Thoughts of a Philosophical Fighter Pilot

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Hoover Press, Sep 1, 2013 - Biography & Autobiography - 242 pages
Thoughts on issues of character, leadership, integrity, personal and public virtue, and ethics, the selections in this volume converge around the central theme of how man can rise with dignity to prevail in the face of adversity—lessons just as valid for the challenges of present-day life as they were for the author's Vietnam experience.

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Nothing but respect

User Review  - mwmichelsen - Overstock.com

Every American should respect Adm. Stockdale. These reflections show the way to a more meaningful life. Read full review

Contents

I
7
II
8
III
9
IV
13
V
28
VI
30
VII
44
VIII
48
XVIII
127
XIX
133
XX
138
XXI
144
XXII
149
XXIII
150
XXIV
155
XXV
169

IX
57
X
64
XII
74
XIII
84
XIV
89
XV
101
XVI
111
XVII
119
XXVI
177
XXVII
185
XXX
202
XXXI
210
XXXII
222
XXXIII
238
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Page 46 - I returned and saw under the sun that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.
Page 231 - If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?
Page 37 - Because thou hast asked this thing, and hast not asked for thyself long life, neither hast asked riches for thyself, nor hast asked the life of thine enemies, but hast asked for thyself understanding to discern...
Page 42 - If it be so, our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace, and he will deliver us out of thine hand, O king. But if not, be it known unto thee, O king, that we will not serve thy gods, nor worship the golden image which thou hast set up.
Page 215 - Remember that you are an actor in a drama of such sort as the author chooses, — if short, then in a short one ; if long, then in a long one. If it be his pleasure that you should enact a poor man, see that you act it well ; or a cripple, or a ruler, or a private citizen. For this is your business, to act well the given part; but to choose it, belongs to another.
Page 193 - If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information nor take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades.
Page 37 - Give, therefore, thy servant an understanding heart to judge thy people, that I may discern between good and bad: for who is able to judge this thy so great a people ?' And the speech pleased the Lord, that Solomon had asked this thing.
Page 42 - If we are thrown into the blazing furnace , the God we serve is able to save us from it, and he will rescue us from your hand, O king. '"But even if he does not, we want you to know, O king, that we will not serve your gods or worship the image of gold you have set up.
Page 209 - A man that is born falls into a dream like a man who falls into the sea. If he tries to climb out into the air as inexperienced people endeavour to do, he drowns — nicht wahr?

About the author (2013)

Vice Admiral James Stockdale, a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution, served in the navy from 1947 to 1979, beginning as a test pilot and instructor at Patuxent River, Maryland, and spending two years as a graduate student at Stanford University. He became a fighter pilot and was shot down on his second combat tour over North Vietnam, becoming a prisoner of war for eight years, four in solitary confinement. The highest-ranking naval officer held during the Vietnam War, he was tortured fifteen times and put in leg irons for two years. His books include Thoughts of a Philosophical Fighter Pilot (1995, Hoover Institution Press) and In Love and War (second revised and updated edition, 1990, U.S. Naval Institute Press), coauthored with his wife, Sybil. In early 1987, a dramatic presentation of In Love and War was viewed by more than 45 million viewers on NBC television.

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