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phase-out activities at three depots scheduled for closing in subsequent years.

3. Training support.-This provides for basic, technical, professional and flying training of individuals. Operating costs of the Air Force Reserve program are also included.

4. Operational support.-Facilities are operated and maintained to support the strategic, air defense, tactical, and transport/troop carrier missions of the Air Force. Costs cover on-the-line maintenance of aircraft and weapons, maintenance and operation of installations, missile sites, airfields and allied facilities, as well as other expenses necessary to assure and maintain operational readiness of the combat forces. This activity reflects adjustments in programs, forces, personnel, and weapon systems as well as changes in base and installation utilization. The lower funding level in 1966 is largely due to base closures and phase-out of Atlas and Titan I missiles squadrons.

This activity also finances the air defense surveillance, warning and control systems; and airlift for joint Army airborne training and mobility exercises. In addition, there are included separately identifiable funds for the Alaska Communications System which provides telegraph and long-distance telephone service in Alaska to civilians as well as to the Department of Defense and other Government activities.

Financial requirements for this appropriation have been influenced by significant force structure adjustments. The principal changes in the strategic forces in 1966 include the increased numbers of Minuteman intercontinental ballistic missile squadrons which will become operational. The estimates also reflect the final phaseout of the B-47 medium bombers and the elimination of all Atlas and Titan I missile squadrons. It is planned to continue "low-level" and airborne alert indoctrination training in the strategic bomber force.

Despite some numerical reductions in the active air defense fighter-interceptor forces in the United States, overall requirements are satisfied by closer integration of Air National Guard squadrons. One-third of the units continue to be maintained on instant alert, requiring a 75-hour workweek for combat crews, and a dispersal program is being implemented. SAGE System capabilities will continue at the current level. Improvements in the air defense area are continuing, including further upgrading of the Back-up Interceptor Control System (BUIC) which started in 1965.

Identification code

The capability of the tactical forces will continue to improve in 1966, principally as a result of nearly doubling the number of squadrons equipped with the all-purpose 07-10-3400-0-1-051 F-4C fighter aircraft.

In addition to force structure changes, other program considerations will influence the activities financed by this appropriation. Increased emphasis has been placed on the use of newly developed electronics equipment in such areas as command and control techniques and capabilities, communications, warning, weather, and intelligence. These and similar activities require contracting for many specialized services beyond the capability of Air Force personnel.

1. Aircraft fuel and oil. This program provides for aviation fuel and oil to support the operation of all Air Force and Air Force Reserve aircraft except those assigned to research and development activities, the Air National Guard, and that portion of the airlift service of the Military Air Transport Service which is financed by the Air Force industrial fund. There are several significant changes in the composition of the aircraft inventory and activity rates which result in an overall decrease in flying hours and costs from 1965 to 1966. The F-105, F/RF-4C, C-130, and T-38 aircraft will have increased usage, but this is more than offset by the flying hour decreases for the B-47, KC-97, F-84, KB-50 and various noncombat

aircraft.

2. Logistical support. This activity finances the depotlevel maintenance of materiel and operation of the Air Force supply system. 1966 estimates reflect initial

5. Medical support.-This activity finances the Air Force cost of medical care for military personnel and their families. 6. Servicewide support. This program provides for the operation of Air Force and major command headquarters, air attaché and mission offices, intelligence and security activities, and the leasing of commercial communication systems and networks.

7. Contingencies. These are extraordinary expenses approved and certified by the Secretary of the Air Force.

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

11.1 11.3 11.5

AIR FORCE

Personnel compensation:
Permanent positions...
Positions other than permanent....
Other personnel compensation..
Total personnel compensation....

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1 Average number of persons: 1964, 34,184: 1965, 30,917; 1966, 29,458

67,748

115,444

981,812 59,164

2,030 60 4,339,087 4,614,893 4,464, 144 -260 -260 -260 4,338,827 4,614,633 4,463,884

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OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, DEFENSE AGENCIES

For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance of activities and agencies of the Department of Defense (other than the military departments and the Office of Civil Defense), including administration; hire of passenger motor vehicles; welfare and recreation; awards and decorations; travel expenses, including expenses of temporary duty travel of military personnel; transportation of things (including transportation of household effects of civilian employees); industrial mobilization; care of the dead; dissemination of scientific information; administration of patents, trademarks, and copyrights; tuition and fees incident to the training of military personnel at civilian institutions; repair of facilities; departmental salaries; procurement of services, special clothing, supplies, and equipment; field printing plants; information and educational services for the Armed Forces; com

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71

72

74

77

90

Total direct obligations.....

Reimbursable program: 1. Supply operations.. 2. Field operations.. 4. Management. -

Total reimbursable obligations.............

Total obligations....

11

14

25 Unobligated balance lapsing.

Financing:

Receipts and reimbursements from:
Administrative budget accounts..
Non-Federal sources 1.

New obligational authority: 40 Appropriation......... 41 Transferred to

New obligational authority.

42 Transferred (10 U.S.C. 126) from"Operation and maintenance, Army”. "Operation and maintenance, Navy". "Operation and maintenance, Air Force""Operation and maintenance, Civil Defense".

Appropriation (adjusted) ....

"Operating expenses, Federal Supply Service," General Services Administration (5 U.S.C. 630e). "Operating expenses, Public Buildings Service," General Services Administration (77 Stat. 436 and 78 Stat. 655)... "Operating expenses, Transportation and Communications Service," General Services Administration (5 U.S.C. 630e)...

Obligations affecting expenditures..

1964

actual

Obligated balance, start of year. Obligated balance, end of year. Adjustments in expired accounts.

Expenditures...

253,477 190,409

639

25,808

470,333

25,152 203,670 284

229,106

699,439

446,000

-2,134

-8

-100

15.545 4.342 15,177

19 estin

-218,710-241.1 -10,396

8,489

478,822

478,822

263 222

31

517

35. 213

1. 250.

768,

-8,

517,9

511,6

Relation of obligations to expenditures:

10 Total obligations..

699,439 768,1

70 Receipts and other offsets (items 11-17)-229,106-250,1

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470,333 517,9 38,061 34.6 -34,661 -32.6 -1,524

472,209 520.0

1 Reimbursements from non-Federal sources are principally from U.S. Government property to finance expenses in connection the appropriation act); sale of goods and services to individuals, incl services and surcharges on commissary sales (10 U.S.C. 2205, 10 annual appropriation act); charges for unofficial telephone service and revenues from private carriers for use of Department of Defe cars (10 U.S.C. 2667).

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This appropriation finances the immediate Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and agencies of the Department of Defense which operate directly under the control of the Secretary of Defense.

1. Supply operations.-This activity covers the Defense Supply Agency, which provides common supply and service support to military activities in the continental United States. The agency manages inventories of $1.6 billion for eight material categories: fuel, food, clothing, medical, general, industrial, construction and electronics supplies. The Agency also manages the Department of Defenseowned idle industrial plant equipment inventory, valued at $1 billion, to secure greater utilization of this equipment. The Agency performs central procurement of $3.1 billion per year. The Agency operates a distribution system for items in the eight material categories, including eight supply depots, and operates the Defense Logistics Services Center, including the Surplus Bidders Control Office, the Surplus Sales Offices, and the Traffic Management Service. The Agency is also responsible for the administration and supervision of the Department of Defense coordinated procurement programs, the Federal catalog program, the defense materiel utilization program and the defense surplus property disposal program.

Obligations increase in 1966 because provision has been made for management improvement programs, including (1) the engineering data retrieval system which will permit the rapid retrieval and interchange of engineering data between the Department of Defense and industrial activities engaged in research and production engineering; (2) revision of Federal item identification guides which will result in significant reductions in the number of new items entering the Federal catalog system, reduction in new procurement, and increased utilization of inventory; (3) further consolidation of the inactive industrial equipment storage facilities which will permit greater utilization of this equipment and (4) provision for the Defense Supply Agency's share of rapid voice and digital

communications.

2. Field operations.-This program activity includes the funds required for the support of the Armed Forces Information and Education activities of the Department of Defense; the Defense Communications Agency; the Defense Atomic Support Agency; the Defense Intelligence Agency and classified activities.

4. Management. This covers the civilian salaries and other necessary expenses of the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Joint Chiefs of Staff Organization.

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

Identification code 07-10-0100-0-1-051

Personnel compensation:

11.1 Permanent positions...
Positions other than permanent..
Other personnel compensation..

11.3

11.5

Total personnel compensation.............

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1964
1965
1966
actual estimate estimate

220,560
1,002
5,185

272,211 275,322 1,435 1,480 4,704 4,763 226,747 278,350 281,565

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Total number of permanent positions...
Full-time equivalent of other positions.
Average number of all employees.
Average GS grade..

Average GS salary

Average salary of ungraded positions..

1964 actual

209,676
15,669

8,460

1,636

30,259

4,780

167,297

23,328

9,206
22

470,333

229,106

699,439

36,485 207 32,466

7.5 $7,195 $5,764

1965 1966 estimate estimate

249,617

250,802
18,569 18,521

10,579

10,820

1,574

3,105

40,961

6,956

33,951

5,654

167,054

25,000

4,775

517,958

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD AND
RESERVE

For expenses of training, organizing, and administering the Army

National Guard and the Army Reserve, including maintenance,

3. Interdepartmental activities.-Provision is made for the Department of Defense participation in and support of various interdepartmental activities, including the President's Committee on Equal Employment Oppor- sions of law (32 U.S.C. 709), and those necessary to provide reimtunity, the Missile Sites Labor Commission and several classified activities.

operation, and repairs to structures and facilities; hire of passenger motor vehicles; personal services, including those in the National Guard Bureau and services of personnel of the National Guard employed as civilians without regard to their military rank, and the number of caretakers authorized to be employed under provi

bursable services for the military departments, may be such as is deemed necessary by the Secretary of the Army; travel expenses (other than mileage), as authorized by law for Army personnel on active duty, for Army National Guard division, regimental, and battalion commanders while inspecting units in compliance with National Guard regulations when specifically authorized by the Chief, National Guard Bureau; supplying and equipping the Army National Guard of the several States, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia and the Army Reserve, as authorized by law; expenses for the Reserve Officers' Training Corps and other units at educational institutions; and expenses of repair, modification, maintenance, and issue of supplies and equipment (including aircraft); [$188,000,000] $292,000,000, of which not less than [$1,900,000] $5,000,000 shall be available only for the maintenance of real property facilities: Provided, That obligations may be incurred under this appropriation without regard to section 107 of title 32, United States Code. (5 U.S.C. 43, 78; 10 U.S.C. 261-280, 2231-2238, 2511, 4381-4387, 4651; 32 U.S.C. 701, 702, 709; Department of Defense Appropriation Act, 1965.)

1,278

434

17,071 27,548 31.948 2,042 2,377 1,335 17 2,170 489 2.267 2,162 57

59 2,827

683 203.939 2.723 92

1,071 3 2,363 510 214,355 2,252 53

250,197

768,155

39,588 288 37,242 7.5 $7,632 $5,750

172,424

27,718

3,640

533,762

42,822

576,584

39.346 291 37,395 7.6 $7,708 $5.750

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OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR NATIONAL GUard

For operation and maintenance of the Air National Guard, including medical and hospital treatment and related expenses: maintenance, operation, repair, and other necessary expenses of facilities for the training and administration of the Air National Guard, including repair of facilities, maintenance, operation and modification of aircraft; transportation of things; hire of passenger motor vehicles; supplies, materials, and equipment, as authorized by law for the Air National Guard of the several States, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia; and expenses incident to the maintenance and use of supplies, materials, and equipment, including such as may be furnished from stocks under the control of agencies of the Department of Defense: travel expenses (other than mileage) on the same basis as authorized by law for Air National Guard personnel on active Federal duty, of Air National Guard commanders while inspecting units in compliance with National Guard regulations when specifically authorized by the Chief, National Guard Bureau: [$236,000,000] $238.000,000, of which not less than [$1,700,000 $2,500,000 shall be available only for the maintenance of real property facilities: Provided, That the number of caretakers authorized to be employed under the provisions of law (32 U.S.C. 709) may be such as is deemed necessary by the Secretary of the Air Force and such caretakers may be employed without regard to their military rank as members of the Air National Guard: Provided further, That obligations may be incurred under this appropriation without regard to section 107 of title 32, United States Code. (5 U.S.C. 43, 78; 10 U.S.C. 2231-38, 2511; 32 U.S.C. 107, 320, 701-14; Department of Defense Appropriation Act, 1965.)

10

43 44

Identification code 07-10-3840-0-1-051

71

72

74

77

30,056 6.6 6.2 90 $6,060 $5.792 $6,538 $6,644

91

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

1964 actual

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11 14

25 Unobligated balance lapsing..

New obligational authority

Total obligations........

New obligational authority: 40 Appropriation.

41

Financing:

Receipts and reimbursements from: Administrative budget accounts.. Non-Federal sources 1

Transfer to "Emergency fund, Defense,' (77 Stat. 270)..

Relation of obligations to expenditures: 10 Total obligations....

70 Receipts and other offsets (items 11-17).......

Appropriation (adjusted).

Proposed supplemental due to civilian pay increases..

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Federally recognized units.. Number of installations..

Identification code 07-10-3840-0-1-051

668

220,278

45,354 47,584 49,389

31,070

33,638

142,014
1,037

155,597
598

37,700 150,178 598

135

135

135

219,609

237,552

238,000

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-628 -41

491

222,700

-2,600

220,100

220,278

-668

219,609

26,940

222,635

687
135

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

220,100 237,552 238,000

1965 1966 estimate estimate

1,200

238,752

-1,160 -40

1964 actual

-22,225 -25,777 -1,690

102,721 4,033

1,964

2,623

451

238,752 -1,200

236,000 238,000

237,552

22,225

1 Reimbursements from non-Federal sources derived from utilities and services furnished to private contractors.

842

238,842

236,000 238,000

1,552

This appropriation provides for all operation and maintenance costs of the Air National Guard as a Reserve component of the Air Force. This includes funds for the operation of Air National Guard installations, including unit equipment and the pay of 15,986 State civilian employees. Some significant elements of the program are summarized in the following table:

-800 -42

1963

1965

1964 1966 actual actual planned proposed 720 765 138

138

238,842

-842

765

138

238,000

25,777

-33,777

232,498 229,950 1,502 50

1965 1966 estimate estimate

107,954 110,515 4,503

4,229

2,086

2,437

3,369

2,979

483

494

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