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2. Operation, maintenance, and debt payment. (a) Operation. $171.4 million is required in 1966 for the operation of an estimated 378,550 family housing units (including leased units); $21.5 million is required in 1966 to lease 10,351 units in both the United States and in

foreign countries as part of the program to provide adequate family housing for eligible personnel.

(b) Maintenance of real property. The cost of maintenance and repair of the 1966 family housing inventory is estimated at $134.4 million. Minor alterations, up to $50 per unit, are funded in this subactivity.

(c) Debt payment.-A total of $161.2 million is required in 1966 to reduce the indebtedness assumed to acquire Capehart, Wherry, and surplus commodity housing and for related expenses as follows (in millions of dollars):

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(c) Construction improvements. As part of the program to provide adequate family housing for eligible personnel, $19.4 million is requested to correct deficiencies in existing 31.0 Equipment family housing facilities.

(d) Planning. Costs incurred for planning of projects which may not go forward to completion because of changing requirements are estimated at $1 million for 1966. Planning funds for projects which do go forward to completion are included in the new construction and construction improvements budget subactivities.

52.1

15.9

6.0

74.0

66.8

19.6

86.4

.8

men-owned housing at $4.9 million for a total of $8.4 million. Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

(e) Rental guarantee payments.-The last of the rental guarantee agreements entered into under the original Total number of permanent positions. authority (66 Stat. 622) expired in 1965; accordingly, no funds are required in 1966. It is not expected that rental guarantee agreements to be entered into under the new authority (77 Stat. 326) will produce housing for beneficial occupancy until 1967.

Full-time equivalent of other positions.
Average number of all employees...
Average GS grade_
Average GS salary.

Average salary of ungraded positions.

Total 119.7 35.5 6.0

Identification code 07-30-0700-0-1-051

11.1 11.3

(d) Mortgage insurance premiums.-Premium payments are required on mortgage insurance provided by the Federal Housing Administration: (1) through the Armed Services Housing Mortgage Insurance Fund on mortgages assumed by Defense to acquire Capehart and Wherry housing; and (2) on mortgages assumed by active military personnel for housing purchased under the provisions of section 124, Public Law 83-560. The premiums on Capehart housing in 1966 are estimated at $2.7 million; on Wherry housing at $0.8 million; and on service

Personnel compensation:
Permanent positions..

Positions other than permanent.
Other personnel compensation.

Total personnel compensation. 12.0 Personnel benefits.... 21.0 Travel and transportation of persons. 22.0 Transportation of things.-23.0 Rent, communications, and utilities. 24.0 Printing and reproduction... 25.1 Other services.

Contract maintenance of equipment. Indirect contract hire, foreign.. 26.0 Supplies and materials..

32.0 Lands and structures.

42.0 43.0

41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions. Insurance claims and indemnities. Interest and dividends..

99.0

Total obligations.

Man-years of employment:
Army.
Navy
161.2
Marine Corps.
Air Force...
Defense agencies..

Personnel Summary

Total....

Compensation (in thousands of dollars):
Army.
Navy.
Marine Corps
Air Force....
Defense agencies.

Total....

1964 actual

13.797 61

255

14,113

1,001 30 803 71,658

362 187,308 36 6,737

38,866

24,375

197,565 20 1,971 90,377

635,222

34,399

16,627

3,732

20,078

1,120

75,956

2,614 20 2,395 6.0 $5,929 $5,739

PERSONNEL INFORMATIONAL SCHEDULE

1965 1966 estimate estimate

SUPPLEMENTARY PERSONAL SERVICES DATA

Since the bulk of the personal services funded from the bursable part-time basis, it is not reflected in the foreFamily housing, Defense appropriation is on a reimschedule is provided to indicate the man-year equivalent going personnel summary. The following supplementary of all the personal services supported by this appropriation and the compensation paid therefor. The full-time posischedule of personnel compensation provided for this tions paid directly from this appropriation are listed in the appropriation. The positions partially supported by reimbursement from this appropriation are listed in the schedules of personnel compensation provided for each of the sponsoring Defense appropriations.

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5.701

181

15,173

5,536

3,049

706

34,182

18,122

4,070

20,909

1,115

78,398

1964 actual 1965 estimate 1966 estimate 5,767 2,903

663 5,447 185

14,965

14,284

15

222

2,508 11 2,408

2,542 4 2,430 6.1 $6,285

6.1 $6,262 $5,682 $5,704

14,521

1,030

49 977 81,813

385 178.683 40 6,800

40,821

30.904

254,715
14
2.849
86,399

700,000

5,847

3,094

699

5,983

173

15,796

36,690

18,538

4,051

22,943

1,038

83,260

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Capehart housing.
Wherry housing

Surplus commodity housing

Total.

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1964 actual 1965 estimate 1966 estimate

1,774,012
553,006
132,973

2,459,991

55,344

17,857

767

73,968

1,829,356
570,863
133,740

2,533,959

134,716

58,080

26,714

219,510

47,498

14,215

6,000

67,713

1,647,142
498,568

101,026

2,246,736

114,664

78, 139
9,380

202, 183

3,319
4,094

3,577

10,990

1,829,356 1,832,675
570,863 581,822
133,740 137,317

2,533,959 2,551,814

3,319

10,959

3,577

17,855

1,832,675 1,832,675
581,822 581,822
137,317 140,317

2,551,814 2,554,814

3,000

3,000

182,214 232,112

72,295

87,649

32,714

38,714

287,223 358,475

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SURPLUS COMMODITY FAMILY HOUSING PROGRAM The following informational schedule shows the use of foreign currencies, accrued from the sale of surplus agricultural commodities to foreign countries (68 Stat. 545), allocated to Defense to build family housing and related facilities for use by Defense personnel serving

abroad. The last allocation of foreign currencies for this purpose was made in 1961.

INFORMATIONAL FOREIGN CURRENCY SCHEDULE

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollar equivalents)

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RENTAL GUARANTEE FAMILY HOUSING PROGRAM

The following informational schedule shows the status. of the rental guarantees outstanding under agreements entered into by Defense with private sponsors of family housing built in foreign countries for rental to Defense personnel. The authority (66 Stat. 622) under which these agreements were consummated expired on June 30, 1963. As shown in the schedule, the last of these agreements terminated during 1965 (actually on September 1, 1964). Of the $3.2 million payment made in 1964 to honor guarantees which became due and payable, $2.1 million was required to terminate the agreement (due to expire on April 1, 1967) with the sponsor of 700 units in Morocco which were no longer required when the U.S. Air Force installations in that country were vacated. The bulk of the remaining $1.1 million payment in 1964 was required to meet the guaranteed rentals on the Moroccan units which became due and payable prior to the termination of the guarantee agreement. The balance of the 1964 payment and all of the 1965 payment is for guarantees on housing in France not fully occupied due to personnel redeployments.

The Military Construction Authorization Act, 1964, authorizes (77 Stat. 326) Defense to enter into new rental guarantee agreements in 1964 and 1965 for not more than 5,000 units. No such agreement may guarantee payment of more than 97% of the anticipated rentals, nor may any guarantee extend for a period exceeding 10 years, nor may the average rental on any project exceed $150 per unit per month including the cost of operation and maintenance. The following schedule does not reflect any contingent liabilities arising from the new rental guarantee program since it is not expected that any

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Identification code 07-35-0604-0-1-051

26,785

2,854

3,203

6,057

Program by activities:

Direct program:

1. Warning and detection...

2. Emergency operation.

3. Financial assistance to States..

4. Management...--

728

1 Number of units end of: 1964, 2,344; 1965 and 1966, none.

2 Guaranteed rentals, start of 1963.

Reduction of contingent liability in prior years:

CIVIL DEFENSE

Total direct obligations... -

19,641

19,641

Rentals paid by occupants..

Liability incurred and paid 3

Total reduction in prior years.

Contingent liability, start of 1964.

To honor rental guarantees on units vacated due to personnel redeployments.

728

364

364

728

1964 actual

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for carrying out civil defense activities, including the hire of motor vehicles; and financial contributions to the States for civil defense purposes, as authorized by law, [$75,000,000 $79,200,000, of which not to exceed [$16,000,000 $18,500,000 shall be available for allocation under section 205 of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, and not to exceed $14,500,000 shall be available for management expenses for civil defense including not to exceed 1,000 positions]. (50 U.S.C. App. 2251-2295; 5 U.S.C. 55(a); 50 U.S.C. App. 2257; 5 U.S.C. 78; 50 U.S.C. App. 2281(i) and 2286; 50 U.S.C. App. 2286 (d).)

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

1966 estimate

31,052

21,667
2,600

24, 267
6,785

5,899 6,300

25,721 27,250

23,735

26,950
14.485

13,930

69,285

74,985

1965 1966 estimate estimate

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43

Total obligations.....

Financing:

11 Receipts and reimbursements from: Ad-
ministrative budget accounts..

25 Unobligated balance lapsing..

New obligational authority.

New obligational authority:
40 Appropriation...
41 Transferred to-

"Operating expenses, Public Buildings
Service, GSA," (77 Stat. 436).
"Operation and maintenance, Defense
Agencies" (10 U.S.C. 126) __

Appropriation (adjusted)....

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1964 actual

93

69,378

70,319

-7

70,312

1965 1966 estimate estimate

69,378

-93

100

75,085

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100

79,300

-15

74,985

-100

75,000 79,200

75,085

-100

79,200

79,300 -100

69,285 74,985 79,200 37,978 53,263 54,248 -53,263 -54,248-58,448 -2,007

51.993 74,000 75,000

This appropriation provides for the day-to-day operation and activities of the Office of Civil Defense in carrying out the civil defense mission assigned to the Secretary of Defense by Executive Order No. 10952 in 1961 and reassigned to the Secretary of the Army on April 1, 1964. The major program costs for development and execution of a nationwide fallout shelter program are included under the Shelter, construction and research and development

account.

1. Warning and detection. This program provides for
an outdoor warning system for the Washington, DC.,
metropolitan area; fallout protection for warning points
under National Warning System; studies and surveys on
a nationwide indoor warning system to alert the popula-
tion of attack or impending natural disaster emergencies;
the procurement of instruments for detection, evaluation,
and dissemination of radiological fallout hazard data
during an emergency; and the warehousing and mainte-
nance of radiological instruments and engineering equip-
ment. In 1966, the existing outdoor warning system
for the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area will continue
to be maintained. The program initiated in 1964 of
8.000 providing fallout protection to warning points to assure
their capability for emergency operations will be con-
tinued, adding protection to 228 points for a total of 483
protected points at end 1966. Additional radiological
79,200 defense equipment to measure cumulative radiation doses

26,100
30,500
14,600

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will be procured for issuance to emergency civil defense workers at the local level. A Federal warehouse system for the receipt, storage, maintenance, and issue of radiological instruments and engineering equipment will be continued. Use of the unique competence of the Army National Guard to provide an onsite inspection, maintenance, and calibration system for radiological instruments issued to States and localities will be expanded to a total of 25 States.

2. Emergency operations.-This provides for the development of a high degree of readiness for civil defense emergency operations. This includes (a) protection of radio facilities disseminating emergency instructions and public information; (b) a damage assessment capability for preattack planning and postattack operations; (c) an education and training program stressing community and individual protective measures, shelter analysis, and protective construction; (d) development of civil defense doctrine, systems and techniques for the orderly and rapid increase of civil defense readiness of State and local governments in periods of emergencies; and (e) development of general and technical materials for use by public information media, principally at the local level. Continued emphasis will be placed in 1966 on training for shelter management and radiological monitoring to increase the effectiveness of community shelter areas located in prior years. Prototype studies of specific systems and areas were initiated in 1964 for the development of civil defense doctrine, systems, and techniques drawing together all operational concepts and requirements for supporting systems needed to realize the maximum life-saving potential of fallout shelters. During 1965 the results of these studies will be available and it is planned in 1966 to expand the scope and geographic applicability of this program in the furtherance of the civil defense readiness position throughout the nation.

3. Financial assistance to States. This activity provides financial assistance to States for procurement of survival supplies, equipment, and training; construction of protected emergency operating centers for State and local governments; and personnel and administrative expenses necessary to maintain civil defense capability at all governmental levels. Expansion of this assistance is essential to enable the States and local governments to perform the necessary planning and operations to utilize the shelter space available and to provide for additional political subdivisions entering the program.

4. Management. Provides for the administrative expenses of the Office of Civil Defense staff; i.e., salaries, travel, and supporting costs for management and administration of the national civil defense program.

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[RESEARCH, SHELTER SURVEY AND MARKING] SHELTER, CONSTRUCTION, AND RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for studies and research to develop measures and plans for civil defense [, and for]; continuing shelter surveys, [marking and] marking, stocking, [$30,200,000] and equipping surveyed spaces; and constructing and equipping Federal regional operating centers; $114,700,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That, such amounts of this appropriation as may be determined by the Secretary of Defense may be transferred, for the purposes of this appropriation, to such appropriations of the Department of Defense available for military construction as he may designate. (50 U.S.C. Appendix 2281 (d), (h); 31 U.S.C. 712(a); 10 U.S.C. 2682.)

Identification code 07-35-0605-0-1-051

General and special funds-Continued

[RESEARCH, SHELTER SURVEY AND MARKING] SHELTER, CONSTRUCTION, AND RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT-Continued

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

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CIVIL DEFENSE-Continued

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1. Shelters. The 1966 program proposes several activities oriented to increasing the national inventory of fallout shelter space. In lieu of requesting authorization and funds for obtaining fallout shelter through building modifications or new construction, emphasis is being given to reducing the long term gross requirements for such high cost shelter by several new approaches designed to exploit all the protection available in existing structures. The National Survey started in 1962 will be continued to pick up the inherent shelter space in new construction projects as they are completed and will be expanded to locate and use the available shelter in homes and other small structures not previously covered in the National Survey due to their size. Procurement of low cost,

25

25

30,225

-25

Note. Reconciliation of budget plan to obligations:
Total budget plan..

Deduct portion of budget plan to be obligated in subsequent years.
Add obligations of prior year budget plans..

30,200

99,700

15,000

114,700

25

25

114,725

-25

114,700

1964 actual

31,276

11,799

43,075

20

127

147

43,222

-127

-20

-16,115

14,289

41,250

43,222 -147

43,075

26,815 -32,553

37,338

Obligations

1965 estimate

1964 actual
41, 397

14, 289

16, 115
43, 222

Total obligations____

1 Advances and reimbursements from non-Federal sources are derived from an award made on a claim against a
carrier for damages to shelter supplies in transit (76 Stat. 522).

1965 estimate 1966 estimate 30, 225 114,725 1,489 1, 189 14, 289 1,489 43,025 115, 025

30,578

12,422

43,000

25

25

43,025

-25

-14,289

1,489

30,200

43,025

-25

43,000

32,553 -33.553

42,000

1966 estimate

100,000

15,000

115,000

25

25

115,025

-25

-1,489

1,189

114,700

115,025

-25

115,000

33,553

-114,053

34,500

in

portable ventilating kits is proposed for placement in existing shelter areas to permit their emergency use up to the full rated capacity. Architect-engineer advisory services will be expanded to exploit recent technological developments in protective design criteria which indicates that shelter can be obtained at little or no additional cost many cases by minor adaptations of designs to enhance the inherent shelter capacity before construction is initiated. These new techniques will be widely disseminated to the architecture and engineering profession to promote incorporation of shelter in everyday design work. Technical assistance will be given so that shelter concepts can be included as an integral part of the structure during the design process on new buildings. The 1966 program

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