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Under existing legislation, 1965.-In connection with its consideration of the regular Labor-Health, Education, and Welfare appropriation bill for 1965, Congress approved an appropriation of $2,780 million for grants to States for old-age assistance, medical assistance for the aged, aid to families with dependent children, aid to the blind, and aid to the permanently and totally disabled under titles I, IV, X, XIV, respectively, of the Social Security Act, as amended; or for assistance payments made under title XVI of the act, as amended.

Recent program trends and estimates submitted by the States indicate that the appropriation for 1965 will fall short of meeting the Federal share of State expenditures by an estimated $407.9 million. This amount includes $41,853 thousand from the 1965 appropriation used to complete 41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 1964 requirements. 99.0 Total obligations.

25.1 Other services..

1964 actual

240

138

Identification code
09-35-1472-01-653

378

89

467

378

57

-32

−7

396

1964 actual

1965 estimate

278

95

240

373

373

373

32 -32

373

1966 estimate

278

54

Public Law 86-571, approved July 5, 1960, provides for hospitalization and services to repatriated mentally ill U.S. nationals until arrangements can be made for assumption of responsibility by States of residence or family. This estimate assumes that a total of 87 mentally ill repatriates will require hospitalization in 1966. This compares with 79 who required hospital care in 1964, and 83 in 1965.

332

Public Law 87-64, approved June 30, 1961, as amended by Public Laws 87-543, approved June 25, 1962, and 88-347, approved June 30, 1964, authorized, under a new section 1113 of the Social Security Act, temporary assistance to U.S. citizens and their dependents who return to this country because of destitution, illness, or international crises and who are without available resources. Temporary assistance is provided for under this program as follows: (a) persons returned from Cuba it is estimated an average of 3 cases per month will receive assistance in 1966 as compared to 22 in 1965 and 52 in 1964; and (b) persons returned from other countriesit is estimated a total of about 116 cases will require some form of assistance in 1966 as compared to 106 in 1965 and 96 in 1964.

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

278

332

332

32

-64

300

1965 1966 estimate estimate

278 54 332

ASSISTANCE FOR REPATRIATED UNITED STATES NATIONALS

For necessary expenses of carrying out section 1113 of the Social Security Act, as amended (42 U.Š.C. 1313), and of carrying out the provisions of the Act of July 5, 1960 (74 Stat. 308), and for care and treatment in accordance with the Acts of March 2, 1929, and October 29, 1941, as amended (24 U.S.C. 191a, 196a), [$373,000]

138 378

95 373

SALARIES AND EXPENSES, BUREAU OF FAMILY SERVICES

For expenses necessary for the Bureau of Family Services, [$5,359,000 $6,256,000. (42 U.S.C., ch. 7, subchs. I, IV, X, XIV and XVI, and sec. 903; Department of Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriation Act, 1965.)

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1966 estimate

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tution, or international crises and who are without avail-
able resources.

1. Program policies and standards.-Requirements of
the Social Security Act are interpreted and specialized
technical assistance is provided to State agencies. There

is special emphasis to assure that problems of public wel-
1,801 fare, including methods of administration, are dealt with

constructively. Considerable emphasis is being placed on
3,563
566

alleviating and preventing dependency to the maximum
326 extent possible through methods such as: increased de-

velopment and utilization of social services, including 6,256

community resources; community work and training pro

grams; and better trained public welfare personnel.
6.256 2. Review State plans and grants, evaluate State opera-

tions.-Action is taken on new State plans and on amend

ments thereto to assure conformity to the act; reviews 106 are made of operations and findings are used to assist

States in administering their programs; consultation and 133

advice are provided on problems arising in day-to-day

operations; grants are processed; information is provided
239 to the public.
6,495

3. Research and statistics.-Information is collected in
cooperation with State agencies. Special analyses are
undertaken to provide national statistics and other infor-

mation on public assistance which are used by the Bureau -239 and the States in formulating policies, planning program

content, setting standards, making legislative recom

mendations, justifying appropriation requests, answering 6,256

requests, and guiding administrative action.

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Total direct program costs, funded.
Change in selected resources :-

Total direct obligations.----
Reimbursable program (Emergency pre-

paredness functions):
1. Program policies and standards.
2. Review State plans and grants,

evaluate State operations....
Total reimbursable program

(costs-obligations) 10

Total obligations.--Financing: 11 Receipts and reimbursements from: Admin

istrative budget accounts for emergency

preparedness functions... 25 Unobligated balance lapsing

New obligational authority

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGANTIRRARI

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Total personnel compensation.
12.0 Personnel benefits..-
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons
22.0 Transportation of things.-
23.0 Rent, communications, and utilities.
24.0 Printing and reproduction...
25.1 Other services.
25.2 Services of other agencies.
26.0 Supplies and materials.
31.0 Equipment.--

6,226

3,661

257 249 14 72 91 35 66 34 52

4,533

330 275

18 75 101 30 68 34 50

109

146

9

140 71 46 54

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- Selected resources as of June 30 are as follows: Unpaid undelivered orders, 1963 $25 thousand (1964 adjustments, --$2 thousand): 1964, $9 thousand; 1965, $9 thousand: 1966, $9 thousand.

The Bureau is responsible for the administration of grant-in-aid programs for old-age assistance, medical assistance for the aged, aid to families with dependent children, aid to the blind, and aid to the permanently and totally disabled. Approximately 8 million

individuals are expected to receive aid under these programs in 1966, involving more than $5.5 billion in Federal, State, and local funds, of which over $3.25 billion will be Federal. These programs are intended to provide financial assistance, medical care, and other social services to assure the minimum essentials of living for specified

groups: needy aged, blind, disabled, and children in families broken by death, incapacity, or absence of a parent, and for some families hard pressed because of unemployment.

The Bureau also administers a program of assistance for repatriated U.S. nationals who are returned from abroad because of mental or other kinds of illness, desti

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WELFARE ADMINISTRATION-Continued

General and special funds-Continued
SALARIES AND EXPENSES, BUREAU OF FAMILY SERVICES-Con.

Personnel Summary

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1964 actual

New obligational authority (appropri-
ation)..

462
4

403

9.3

$9,100

25

16

9.3

$9,100

GRANTS FOR MATERNAL AND CHILD WELFARE

For grants for maternal and child welfare as authorized in title V, parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the Social Security Act, as amended (42 U.S.C., ch. 7, subch. V; 74 Stat. 995-997, and 77 Stat. 273), [$127,830,0001 $162,000,000 of which [$35,000,000 $40,000,000 shall be available for maternal and child-health services under part 1, [$35,000,000] $40,000,000 for services for crippled children under part 2, [$34,000,000 (of which $4,000,000 $40,000,000 (of which $7,000,000 shall be for allotment for day care pursuant to section 527 of such Act) for child welfare services under part 3 (other than section 526), [$5,830,000 $8,000,000 for research, training, or demonstration projects in child welfare under section 526, [$15,000,000 $30,000,000 for special project grants for maternity and infant care under section 531, and [$3,000,000 $4,000,000 for research projects relating to maternal and child health and crippled children's services under section 532 of such Act: Provided, That any allotment to a State pursuant to section 502(b) or 512(b) of such Act shall not be included in computing for the purposes of subsections (a) and (b) of sections 504 and 514 of such Act an amount expended or estimated to be expended by the State: Provided further, That [$3,500,000 $4,750,000 of the amount available under section 502(b) of such

Act shall be used only for special projects for mentally retarded

children, and [$2,500,000] $3,750,000 of the amount available

under section 512(b) of such Act shall be used only for special projects for services for crippled children who are mentally [retarded: Provided further, That after January 1, 1966 no federal funds shall be used to pay in excess of one-half of the cost of day care services under section 527 (a) of the Social Security Act, as amended] retarded. (Department of Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriation Act, 1965.)

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

1964 actual

28,553

29.111

28,975

3,929

4,683

1,500

96,751

2,692

1965 1966 estimate estimate

510

10

459

9.4

$9,782

18

15

9.4

$9,782

1965 estimate

555

10

506

9.5 $9,893

3,000

127,830

35,000 40,000
35,000 40,000
34,000 40,000

5,830

15,000

1966 estimate

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)-Continued

4,000 162,000

Identification code
09-35-1569-0-1-651

Relation of obligations to expenditures:
71 Total obligations (affecting expenditures)..

72 Obligated balance, start of year..

74 Obligated balance, end of year.
77 Adjustments in expired accounts..

90

Expenditures...

20 18 9.5

The States are required to match one-half of the amounts appropriated for maternal and child health and crippled children's services. The remainder is distributed to the States in proportion to their financial need, except that not to exceed 12% of the appropriations for the above programs is available for special project grants to State $9,893 agencies and to public or nonprofit institutions of higher learning. The States are required to match all appropriated funds for child welfare services but the percent of matching required varies from 33% to 66%. There are no specific matching requirements for the programs of grants for research, training, or demonstration projects in child welfare or grants for research projects relating to maternal and child health and crippled children's services.

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2. Crippled children's services.-Grants are made to States to extend and improve services for crippled children including medical, surgical, corrective, and other care, especially in rural areas. It is proposed that $3.75 million of these grants be earmarked for special projects for crippled children who are mentally retarded.

3. Child welfare services.-Grants aid States to establish, extend, and strengthen child welfare services for the protection and care of homeless, dependent, and neglected children, and children in danger of becoming delinquent, and for the return of runaway children to their own homes in other States. It is proposed that of the amount requested for child welfare grants, $7 million will be earmarked for day care services.

4. Research, training, or demonstration projects in child welfare.-Grants are made to public or nonprofit institutions of higher learning or agencies and organizations engaged in research or child welfare activities for projects of regional or national significance or for those which demonstrate new facilities or methods which contribute to the advancement of child welfare, and to public or nonprofit institutions of higher learning for special projects for training personnel for work in the field of child welfare. 5. Special project grants for maternity and infant care.— Grants are made to State or local health agencies for 30,000 special projects for maternity and infant care to help reduce the incidence of mental retardation caused by complications associated with childbearing. The Federal grant cannot exceed 75% of the cost of a project.

8,000

6. Research projects relating to maternal and child health services and crippled children's services.-Grants, contracts, or jointly financed cooperative arrangements are made for research projects relating to maternal and child health and crippled children's services that show promise of substantial contribution to the advancement of these

99,443

127,830

162,000

programs.

96.751 343 -7,722 -16

89,356 106,000 151,000

162,000 29,552

-40,552

1. Maternal and child health services.-Grants are provided to States for the extension and improvement of health services for mothers and children, especially in rural areas. It is proposed that $4.75 million of these grants be earmarked for special projects for mentally retarded children.

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Identification code

1964

1965

1966

he above

to Stara of Liga

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SALARIES AND EXPENSES, CHILDREN'S BUREAU

to State agencies, other public and voluntary agencies For necessary expenses in carrying out the Act of April 9, 1912, as and organizations, and educational institutions engaged amended (42 U.S.C., ch. 6), and title V of the Social Security Act, as in training professional personnel; and guides and recomamended (42 U.S.C., ch. 7, subch. V), including purchase of reports mendations are prepared on the provision of child health and material for the publications of the Children's Bureau and of

services.
reprints for distribution, [$4,295,000] $4,494,000: Provided, That

2. State and local social services for children. --The
no part of any appropriation contained in this title shall be used to
promulgate or carry out any instructions, order, or regulation relat- same approach is used for the child welfare services as for
ing to the care of obstetrical cases which discriminate between the child health services.
persons licensed under State law to practice obstetrics: Provided

3. Technical assistance to States and communities for
further, That the foregoing proviso shall not be so construed as to
prevent any patient from having the services of any practitioner of juvenile delinquency programs.-Consultation is given to
her own choice, paid for out of this fund, so long as State laws are States, communities and organizations, both public and
complied with: Provided further, That any State plan which pro- voluntary, on standards and methods for care and treat-
vides standards for professional obstetrical services in accordance
with the laws of the State shall be approved. (Department of

ment of juvenile delinquents, on content of State or local
Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriation Act, 1965.)

programs, and on problems of organization and coordina

tion on a statewide or local basis; assistance is given to Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

State agencies and educational institutions in planning

for training of professional and nonprofessional personnel 09-35-1556-0-1-651

actual estimate estimate in the field of juvenile delinquency.

4. Research in child life and services for children.-
Program by activities:

Studies on child health and welfare, particularly social
1. State and local health services for
children...

and economic problems are conducted and the programs

1,055 1,089 1,091 2. State and local social services for

and services for children are evaluated. The results are children.

704 804

841 interpreted to the lay and professional public through
3. Technical assistance to States and
communities for juvenile delinquency

pamphlets and bulletins.
programs.-

297 337

355 5. Information for parents and others working with 4. Research in child life and services for

children. - Publications are prepared and distributed on children...

413

543 543 child health and welfare services. Upon request, assist-
5. Information for parents and others
working with children.

ance is given to States in interpreting their child health

387 574 531 6. Mental retardation services for children.

and welfare programs.

125 743 743 7. Administration..---

407 368 406 6. Mental retardation services for children.—Policies

and guides are developed, and applications are reviewed Total program costs, funded.

3,388 4,458 4,510 Change in selected

for special maternity and infant care project grants resources

111 --60 -16 10 Total obligations.-

designed to help reduce the incidence of mental retarda3,499 4,398 4,494

tion caused by complications of child bearing; and for Financing:

research projects relating to maternal and child health 16 Comparative transfer to other accounts.

9

and crippled children's services. Consultative services 25 Unobligated balance lapsing--

268

are given to State and local agencies, both public and New obligational authority

3,776 4,398 4,494 voluntary, with emphasis on expansion of services for

mentally retarded children; program interpretive materials New obligational authority:

are prepared and distributed. 40 Appropriation 3,776 4,295 4,494

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars) 44 Proposed supplemental due to civilian pay increases..

Identification code 103 09-35-1556-0-1-651

actual estimate

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1

THE NIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN IIRRADICO

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1964

1965

1966 estimate

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Relation of obligations to expenditures:

Personnel compensation: 10 Total obligations...3,499 4,398 4,494 11.1 Permanent positions.-

2,485 70 Receipts and other offsets (items 11-17).

9

11.3
Positions other than permanent.

40
11.5 Other personnel compensation..

8
71
Obligations affecting expenditures ---

3,508 4,398 4,494
72 Obligated balance, start of year.

284 288 491

Total personnel compensation... 2,533
74 Obligated balance, end of year.
-288 -491 -991 12.0 Personnel benefits....

176
77 Adjustments in expired accounts.

21.0 Travel and transportation of persons.

280
22.0 Transportation of things---

6
90
Expenditures excluding pay increase

23.0 Rent, communications, and utilities.

62
supplemental...
3,503 4,095 3,991 24.0 Printing and reproduction..

199
91
Expenditures from civilian pay in-

25.1 Other services...

7
crease supplemental.

100
3 25.2 Services of other agencies.

58
26.0 Supplies and materials.-

29 2 Selected resources as of June 30 are as follows: Unpaid undelivered orders, 1963.

31.0 Equipment...-$25 thousand; 1964, $136 thousand; 1965. $76 thousand; 1966, $60 thousand.

38 Total costs, funded...---

3,388
The Bureau investigates and reports on the health and 94.0 Change in selected resources.

111
welfare of children and administers grants for: maternal
and child health services; crippled children's services;

99.0 Total obligations...

3,499
child welfare services; research, training, or demonstration
projects relating to child welfare, maternal and child

Personnel Summary
health, and crippled children's services; and special
projects for maternity and infant care.

Total number of permanent positions..

356 1. State and local health services for children.--Policies

Full-time equivalent of other positions..

4 and requirements for State maternal and child health and

Average number of all employees..

255 Average GS grade..

9.3 crippled children's programs are developed; State plans Average Gs salary

$9,100 are reviewed and approved; consultative services are given

3,310

233
312

6
58
428

6 56 27 22

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3,367

238
324

10
68
387

6 56 31 23

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1964 actual

1965 estimate

1966 estimate

Personnel...

2

WELFARE ADMINISTRATION-Continued projects are in operation. In 1965, about 20 special single

action demonstration programs will be started. The 1966 General and special funds-Continued

estimate includes continuing costs for 3 of the original JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND Youth OFFENSES

demonstration projects and costs for 20 special demonstra

tion programs. For grants and contracts for demonstration, evaluation, and train- 2. Grants and contracts for training of personnel.-Funds ing projects, and for technical assistance, relating to control of

are for the purpose of training personnel already employed juvenile delinquency and youth offenses, and for salaries and expenses in connection therewith, $10,000,000 [; and for a], of which

or preparing for employment in programs for the preven$3,500,000 shall be available until expended for the demonstration and

tion and control of juvenile delinquency. This training is evaluation project in the Washington metropolitan (area, $1,500,000 accomplished through university-based training centers to remain available only through June 30, 1965; as authorized by

and workshops and short-term traineeships. Over 12,500 the Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Offenses Control Act of 1961, as amended] area pursuant to section 9 of the Juvenile Delinquency personnel who work or are preparing to work in the preand Youth Offenses Control Act of 1961. (Department of Health, vention and control of juvenile delinquency were trained Education, and Welfare Appropriation Act, 1965, authorizing legisla- | by the end of calendar 1964. tion to be proposed.)

3. Technical assistance services and administration.

This activity provides for coordination of specialized Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

services in juvenile delinquency and control both at the

Federal and local levels; for project and training applicaIdentification code 09-35-0175-0-1-659

tion review and approval; collection and dissemination of

information; and direct services and technical assistance Program by activities:

to local communities and training institutions in the field. 1. Grants and contracts for demonstration

4. Washington metropolitan area demonstration and and evaluation projects.

4,000 7,000 3,600 2. Grants and contracts for training of

evaluation project.This special project was started in 2,000 2,000 2,000

1965 for the purpose of demonstrating to the Nation the 3. Technical assistance services and admin

effectiveness of a large-scale, well-rounded program for istration...-

807 1,000 900 the prevention and control of juvenile delinquency and 4. Washington metropolitan area demonstration and evaluation project...

1,500

youth offenses. The project includes among other things, 3,500

a neighborhood development center, a law enforcement and Total program costs funded 1

6,807 11,500 10,000 corrections program, and an innovative welfare program. Change in selected resources

45

It is being designed to demonstrate methods of increasing 10 Total obligations....

6,852 11,500 10,000

opportunities available to young people who are, or are

in danger of becoming, juvenile delinquents or youth Financing:

offenders, and of increasing the ability of these youth to 25 Unobligated balance lapsing.-

98

make use of these opportunities. 40 New obligational authority (appropriation) 6,950 11,500

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars) 10,000

Identification code

09-35-0175-0-1-659 Relation of obligations to expenditures: 71 Total obligations (affecting expenditures). 6,852 11,500 10,000 72 Obligated balance, start of year..

6,206 5,603

Personnel compensation:

7,603 74 Obligated balance, end of year..

-5,603

11.1 -7,603

347 Permanent positions.

331

121

-9,603 77 Adjustments in expired accounts.

11.3
11
Positions other than permanent..

53

40

40
11.4 Special personnel service payments.--

12
10

10 90 Expenditures

7,465 9,500

11.5
8,000
Other personnel compensation.

12
Total personnel compensation..

198 381 398 1 Includes capital outlay as follows: 1964, $1 thousand; 1965, $5 thousand; 1966, 12.0 Personnel benefits...

9
25

26 $0 thousand.

21.0 Travel and transportation of Selected resources as of June 30 are as follows: Unpaid undelivered orders, 1963,

55

172 persons.

172 $122 thousand; 1964, $167 thousand; 1965, $167 thousand; 1966. $167 thousand. 23.0 Rent, communications, and utilities.

8

7 24.0 Printing and reproduction...

8

60 60

25.1 Other services. This program, under Public Law 87-274, was extended

2
3

3

25.2 Services of other agencies. by Public Law 88–368 to June 30, 1966. Appropriation

231 345

566 26.0 Supplies and materials.

3 2

3 authorization expires June 30, 1965, except for sections 31.0 Equipment...

2

4 7-9 of the act. The appropriation request for 1966 is

41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions... 6,000 10,500 proposed under current legislation for which additional

99.0 Total obligations...

6,852 11,500 appropriation authorization is proposed.

i. Grants and contracts for demonstration and evaluation projects.-Funds will be used for demonstrating improved

Personnel Summary methods in the prevention and control of juvenile delinquency with emphasis placed on supporting programs of

Total number of permanent positions..

34 Full-time equivalent of other positions.

6 law enforcement and corrections, remedial services, and Average number of all employees.

18 self-help projects especially suited to the needs of young Average Gs salary

Average GS grade...

9.3 people. Eight major and five limited demonstration

$9,100

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1964 actual

1965 estimate

1966 estimate

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10,000

33

5 36 9.5

33

5 35

9.4 $9,782

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$9,893

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