amount involved for penalty mail in each of the fiscs years during the Board's operation and the amount involved in thi estimate also. Do you happen to know what that is?

Mr. BERNARD. It is $50,000 in 1946, and $44,400 in 1945.

PUBLICITY AND PUBLIC RELATIONS WORK

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Will you also furnish a similar statement i reference to publicity and public relations work, giving the number people, the dollars and cents, and the type of work done?

Mr. 'KHEEL. I believe we sent a letter to Mr. Taber in response t an inquiry from him on that subject, wherein we explained our publi information personnel.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Do you have something on that, Mr. Taber
Mr. TABER. I think so.
Mr. KHEEL. We can have that inserted in the record.
Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. All right.
(The letter referred to is as follows:)

March 26, 1945. Hon. John TABER,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. My Dear MR. TABER: In your letter of March 20, you requested by April “a statement showing the names, positions, and salaries of those persons up your pay roll engaged in publicity or public relations, part time or full time.

We have no one on our pay roll, part time or full time, engaged in "publicit or public-relations” work. We do, of course, have an Information Divisione gaged in making public the decisions of the Board and explaining Board polici and procedures to businessmen and employees. In this way, the Informatii Division assists in preventing strikes and guiding employers and unions in maki proper applications for wage adjustments.

Many employers, manufacturers' associations, chambers of commerce, lawyer industrial-relations advisers, and unions request copies of all important decisio of the War Labor Board issued by the Information Division. These decision including formal opinions by Board members explaining the actions, provide cor panies and unions with guides to use in settling their own contract disputes wit out bringing the case to the Board.

The Board's work load undoubtedly would be much heavier if these guides we not available to assist the disputing parties, and, of course, the Board prefers have companies settle their own labor problems without adding to the Board already overburdened docket.

The Information Division also prepares with the assistance of the Legal, Wa Stabilization, and Disputes Divisions, a limited number of publications contains the Board's general orders, rules of procedure, and other material to advise companies and unions of their rights and duties under the wage stabilization and disFutes programs. These publications are printed in response to the demand of anployers, chambers of commerce, and others dealing in labor relations.

The attached list includes all persons on the War Labor Board pay roll engaged is informational work. If I can be of any further assistance please do not hesitate to call upon me. Sincerely yours,

GEORGE W. TAYLOR, Chairman.

Public information staff of the War Labor Board

Xame

Title

Grade

Salary

Tshington, Archie W. Robinson, Director... Information Specialist....

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COMPOSITION OF NATIONAL WAR LABOR BOARD Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. How many industry members, how many sbor members, and how many public members are there? Dr. TAYLOR. Of the Board itself? Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Yes.

Dr. TAYLOR. We have four regular industry members with four alternates; we have four regular labor members and four alternates; we have eight public members, and there are substitute members who

for the eight members of labor and industry from time to time in thris absence. The number varies, depending upon the availability the regular and alternate members.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I wish you would give us a little statement for the record as to the regular and alternate members, giving their Games and background, so to speak, as to each one.

Dr. TAYLOR. Would you care to have that for the regional boards slo

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I do not want to encumber the record too mach.

D. TAYLOR. We have the same set-up in each region as we have on thetational board.

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Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. That is pursuant to the program that the prescribed?

Mr. Kheel. Yes, sir.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. From your standpoint is there any reaso they could not have been ready in December or January?

Mr. KHEEL. Well, we were ready in the latter part of January They gave us a dead line of January 25 and we met the dead line.

Mr. WiGGLESWORTH. You furnished, I believe, a statement show ing the number of employees receiving $3,000 a year and up? Mr. KHEEL. That is right.

Mr. WiGGLESWORTH. And who received promotions during th current fiscal year? Dr. Taylor. Yes, sir.

PENALTY MAIL

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I wish you would furnish for the record statement of the amount involved for penalty mail in each of the fisca years during the Board's operation and the amount involved in thi estimate also. Do you happen to know what that is?

Mr. BERNARD. It is $50,000 in 1946, and $44,400 in 1945.

PUBLICITY AND PUBLIC RELATIONS WORK

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Will you also furnish a similar statement il reference to publicity and public relations work, giving the number o people, the dollars and cents, and the type of work done?

Mr. KHEEL. I believe we sent a letter to Mr. Taber in response ti an inquiry from him on that subject, wherein we explained our publi information personnel.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Do you have something on that, Mr. Taber
Mr. TABER. I think so.
Mr. KHEEL. We can have that inserted in the record.
Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. All right.
(The letter referred to is as follows:)

March 26, 1945. Hon. John TABER,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. Taber: In your letter of March 20, you requested by April 11 "a statement showing the names, positions, and salaries of those persons upol your pay roll engaged in publicity or public relations, part time or full time.

We have no one on our pay roll, part time or full time, engaged in publicit] or public-relations” work. We do, of course, have an Information Division en gaged in making public the decisions of the Board and explaining Board policie and procedures to businessmen and employees. In this way, the Informatio Division assists in preventing strikes and guiding employers and unions in makin proper applications for wage adjustments.

Many employers, manufacturers' associations, chambers of commerce, lawyers industrial-relations advisers, and unions request copies of all important decision of the War Labor Board issued by the Information Division. These decisions including formal opinions by Board members explaining the actions, provide com panies and unions with guides to use in settling their own contract disputes with out bringing the case to the Board.

The Board's work load undoubtedly would be much heavier if these guides wery not available to assist the disputing parties, and, of course, the Board prefers i have companies settle their own labor problems without adding to the Board already overburdened docket.

The Information Division also prepares with the assistance of the Legal, Wagt Stabilization, and Disputes Divisions, a limited number of publications containin

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