The adventures of the caliph Haroun Alraschid, recounted by the author of 'Mary Powell'.

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Page 296 - It ends with musical melancholy, a strain of exquisitely simple beauty, referring to the judicial slaying of one of England's worthiest sons. There are some fine portraits ably limned herein. There are family pictures so graphically described that they possess the mind for ever."— Church and State Gazette.
Page 296 - This is a charming little book; and whether we regard its subject, cleverness, or delicacy of sentiment and expression — to say nothing of its type and orthography — it is likely to be a most acceptable present to young or old, be their peculiar taste for religion, morals, poetry, history, or romance.
Page 296 - ... nothing of its type and orthography — it is likely to be a most acceptable present to young or old, be their peculiar taste for religion, morals, poetry, history, or romance." — Christian Observer. " Unquestionably the production of an able hand, and a refined mind. We recommend it to all who love pure, healthy, literary fare...
Page 296 - Clever and agreeable reading. . . . We can give the book unqualified praise for the pleasant, and tolerably accurate, pictures which it affords of the domestic manners of the period; and the characters of some of the personages represented are drawn with distinctness, and with the features of nature.
Page 128 - O possessors of wealth ! everything that is round is not a nut ; nor is everything long, a banana ; nor is everything that is red, meat; nor is everything white, fat; nor is everything that is ruddy, wine; nor is everything tawny, a date...
Page 60 - She received the fullers' earth, and he carried away the pot of bran. I returned laden with as much hemp as I could carry, followed by five porters laden as I was...
Page 202 - ... ground before him, each of them addressing him as Prince of the Faithful. And he was delighted at this, and returned their salutation ; after which he called the...
Page 84 - ... any. In searching about in the neighbourhood, one of my slaves found a jar of bran in a shop ; he bought the bran, and brought it in the jar, promising to carry it back the next day. The slave emptied the bran into the manger, and in spreading it about, that the .horses might each have their share, he felt under his hand a piece of linen tied up, which was very heavy ; he brought me the linen without having touched it, in the state he found it, and presenting it to me said, that perhaps it was...
Page 290 - Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away : Blefled be the Name of the Lord.
Page 34 - Each of them assumed the habit of a foreign merchant, and in this disguise they went unattended through a private door of the palace garden, which opened into the country. They took a turn on the outside of the town, quite to the banks of the river, at some distance from the gate, without noticing any irregularity. They...

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