Locke: A Biography

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 8, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 528 pages
2 Reviews
This is the first comprehensive biography in half a century of John Locke -“a man of versatile mind, fitted for whatever you shall undertake”, as one of his many good friends very aptly described him. Against an exciting historical background of the English Civil War, religious intolerance and bigotry, anti-Government struggles and plots, and the Glorious Revolution of 1688, Roger Woolhouse interweaves the events of Locke's rather varied life with detailed expositions of his developing ideas in medicine, theory of knowledge, philosophy of science, political philosophy, philosophy of religion, and economics. Chronologically systematic in its coverage, this volume offers an account and explanation of Locke's ideas and their reception, while entering at large into the details of his private life of intimate friendships and warm companionship, and of the increasingly visible public life into which, despite himself, he was drawn - Oxford tutor, associate of Shaftesbury, dutiful civil servant. Based on broad research and many years' study of Locke's philosophy, this will be the authoritative biography for years to come of this truly versatile man whose long-standing desire was for quiet residence in his Oxford college engaged in the study and practise of medicine and natural philosophy, yet who, after years in political exile, finally became an over-worked but influential public servant and who is seen now as one of the most significant early modern philosophers. Roger Woolhouse is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of York. He is the author of many journal articles and books on early modern philosophy, including The Empiricists, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and, with R.Francks, Leibniz's “New System”.
 

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User Review  - carl.rollyson - LibraryThing

Book Review Locke: A Biography by Roger Woolhouse The English philosopher John Locke (1632-1704) left behind not only "An Essay Concerning Human Understanding" (1690) but also his laundry lists and ... Read full review

Locke: a biography

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English philosopher John Locke's theories of human nature and knowledge have deeply influenced political theory, as well as our notions about education and civil liberties, most crucially providing ... Read full review

Contents

QUIET AND SETTLEMENT62
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impositions even when we think them unjust is no imposition
52
I desire I may be considered only as a transcriber
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A week for a pair of gloves was not out
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was not entirely under his own control and that somehow
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another offer in the diplomatic service He cannot have been
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3
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this way in which they could have been together was
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6
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was that Lockes having lived inoffensively in the college was
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fresh information sent from Holland information which changed
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after Wood recorded that Locke was expelled from Christ Church
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which has so kindly been arranged for me and which
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WHAT GOD HAS THOUGHT FIT75
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be asked Promisekeeping is certainly a great and undeniable rule
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for salvation there should be peace and friendship between them
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WITH MY LORD ASHLEY AS
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subversive had any right to toleration he thought that in
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Later in the year Locke more than doubled the size
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memory of some few effects produced by visible and external
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themselves and oftentimes give them views entirely new which sometimes
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to bear the fatigue those must undergo who would bring
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During the summer Locke worked on a manuscript he headed
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I must conclude my carcass to be made of a
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collaboratively by people acting in concert to carry out a
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4
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MONTPELLIER
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Converse with books however despite its reputation of being so
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Locke was not prepared just to bow passively to this
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the relation that the world will think I had to
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demonstration that it is wrong to think there is always
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the Navarre Locke wrote in his journal that the happiness
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again in Paris or London But for Toinard at least
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5
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When he left Oxford for London in midApril he was
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1641
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TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT
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Locke did not deny that these questions could be settled
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Though this doctrine of a power in the people obviously
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Mr Locke sat by as a spectator for some time
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7
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and reunited it was soon revealed to be a decaying
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who pretends to be a great judge of books that
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misrule unless there really were misrule our complaints were
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removed the unclarity by adding the words which others call
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8
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I flatter myself that I am so sincere a lover
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past year Recently indeed as he told Locke he had
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DISCOURSE ON MATTERS OF
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left much the same except for an increase in penalties
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Pawling as a Treasury official offered to help him get
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9
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Perhaps his displeasure led him to continue by offering his
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of these I shall count no discredit if Mr Edwards
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them to apply them your principles in that manner is
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of political prudence some remarks to Molyneux reveal more personal
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way to promote religion or defend its articles Locke taunted
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10
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on their basis Jesuss message stands firm
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who lent a collier some money to be repaid when
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AT THE END OF MY DAY WHEN MY
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itself and then all the papers put up in a
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About the author (2007)

Roger Woolhouse is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of York. He is the author of many journal articles and books on early modern philosophy, including The Empiricists, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and, with R. Francks, Leibniz's 'New System'.

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