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THE UNIVERSITY OF MOLIGAN LIBRARIES

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS OUT OF POSTAL headquarters except the research and engineering staff;
FUND-Continued

ADMINISTRATION AND REGIONAL OPERATION-Continued

and includes the money order audit activity in Washing-
ton, D.C., the reimbursement to Treasury Department for
processing of paid money orders, and the 1966 biennial
fidelity bond premium of all employees.

solely on the certificate of the Postmaster General; [and not to
exceed $25,000 for rewards for information and services as provided
for herein, shall be paid in the discretion of the Postmaster General
and accounted for solely on his certificate; and] $88,100,000: Pro-
vided, That hereafter settlement of claims, pursuant to law, current
and prior fiscal years, for damages, and for losses resulting from
unavoidable casualty shall be paid from postal revenues [; $85,500,-
000]. (5 U.S.C. 22, 22a, 30q, 43, 61g, 73b-3, 87c, 150, 785, 836-
840, 901, 911-913, 921, 922, 926, 943, 944, 1003, 1006, 1010,
1011, 1111-1114, 1124, 2061-2066, 2091-2103, 2121-2123, 2131-
2133, 2201, 2203, 2205, 2301-2319, 3001-3014; 28 U.S.Ć. 1346,
2671-2672, 2677; 31 U.S.C. 22a, 82a-1, 82a-2, 695, 725a; 39
U.S.C. 302, 304-309, 501, 502, 509, 701, 702, 903, 905, 2001-2006,
2202, 2204, 2206-2208, 2211, 2302, 2304, 2331, 2401, 2403, 2409,
2411, 2501-2508, 3105, 3301, 3311, 3335, 3511-3542, 5001, 5005-
5007, 5011, 5101-5103, 5208; Post Office Department Appropriation
Act, 1965.)

2. Field inspection service. This activity provides for the postal inspection and internal audit services. Postal inspection includes all field investigation and inspection functions pertaining to violation of the postal laws, prevention and detection of mail loss and mistreatment and losses of Government funds and property, field audit of postmasters' accounts, personnel security and suitability investigations, and special surveys and investigations. The internal audit program includes comprehensive reviews and financial audits of activities at the departmental level, regional offices and other selected field installations.

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

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Accrued annual leave.
Employees compensation
liability
Unpaid undelivered orders.

Total selected re

sources--

1963 -7, 307 -211

1964 actual

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1964 adjustments

1965 1966 estimate estimate

500
87

149 -149

81,507 85,500

1,941

87,441

1964 -7,594 248

85,500

1965 -8, 134 -264

18.498 22,073

47.709

88,280

-180

88,100

88,100

88,100

88,100

1966 -8, 314 -264

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-7,369 -149 -7,842

-8,398 -8,578

This appropriation provides for the direction and control of the postal establishment. The budget estimate for 1966 is $88.1 million, an increase of $659 thousand over 1965 and $7.9 million over 1964.

Payments formerly made from this appropriation for the settlement of personal and property damage claims arising out of the operation of the postal service and for losses resulting from unavoidable casualties will be paid from postal revenue beginning in 1966.

1. Executive direction and administration. This ac

tivity provides for all offices and bureaus at Washington

25.2 Services of other agencies.

26.0 Supplies and materials..

42.0 Insurance claims and indemnities.
Total obligations..

99.0

Total number of permanent positions..
Full-time equivalent of other positions.
Average number of all employees.
Average GS grade...
Average GS salary.

Average postal field service level.
Average postal field service salary.

1964

actual

Personnel Summary

66,097
205

543

66,845

5,034

4,854

130
4

4

516

662
42

1964

actual

7,812
44

220

724

43

2,106 2,615

80,197

87,441

7,569

9.4

1965 estimate

$9.421

4.5 $6,085

71,948
206

521

4

4

1966 estimate

72,675 75,142

5,405 5.597 5,566

5,819

185

162

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74.430

9.6 $10.248

4.5 $6,455

88,100

1965 1966 estimate estimate

7,512 7,778 40 42 7.704 7,522

9.7 $10,425

4.5

$6,486

RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND Engineering

For expenses necessary for administration and conduct of a research, development, and engineering program, including services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U.S.C. 55a), [and including not to exceed $2,000,000 for reimbursement of reimbursable contracts in addition to current increases in prior year orders or contracts as a result of changes in plans under such program, $12,000,000] $13,000,000, to remain available until (5 U.S.C. 22a, 1133; 6 U.S.C. 14; 39 U.S.C. 309, 501,

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1964 actual

750-100-65- -48

10,511

810

11,321

752

12,073

3,007 3,528 4,069 1,822 2,000 1,500 5,666 11,439 7.441 20

16

16,987

1965 1966 estimate estimate

-87 11,913

1964

adjustments

16,987 969

17,956

-5.956

-6,116
5,956

11,913 12,000 13,000

13,010

12,000 12,000 13,000

13,010 -10

13,000

12,000 13,000

- 15 - 16 8, 293 9, 293

Accrued annual leave.

Employees compensation liabil

1964 1965 1966 -345 -375 -385 -16 9,293

-14

ity....
Unpaid undelivered orders..... 7,703

-180

Total selected resources.. 7,362 <-180 7,933 8,902 8,892

This no-year appropriation provides for a research, development, and engineering program estimated for 1966 at $13 million, a decrease of $5 million from 1965 and an increase of $0.9 million over 1964.

1. Direct operation. This activity provides for the administration of a research, development, and engineering program for the Postal Establishment. It includes the conduct of research, development, and engineering activities not performed under contract, and the development of: (1) preliminary layouts and designs for postal buildings and mechanized equipment, (2) better work methods, procedures, and manpower utilization systems, and (3) the Headquarters program for the design, develop ment and testing of new postal equipment and materials. It also funds the personal services required for the operation of the postal laboratory.

2. Contract engineering. This activity provides for contract procurement of engineering services used primarily in the replacement and modernization of facilities and equipment. The replacement of that portion of the contract engineers who are presently engaged in research and development and management engineering activities with permanent civil service personnel is planned in 1966.

3. Contract research and development. This activity includes funds for the design, development, test and evaluation of new postal equipment, materials and techniques required to reduce costs, improve service and

improve employee working conditions. The work is primarily performed by other government agencies or by private industry under contract. Funds are also included in this activity for supplies and material used in testing and evaluating equipment at the postal laboratory.

Work performed under most research and development contracts runs over a period of more than 1 year and, because of its nature, is generally done on cost-plus-afixed-fee basis. At times the scope is of such magnitude as to require several years for completion. Therefore, obligations incurred in any one year are not necessarily indicative of the level of work actually performed. In order to provide flexibility required in programing research projects, funds in this appropriation are available until expended.

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

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OPERATIONS

For expenses necessary for postal operations, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by the Act of September 1, 1954, as amended (5 U.S.C. 2131); for repair of vehicles owned by, or under control of, units of the National Guard and departments and agencies of the Federal Government where repairs are made necessary because of utilization of such vehicles in the postal service, and for other activities conducted by the Post Office Department pursuant to law; [$4,020,000,000 $4,333,900,000: Provided, That not to exceed 5 per centum of any appropriation available to the Post Office Department for the current fiscal year may be transferred, with the approval of the Bureau of the Budget, to any other "Administration and regional operation" shall not be increased by such appropriation or appropriations; but the appropriation more than $1,000,000 as a result of such transfers: Provided further, That functions financed by the appropriations available to the Post Office Department for the current fiscal year and the amounts appropriated therefor, may be transferred, in addition to the appropriation transfers otherwise authorized in this Act and with the approval of the Bureau of the Budget, between such appropriations to the extent necessary to improve administration and operations: Provided further, That Federal Reserve banks and branches may be reimbursed for expenditures as fiscal agents of the United States on account of Post Office Department operations. (5 U.S.C. 73b-3, 87c, 150, 785, 836-840, 922, 944, 2061-2066, 2091-2103, 2121-2123, 2131-2133, 2181-2185, 2301-2319, 3001-3014; 26 U.S.C. 4081; 31 U.S.C. 22a, 82a-1, 82a-2; 39 U.S.C. 309, 501, 502, 701, 703, 706, 2006-2009, 2011, 2202, 2304, 2331, 2501-2505, 2510, 3105, 3301, 3302, 3315, 3333, 3335, 3336, 3501-3582, 4301, 4302, 5001, 50065007, 5101-5103, 6001-6009, 6106, 6351, 6404, 6440; Post Office Department Appropriation Act, 1965.)

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS OUT OF POSTAL increase granted under Public Law 88-426, effective FUND-Continued

July 4, 1964.

OPERATIONS--Continued

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

1. Administration of postal installations. Services are performed under this activity by postmasters, assistant postmasters, supervisors, and technical personnel. These employees are engaged in the local management and supervision of all postal units. Technical personnel under this activity include accounting, finance examiner, medical, safety, and personnel employees.

Program by activities:

1. Administration of postal installations

2. Mail handling and window service....

3. Collection and delivery service.

4. Maintenance service....

5. Vehicle service.
Adjustments to accrued annual leave due to
pay increases..

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1 Selected resources as of June 30, are as follows:

1964 adjustments

80 121 -22

selected

resources. -205, 565

1964 actual

58

497,367 533,173 547,564 1,733,950 1,890,335 1,928,003 1,490,160 1,613,128 1,656,939 118,272 128,731 131,023 70,374 75,320 74,971

4,351

9,600

3,914,474 4,250,287 4,338,500
-12,010-15,514 -4,600
3,902,464 4,234,773 4,333,900

1965 1966 estimate estimate

3,925,000 4,020,000 4,333,900
-8,000

7,000

3,917,000 4,027,000 4,333,900

203,714
4,059

1964

-201, 109

- 18, 472
1,894
170

14,536

2. Mail handling and window service. This activity 3,917,000 4,234,773 4,333,900 provides for the separation and distribution of all mail received in the postal units, including highway and railway post offices. It also includes rendering of window service to patrons, payment for the operation of contract stations, dispatch control of trucks hauling mail, and reimbursements to the Federal Reserve banks for handling deposits made by postmasters.

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-217, 517 -233, 031 -237,631 Funds provided in this appropriation pay the personal services and related expenses required to perform the primary function of the Post Office Department-collecting, sorting, and delivering the mail. The employees paid with these funds include postmasters, who administer the operation of the postal installations; supervisors and clerks, who direct and process the handling of mail along with providing window services to patrons; city carriers, special delivery messengers, and rural carriers, who collect and deliver the mail; maintenance personnel, who keep the buildings and equipment in operating condition; and the vehicle maintenance employees, who service the Government-owned trucks used in hauling mail.

Funds requested for 1966 total $4,334 million, an increase of $99 million over the estimate for 1965. The additional funds will provide the manpower and cover the related expenses necessary to handle the estimated increase of 2.1 billion pieces of mail in 1966, provide delivery service to the additional area and patrons, improve existing services, and cover the full year cost of the pay

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1962.
1963.
1964

1965 (estimate).
1966 (estimate)

It is expected that continued benefits from the efforts to improve operating procedures and cooperation of the mailing public in the pre-preparation of its mailings along with continued mechanization and other programs directed toward a more efficient Postal Service will enable the increase of 3.0% in mail volume to be handled with an increase of 1.6% in clerical manpower in this activity. This compares with a 1.6% increase in manpower to handle a 2.7% increase in mail volume experienced in 1964, and a 1.4% increase in manpower to handle a 2.8% increase in mail volume expected in 1965.

The following table shows a comparison of employment and workload.

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3. Collection and delivery service. This service provides for delivery of mail to residences and business places in cities and their suburbs, collection of mail from over 313,000 street letter boxes and 14,230 building mail chutes in these areas, delivery of mail on rural routes, and delivery of special delivery articles. This service also includes the local pickup and delivery of mail between stations and the post office and other installations. In some instances drivers transport mail between cities. Possible city delivery stops per man-year worked in 1966 are estimated to increase approximately 0.8%. The estimated increase in number of possible stops results from the continuous growth in housing. The number of rural routes to be established in 1966 will be offset by conversions of rural routes to city delivery service and the consolidation of

rural routes for economic reasons.

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1962. 1963

1964

1965 (estimate)

1966 (estimate)

1962 1963.

1964

1965 (estimate)

1966 (estimate)

CITY DELIVERY CARRIERS

[Includes motor vehicle drivers]

11.1 11.3

11.5

150,489

153,465

156,333

158,954

162,456

RURAL CARRIERS

Comparable

man-yearS

worked

Man-years

35,701

35,580

36,050

35,946
35,946

Personnel compensation:
Permanent positions..
Positions other than permanent....
Other personnel compensation...

25.2 Services of other agencies.

26.0 Supplies and materials.

99.0

Total obligations.....

Total personnel compensation...... 12.0 Personnel benefits...

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

1964 actual

21.0 Travel and transportation of persons.
22.0 Transportation of things.........-
23.0 Rent, communications, and utilities.
25.1 Other services.

Total number of permanent positions..
Full-time equivalent of other positions.
Average number of all employees..
Average postal field service level..
Average postal field service salary-
Average salary of ungraded positions..

4. Maintenance service. The services under this activity relate to the maintenance of equipment and protection and cleaning of buildings used by the postal service. The employees under this activity include, among others, guards, mail handling elevator operators, janitors, and mechanics to service mechanical and electronic mail handling and office equipment.

5. Vehicle service. This activity provides for the maintenance and operating cost of vehicles used for the local collection and delivery of mail and in some instances the transport of mail between cities. This includes employment of vehicle mechanics; the purchase of parts, gasoline, oil, tires, and contract maintenance; and the cost of hired vehicles used in lieu of Government-owned vehicles when it is economically advantageous.

Personnel Summary

Number of possible slops (thousands)

37,125

38,302

39,154

40,329

41,539

Number of

routes. June 30

31,323

31,299

31,212

31, 200 31,200

431,304
148,665

4.5 $6,085 $5,607

Possible stops
per man-year
worked

246.7

249.6

250.5

253.7

255.7

Average length
of routes
(miles)

2,571,724 2,788,525 2,876,869
746,289 819,869 827,740
150,578 164,414 153,183

57.9

58.7

60.0

60.6
61.2

3,468,591 3,772,808 3,857,792
277,501 298,160 311,542
21,119 23,143 23.326
80,732 82,975 82,215
4,285 4,738
24,874 26,755
454
445
490
24,908 25,749 26, 177
3,902,464 4,234,773 4,333,900

4,477
27,881

437,686 150,930 579,969 588,142

1965 1966 estimate estimate

449, 155 151,408 599,798 4.5 4.5 $6,455 $6,486 $6,019 $6,125

TRANSPORTATION

For payments for transportation of domestic and foreign mails by air, land, and water transportation facilities, including current and prior fiscal years settlements with foreign countries for handling of mail, [$596,500,000 $598,000,000. U.S.C. 22a; 39 U.S.C. 309, 501, 706, 2006, 2202, 2402, 6101-6103, 6105, 6106, 6201-6215,

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1962

1963

"Administration and regional operation"
(77 Stat. 62)

"Operations" (78 Stat. 372).

"Facilities" (77 Stat. 62 and 78 Stat. 372).. "Plant and equipment" (77 Stat. 62) Transferred from "Plant and equipment" (78 Stat. 372).

Appropriation (adjusted).

1964

1965 (estimate)
1966 (estimate).

Pounds
(thousands)

69,518

63,078

68,122

1962.

1963.

1964

1965 (estimate)

1966 (estimate).

73,225

78,893

1964 actual

589,961

Pounds
(thousands)

21.168 21.500 21,800 114,476 121,000 126,841 350,272 341,703 335,100 104,045 107,821 114,259

177,435

175,307

174,863

174,425

174,000

611,000

-500

-5,000
-4,500

1. Surface transportation—(a) Water.-Domestic water transportation service is utilized for the transportation of mail on the inland and coastal waterways at per annum contract rates ($0.8 million in 1966) and at pound rates ($4.2 million in 1966). Pound rate service is utilized for Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, where there is a substantial increase in mail volume.

DATA RELATING TO DOMESTIC WATER TRANSPORTATION

[Pound-rate service]

1965 1966 estimate estimate

11,039

601,000 592,024 598,000

592,024

-7,000

-476

596,500 598,000

3,000

601,000 592,024 598,000

Payments to
carriers

(thousands)
$10,477

10,457

10,424

598,000

Payments to
carriers

(thousands)
$3,663

3,067

3,628

3,900

4,205

DATA RELATING TO FOREIGN WATER TRANSPORTATION

[Pound-rate service]

10,397

10,372

Foreign water transportation covers carriage of mails. by steamship to foreign countries at per pound rates ($10.6 million including $0.2 million for shipment of empty mail bags in 1966). It also includes terminal charges by foreign countries for handling such mail at the port of entry and charges for mails transiting such countries ($6.2 million in 1966). The advantages offered by fast air service between the United States and foreign countries is the apparent reason for the steady decline in the utilization of foreign water transportation.

Average cost per pound (cents)

5.27

4.86

5.33

5.33

5.33

Average cost per pound (cents)

5.90

5.96

5.96

5.96

5.96

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS OUT OF POSTAL Order No. E-21514, effective October 1, 1964, reduced FUND-Continued

TRANSPORTATION-Continued

mail transportation rates for U.S. carriers on the transatlantic and transpacific routes approximately 25%. This order had the effect of reducing foreign airmail transportation costs $4 million in 1965 and $6 million

in 1966.

(b) Highway. This includes transportation of mail by star route, buses, mail messenger, and highway post offices. The estimates for 1966 are as follows:

Star route service..

Area bus contracts..

Mail messenger service..
Highway post offices..

Total......

1962 1963.

1964

1965 (estimate) 1966 (estimate)

1962. 1963.

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1964

1965 (estimate) 1966 (estimate)

Star route service is the major function in the overall
highway transportation activity and provides service
between post offices. The uptrend in the average cost
per mile of star route service and in highway transporta-
tion generally is caused by the growing need for larger 1962.
and more expensive truck equipment where mail volume
is steadily increasing, and by the higher costs due to the
growth in the national economy.

1963.
1964

1965 (estimate)3.
1966 (estimate)3_

DATA RELATING TO TRANSPORTATION BY STAR ROUTES

1962. 1963.

Number

of roules
(end of
year)

Scheduled
miles of
travel
(thousands)

11,279

404,438

11,418

425,725

11,666 455,075

11,919

487,185
512,780

12,019

Mobile highway post offices provide mail distribution en route in contract highway vehicles where adequate train service of this nature does not exist. General price increases have resulted in higher costs to the performing contractors and subsequent adjustment in contract rates is the reason for the increase in the average cost per

mile.

DATA RELATING TO CONTRACT HIGHWAY POST OFFICES

1964.

1965 (estimate).

1966 (estimate).

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Car-foot
miles
(thousands)
16,405,000

16,342,000

16,391,983

16,094,918
15,881,896

(Millions)
$102.3
.8
17.2
6.5

126.8

Annual obligations (thousands)

$5,995

5,949

6,242

6,420

6,505

(c) Rail.-This covers transportation by railroad in the United States and Puerto Rico. The estimate provides for increased mail volume offset in part by necessary diversions from railroad to highway service.

Average rate per mile

(cents)

DATA RELATING TO TRANSPORTATION BY RAILROAD

Railway post office and line haul obligations (thousands)

$276,122
274,568

274,530

269,800

266,400

33.25

33.56

33.54

33.56

34.00

Average cost per thousand car-foot miles

$16.83

16.80

16.75

16.76

16.77

DATA RELATING TO DOMESTIC AIRMAIL TRANSPORTATION I

Payments to Average cost
carriers
per lon-mile
(cents)

(thousands)

36.78

2. Air transportation.-This covers the transportation of mail by air between points within the United States, to U.S. possessions and to foreign countries. CAB Rate

1962.

1963.

1964

1965 (estimate).

1966 (estimate)

1 Includes airlift of nonpriority mail.

DATA RELATING TO FOREIGN AIRMAIL TRANSPORTATION 1

Program by activities:
Operating costs, funded:

Ton-miles (thousands) 170,282

181,703

200,142

212,068

225,051

Capital outlay:

Ton-miles (thousands) 40,101

44,343 241,906

İ. Building occupancy

2. Supplies and services...

1 Excludes military mail for which the Department is reimbursed. Reduction in 1964 reflects transfer of Hawaii and Puerto Rico routes to domestic service.

3 Reduction in average for 1965 and 1966 resulting from CAB Order No. E-21514, effective Oct. 1, 1964.

1. Building occupancy..
2. Supplies and services...
Adjustment to accrued annual leave due
to pay increases..

Total operating costs, funded...

47,078

52,104

FACILITIES

For expenses necessary for the operation of postal facilities, buildings, and [field] postal communication service; uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by the Act of September 1, 1954, as amended (5 U.S.C. 2131); procurement of stamps and accountable paper, and postal supplies; and storage of vehicles owned by, or under control of, units of the National Guard and departments and agencies of the Federal Government; [$199,000,000 $226,000,000. (5 U.S.C. 22a, 73b-3, 87c, 150, 785, 836-840, 922, 944, 1133, 21312133, 2181-2185, 2301-2319, 3001-3014; 6 U.S.C. 14; 31 U.S.C. 22, 82a-1, 82a-2; 39 U.S.C. 309, 501, 503, 704, 2001-2009, 2101-2116, 2202, 2501-2506, 3105, 3301-3302, 3315, 3333, 3335, 3501-3502, 3511-3542, 3551-3576, 3581-3582, 5102, 6003; Post Office Department Appropriation Act, 1965.)

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

Financing:
Unobligated balance lapsing..

New authority..

$62,626

67,318

73,665

78,417

83,491

Total capital outlay.

Total program costs, funded............
Change in selected resources 1.

Total obligations-----

37.05

36.81

36.98

37.10

Payments to Average cost carriers per ton-mile (thousands) (cents) 59.56

$23,885

25,648

57.84 26,349 62.88 25,037 53.18 26,136 50.16

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