The Natural History of Rabies, Volume 1

Front Cover
Elsevier, Dec 2, 2012 - Science - 620 pages

The Natural History of Rabies, Volume I explores the fundamental aspects of the rabies virus, including its growth, latency, morphology, chemistry, physical characteristics, and relationships with other viruses. It looks at the virus' in vivo pathogenesis and pathology, from entrance to transmission in the central nervous system (CNS) and subsequent exit. It also reviews current diagnostic methods including those used for antibody titration and for determination of virus presence.

Organized into three sections encompassing 21 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the history of rabies as well as its morphology and morphogenesis. It then discusses the virus' antigenic composition and relationships, hemagglutinin and the optimal conditions for its preparation and demonstration, advantages and disadvantages of the passive hemagglutination test, methods for concentration and purification of the virus, and growth in cell culture. It explains the virus' pathogenesis to and spread within and from the CNS, electron microscopy of CNS and extraneural rabies infection, lipotropism in rabies virus infection, use of exogenous and endogenous interferon to inhibit rabies virus infection, mouse inoculation and Negri body diagnosis, and fluorescent antibody test in rabies. The book concludes with an assessment of the serum neutralization, indirect fluorescent antibody, and rapid fluorescent focus inhibition tests.

This book is a valuable resource for virologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and students.

 

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Contents

Chapter 1 History of Rabies
1
The Virus
31
Pathogenesis and Pathology
153
Diagnosis
371

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