Silver Fields: And Other Sketches of a Farmer-sportsman

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Houghton Mifflin, 1921 - Natural history - 261 pages
 

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Page 19 - My hounds are bred out of the Spartan kind, So flew"d, so sanded; and their heads are hung With ears that sweep away the morning dew ; Crook-kneed and dew-lapp'd like Thessalian bulls ; Slow in pursuit, but match'd in mouth like bells, Each under each.
Page 94 - Iroquois war-party, on their way to Canada, were near at hand; and they soon approached their camp, on a small island near the southern end of Lake Champlain. The warriors, two hundred in number, saluted their victorious countrymen with volleys from their guns ; then, armed with clubs and thorny sticks, ranged themselves in two lines, between which the captives were compelled to pass up the side of a rocky hill. On the way, they were beaten with such fury, that Jogues, who was last in the line, fell...
Page 136 - A Spanish writer complains in a memoir addressed to his king, that " the corps of junadines (the proprietors of flocks) enjoy an enormous power, and have not only engrossed all the pastures of the kingdom, but have made cultivators abandon their most fertile lands ; thus they have banished the estantes, ruined agriculture, and depopulated the country.
Page 12 - ... leads up declivities to be surmounted only by the stanchest and most active hounds, and through thick forests and almost impassable swamps. In New England the hunt is for the red fox and his varieties, the silver and cross foxes, the gray fox of the south and west being almost, if not quite, unknown. From the tip of his nose to the root of his tail, the red fox measures about twenty-eight or thirty inches, his tail sixteen to eighteen inches including hair, and his height at the shoulder thirteen...
Page 21 - They career about, sounding bugle-notes that wake the echoes for a mile around. Reynard at the woodedge, homeward bound from his mousing or poultry stealing, is warned that this is to be no holiday for him. Very likely the hounds are too eager for the hunt to eat their morning Johnny-cake; if so, let them have their way, — they will gobble it ravenously enough to-night, if they have the chance. And now, away ! across the frosty fields toward yonder low hill which we dignify with the name of mountain....
Page 80 - The needle's eye that doth supply The thread that runs so true ; Many a beau have I let go Because I wanted you.
Page 35 - ... and fields, still green under October skies, or sees them brown and sere through the dim November haze, or spread white and far with December snows. The truest sportsman is not a mere skillful butcher, who is quite unsatisfied if he returns from the chase without blood upon his garments, but he who bears home from field and forest something better than game and peltry and the triumph of a slayer, and who counts the day not lost nor ill spent though he can show no trophy of his skill. The beautiful...
Page 136 - ... not less than ninety yards wide, as well as commons for the feeding of these flocks — a grievous burden to the husbandman, and for which there was little or no redress. A French writer says: "It was seldom that proprietors of land made demands when they sustained damage, thinking it better to suffer than to contest, when they were assured that the expense would greatly exceed any compensation they might recover.
Page 15 - FAMILY. coldest winter night. Shelter from rain or snow-storms he undoubtedly will take, for he is not overfond of being bedraggled, though it is certain he will sometimes take to the water and cross a stream without being driven to it. Reynard goes wooing in February, and travels far and wide in search of sweethearts, toying with every vixen he meets, but faithful to none, for his love is more fleeting than the tracks he leaves in the drifting snow. In April, the vixen having set her house in order...
Page 34 - ... hour in the compass of two or three acres. Glare ice holds scent scarcely more than water. This, no one knows better than the fox, and you may be sure he will now profit by this knowledge if naked ice can be found. He will also run in the paths of the hare, pick his way carefully along rocky ridges, swept bare of snow by the wind, leaving no visible trace of his passage, and, at times, take to traveled highways. If the snow is deep and light so that he sinks into it, he will soon, through fatigue...

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