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Colonel Howse. That is a part of his function also. His supervisory service is spread over the three divisions and not just any one of them.

Mr. TABER. How about this administrative set-up? That relates entirely to the housekeeping of your own organization?

Colonel Howse. That is a housekeeping function.
Mr. TABER. Not the agency, but just your own organization.
Colonel Howse. Just our shop; yes.
Mr. TABER. Now, these other divisions.
Colonel Howse. Yes.

STAFF AND WORK FOR DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR FOR REPORTS AND

INFORMATION

Mr. TABER. The next item here is the one for the Administrator for Reports and Information, with 69 people, totaling $264,000. Where do I get that in this other chart? That is your statistical set-up? What does the Deputy Administrator in his own office with $25,600 have to do? There are 6 people, 2 of whom have salaries above $5,000 in there. What are their jobs?

Colonel Howse. He exercises general supervision over the two divisions, the Information Division and the Reports and Statistics Division, and divides his time between them.

Mr. TABER. And has general charge of that picture; is that his job? Colonel Howse. That is correct; yes.

INFORMATION DIVISION

Mr. Taber. When you get to the Information Division, what do they do?

Colonel HowsE. Their functions consist of establishing policies providing full and complete information on the sale of surplus property. I mentioned on Friday, I think, that one of the principal difficulties that we have facing us is the dissemination of full and complete information to the public and to the people interested in purchasing surplus property, in such manner that they will not be confused any more than is necessary between the eight or nine disposal agencies.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. You have a director at $8,000, an assistant at $6,500, and two more communication liaison people at $6,500. There are also six informational specialists at $5,600.

Colonel HOWSE. That is correct yes.
Mr. WIGGLES WORTH. A total of 24 for information purposes.
Colonel HowsE. Yes; one for each principal category:

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. What will you do with 24 people on information?

Colonel Howse. The communication liaison people that you have referred to, Mr. Wigglesworth, are congressional liaison, one for the House and one for the Senate.

Mr. WIGGLES WORTH. What can you do with 24 people?

Colonel HowsE. I do not know any better way to answer you than

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. Are you going into moving pictures and radio and all the trappings?

Colonel Howse. I hope no trappings, Mr. Wigglesworth. We are trying to set up one system to which each disposal agency will contribute a portion of its efforts.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. They all have their own information set-ups, do they not?

Colonel Howse. They have, but there is no unification. That is where the difficulty arises now in the minds of the public who want to buy surplus property.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. What is the 0. W. I. doing?

Colonel Howse. The 0. W. I. has no connection, within my knowledge, with this program.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. They are going to coordinate and unify all information on surplus property, are they not?

Colonel Howse. Not to my knowledge, no, sir.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I thought they coordinated all governmental information on all topics, or tried to.

Colonel Howse. I am not prepared to state what they consider their functions.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. It seems to me they mentioned specifically this matter of surplus property disposal the other day when they were before the committee.

Mr. TABER. Is that a new one for you?

Colonel Howse. It is not a new one exactly. It is one that I do not know anything about. I am not prepared to defend the 0. W. I.'s budget.

Mr. TABER. Who is the person who has charge of this information set-up, or is he not yet?

Colonel Howse. He is not yet.
Mr. TABER. Is he coming out of the O. W. I.?
Colonel HowsE. No. He has no connection with the 0. W. I.
Mr. TABER. Where is he coming from?
Colonel Howse. We have yet to get him.

Mr. TABER. How is he going to keep all these people busy--these indivudal agencies will be sending out stuff on each of the things that they have to do, will they not?

Colonel Howse. In their own segments, yes; that is correct. Mr. Taber. Why do they have a set-up if you are going to do it? That is the thing that I do not understand. You have an informational specialist for each one of these set-ups and besides each one of them has a set-up of its own. I just do not understand that.

Colonel Howse. Perhaps I have not explained the proposition very well, Mr. Taber. We are not going to do the public relations work and the information work for the various disposal agencies. We are going only to coordinate the activities into a unified picture for the public and the Congress. In addition the information division will be responsible for developing information regarding the progress of disposing of surplus property for reports to the Congress and for special reports as required. "The Board has a definite responsibility to keep the Congress and the public informed regarding the over-all status of surplus property disposal.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. How much of this set-up is really in being now?

Colonel Howse. I do not know exactly. I can give you a memorandum on that if you would like to have it.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. I think that we ought to have some idea of what you have on the rolls now with respect to this set-up, or each of your set-ups.

On page 2 of your justifications, the revised justifications, it seems to me that we ought to have not only the positions that you are requesting, but that we ought to know what is in being at the moment, and what you have on your rolls.

Mr. BURROWS. The reason that we did not do so is because our organization is a skeleton organization at the moment. We inherited very little from the Surplus War Property Administration and, pending these decisions, have not been able to recruit the people that are necessary to do the job. Therefore, any relationship between what we propose and what we have now is not at all a normal relationship.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. It may not be normal from one standpoint, but I think it would be helpful to this committee to see what is actually on the rolls now and what you have been working with.

Colonel Howse. We will be glad to furnish a statement Mr. Wigglesworth; to that effect.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. You could just put another column on that table on page 2. That would be helpful insofar as it goes anywhere

(The information has been furnished under "Office of the Board on p. 1193.)

RESEARCH AND STATISTICS DIVISION

Mr. TABER. Now, this Research and Statistics Division, how much of that do you have now?

Colonel Howse. You have me at a disadvantage all through this entire chart. I cannot tell you with any degree of exactitude what we have minutely down through these divisions, but I will furnish a table for the committee.

Mr. TABER. For statistics, why do you need 39 people at $148,100? That is practically $4,000 apiece, on an average. That does not include this overtime or this pay raise that is in sight, whichever becomes effective. Why do you need any such set-up as that?

Colonel Howse. I think probably the simplest answer, Mr. Taber, is that they are needed to prepare that monthly, quarterly, and special reports as to each category of surpluses.

Mr. TABER. How will such a number of people as that be needed? These other outfits will have their own research set-ups and their own statistics set-ups. This will be a sort of overhead that will throw the thing together from the statistics that are handed them by the agencies; is that not correct? Colonel Howse. That is part of it, Mr. Taber, certainly. Mr. TABER. Is that not about all that they have to do?

Colonel Howse. The balance of it you might charge off to research work and economic studies of our own to provide the necessary background for the formulation of policies and regulations.

Mr. Taber. It seems to me an outfit with four or five people in it with a stenographer or a statistical clerk apiece could cover the job.

Colonel Howse. I might also point out, if you do not mind moving over to the Industrial Properties Division, in the plant set-up there we are required under the act to submit to the Congress, reports on the 12 categories of industry itemized therein, and our research people will be working with these technical people in the preparation of the congressional reports.

Mr. Taber. Why would you need any such number? It seems to me this would be pretty well overdone in the set-up.

Colonel HOWSE. A report to the Congress on the iron and steel industry, for example, Mr. Taber, will include marketing surveys, analyses of freight rates, analyses of post-war possibilities in certain regions, and so forth, and will have to do with the disposition of all the iron and steel plants. It is a highly technical and highly complicated report which will be furnished with scientific data and information gathered by industrial engineering firms and people of that caliber. Under our plants set-up we worked a great deal with the O'Mahoney committee of the Senate and also the Department of Justice, as well as with the Colmer Post-war Planning Committee of the House, and have, we think at least, agreed upon the form and the content of the report. This amount is going to be a drop in the bucket compared to the efforts that will be expended on each report by the various disposal agencies and the other governmental agencies.

We have asked in the Plart Division, for example, for one man to handle the whole iron and steel industry program. It might be difficult to reduce that one man to any less personnel.

Mr. TABER. They will still have a set-up of that same kind with a lot more help in the R. F.C. on that particular business, will they not?

Colonel Howse. They will need a great deal of help in the R. F. C.; yes.

WORK OF DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR FOR INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY Mr. TABER. This will be an over-all agency that will be operating in that industrial property proposition where you have an overhead set-up of 6. Then under that you have a Materials Division with 10. You have a Machinery and Equipment Division with 10, and a Plant Division with 33.

WORK OF MATERIALS DIVISION I do not know what the Materials Division is going to amount to; Is that a very big item or not?

Colonel HOWSE. Well, Mr. Taber, it is. It includes all raw materials and all unprocessed materials, scrap

Mr. Taber. Scrap will come under them?
Colonel Howse. Scrap will be one of the items included.

Mr. TABER. I thought each constituent agency was being allowed to dispose of its own scrap.

Colonel Howse. That is correct, but this again is a policy making group making determinations as to how scrap will be handled. might go into a question at issue at the particular moment--the scrap abroad. Should certain types of scrap be brought home? Should tanks be brought home and scrapped after they are received here, or should they be converted to scrap abroad and the residuc be sold abroad? The same question arises in the disposition of airplanes. This Division, in which there are 10 people, covers the entire field of raw material, any unprocessed goods, scrap; they have to do with the stock piling of metals and minerals as required by the act and in conjunction with the Army-Navy Munitions Board; they have to do with establishing policies and converting the stock piles to civilian use under certain circumstances.

Mr. Taber. Are they very big stock piles?

On page 2 of your justifications, the revised justifications, it seems to me that we ought to have not only the positions that you are requesting, but that we ought to know what is in being at the moment, and what you have on your rolls.

Mr. BURROWS. The reason that we did not do so is because our organization is a skeleton organization at the moment. We inherited very little from the Surplus War Property Administration and, pending these decisions, have not been able to recruit the people that are necessary to do the job. Therefore, any relationship between what we propose and what we have now is not at all a normal relationship

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. It may not be normal from one standpoint, but I think it would be helpful to this committee to see what is actually on the rolls now and what you have been working with.

Colonel Hows. We will be glad to furnish a statement Mr. Wigglesworth; to that effect.

Mr. WIGGLESWORTH. You could just put another column on that table on page 2. That would be helpful insofar as it goes anywhere

(The information has been furnished under "Office of the Board" on p. 1193.)

RESEARCH AND STATISTICS DIVISION Mr. TABER. Now, this Research and Statistics Divisicn, how much of that do you have now?

Colonel Howse. You have me at a disadvantage all through this entire chart. I cannot tell you with any degree of exactitude what we have minutely down through these divisions, but I will furnish a table for the committee.

Mr. Taber. For statistics, why do you need 39 people at $148,100? That is practically $4,000 apiece, on an average. That does not include this overtime or this pay raise that is in sight, whichever becomes effective. Why do you need any such set-up as that?

Colonel Howse. I think probably the simplest answer, Mr. Taber. is that they are needed to prepare that monthly, quarterly, and special reports as to each category of surpluses.

Mr. TABER. How will such a number of people as that be needed These other outfits will have their own research set-ups and their own statistics set-ups. This will be a sort of overhead that will throw the thing together from the statistics that are handed them by the agencies; is that not correct? Colonel Howse. That is part of it, Mr. Taber, certainly. Mr. TABER. Is that not about all that they have to do?

Colonel Howse. The balance of it you might charge off to research work and economic studies of our own to provide the necessary background for the formulation of policies and regulations.

Mr. Taber. It seems to me an outfit with four or five people in it with a stenographer or a statistical clerk apiece could cover the job.

Colonel Howse. I might also point out, if you do not mind moving over to the Industrial Properties Division, in the plant set-up there we are required under the act to submit to the Congress, reports on the 12 categories of industry itemized therein, and our research people will be working with these technical people in the preparation of the congressional reports.

Mr. TABER. Why would you need any such number? It seems to me this would be pretty well overdone in the set-up.

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