The Microscope and Its Revelations

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John Churchill and Sons, 1868 - Microscopes - 794 pages
 

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Contents

Arrangement of Prism c in Powell and Lealands Binocular for high powers
88
Drawtube with Erector
90
Diagram of Nachets Erecting Prism
91
SorbyBrowning Spectroscope Eyepiece
92
Arrangement of Prisms in ditto
93
Jacksons Eyepiece Micrometer
96
Hartnacks Eyepiece Micrometer
97
Microscope arranged for Drawing
99
Diagram of Chevaliers Camera Lucida
101
Diagram of Nachets Camera Lucida
102
Brookes Nosepiece modified by Powell and Lealand
103
Collinss Graduating Diaphragm
107
Rosss Achromatic Condenser
108
Powell and Lealands ditto
109
Webster Condenser fitted with Collinss Graduating Diaphragm
111
Amicis Prism
113
DrawTube 89 BlackGround Illuminators
114
Parabolic Illuminator
115
Diagram of action of ditto
116
Whitecloud Illuminator
117
Fitting of Polarizing Prism
118
Fitting of Analyzing Prism
119
Spectroscope Eyepiece 92 Side Illuminators for Opaque
120
Condensing Lens 1 21
121
Bullseye Condenser
122
Becks Parabolic Speculum
123
Diagram of Lieberkūhn
125
Camera Lucida 98 Stage Forceps and Disk
127
Becks Diskholder
128
Morriss Objectholder
129
Aquatic Box
130
ZoophyteTrough
131
Achromatic Condenser 107 Compressorium
133
Rosss Compressorium
134
Dipping Tubes
135
Glass Syringe
136
Forceps
137
BockettLamp
141
Section of Adjusting Objective
150
Support 138 Arrangement for Opaque
152
Arrangement of Microscope for Transparent Objects
154
Arrangement of Microscope for Opaque Objects
161
Hexagonal Areolation of Pleurosigma angulatum after Wenham
167
Valve of Surirella yemuna after Hartnack
182
CHAPTER
185
SpringScissors
187
SectionInstrument
190
Grinding and Polishing of Glass Slides
201
Lever of Contact
203
Warnishes and Cements
204
SpringClip
208
9s Wooden Slide for Opaque Objects
209
Mounting Objects in Canada
211
Smiths Mounting Instrument
213
SliderForceps
214
SpringPress
215
Preservative Media
220
DroppingBottle
224
ThinGlass Cells
226
Sunk Cells w 105 PlateGlass Cells
227
Ide TubeCells
228
Builtup Cells
231
Iris Poteor globator after Ehrenberg
251
xxvi
255
It║ Formation of Amoeboid bodies in Volvor after Hicks
256
Various species of Staurastrum after Ralfs
259
Circulation in Closterium after S G Osborne
261
Binary Subdivision of Micrasterias after Lobb
264
Conjugation of Cosmarium after Ralfs
266
Ditto of Closterium after Ralfs
267
Binary Subdivision and Conjugation of Didymoprium after Ralfs
268
Development of Pediastrum granulatum after Braun
271
Various forms of Pediastrum after Ralfs
272
Portion of Isthmia nervosa after Smith 27s 119 Tricerati║n favus after Smith
279
Plearosigma quadratum after R Beck
281
Biddulphia pulcheila after Smith 122 Conjugation of Epithemia after Thwaites 123 Conjugation of Melosira after Thwaites
286
Meridion circulare after Smith 125 Bacittaria paradoza after Smith
290
Licnophora flabellata after Smith
291
Diatoma vulgare after Smith 127
292
Surirella constricta after Smith
294
Campylodiscus costatus after Smith
295
Meiosira subſterilis after Smith
296
Actinoptychus undulatus after Smith
299
Isthmia nervosa after Smith
301
Chartoceros Wighamii after T West
303
Rhizosolenia imbricata after Brightwell
304
Gomphonema geminatum after Smith
305
Separate frustules of ditto after Smith
306
Schizomena Grevillii after Smith
307
Mastogloia Smithii after Smith
309
Fossil DiatomaceŠ from Oran after Ehrenberg
312
Fossil Diatomaceae from Mourne mountains after Ehrenbe
313
Haematococcus sanguineus after Hassall 3 18
319
343
320
Zoospores of Ulva after Thuret
321
Oscillatoria conterta after DAlquen
323
Nostoe after Hassall
324
Generation of Waucheria after Pringsheim
327
Confervaceae
330
Zoospores of Achlya after Unger
331
Sexual Reproduction of GEdogonum ciliatum after Pringsheim
334
Zygnema quinimum after Kutzing
335
Chartophora elegans after Thuret
336
Batrachospermun moniliforme
337
Characeae
338
Nitella ſterilis after Slack
339
Antheridia of Chara after Thuret
341
Receptacle of Fucus after Thuret 846
347
Stysanus caputmedusae after Payer
360
Puccinia wraminis
362
Acidium tussilaginis after Payer 175 Clavaria crispula after Payer
364
273
367
Fructification of Marchantia after Payer 177 Stomata of Marchantia after Mirbel 178 Conceptacles of Marchantia after Mirbel
368
Archegonia of Marchantia after Payer
369
180 Elater and Spores of Marchantia after Payer
370
Portion of Leaf of Sphagnum 871
374
Ditto of Bryum ditto
375
Ditto of Cinclidium ditto 875
376
Sori of Polypodium after Payer
377
Ditto of Haemion it is ditto 878
378
Development of Prothalium of Pteris after Suminski
379
Antheridia and antherozoids of Pteris after Suminski 88 1
381
281
383
Spores of Equisetum after Payer
384
CHAPTER VIII
386
Section of leaf of Agave after Hartig
387
Section of Aralia ricepaper
388
Stellate Parenchyma of Rush
389
Development of leafcells of Anacharis after Wenham
390
Circulation in hairs of Tradescantia after Slack
394
290
395
Testa of StarAnise
396
Spiral cells of Oncidium 897
397
294
401
Cells of Parony filled with Starch 898
402
Vascular tissue of Italian Reed after Schleiden
404
Transverse section of stem of Palm
406
le Ditto of Wanghie Cane
407
Ditto of Hazel
410
Ditto of Fossil Conifer
411
21s Ditto of Mahogany
412
Transverse section of Aristolochia ?
414
22d Ditto of Burdock
415
CHAPTER IX
417
Cuticle of Yucca
418
Ditto of Rochea Ditto
419
Wertical Section of Leaf of Rochea after Brongniart
420
Cuticle of Iris Ditto
421
Vertical Section of Leaf of Iris Ditto
422
Longitudinal Section of ditto Ditto
423
Cuticle of Petal of Geranium
425
Pollengrains of Althaea c
428
320
429
Seeds of Poppy c
433
Gromia oriformis after Schulze
439
Actinophrys sol after Claparede
440
25
442
235
445
Gregarina from Earthworm after Lieberkūhn
448
336
449
Sphaerozoum orodinare after Haeckel
450
Kerona silurus and Paramecium caudatum after MilneEdwards
453
Group of Vorticellor after Ehrenberg
454
Fissiparous Multiplication of Chilodon after Ehrenberg
458
Encysting process in Vorticella after Stein
459
Metamorphosis of Trichoda after Haime
461
Brachionus pala after MilneEdwards
470
Rotifer valgaris after Ehrenberg
471
Manducatory apparatus of Euchlanis defleza after Gosse
473
Stephanoceros Eichornii after Ehrenberg
478
Noteus quadricornis after Ehrenberg
480
TABLE OF CONtENTs
482
Rotalia ornata after Schulze
484
369
486
376
492
Disk of Simple type of Orbitolites
494
Portion of animal of Complex type of Orbitolites
496
383
500
Internal casts of Textularia and Rotalia after Ehrenberg
502
Tinoporus baculatus
503
Nummulinida
506
800
508
Horizontal Section of Nummulina
512
Internal cast of Orbitoides Fortisii
524
Astron║ma Aristotelis Ditto
528
CHAPTER XI
533
417
540
Acalephae
543
Medusabuds of Syncoryna after Sars
545
424
547
Hydrozoa 537 Anthozoa
550
Cydippe and Beroe after MilneEdwards
551
Calcareous reticulation of Spine of Echinus
557
434
562
Structure of Tooth of Echinus after Salter
564
Structure of Skeleton 555 EchinodermLarvae
568
442
570
CHAPTER XIII
576
446
577
Tunicata
584
CHAPTER XIV
593
305
594
Shells of Mollusca 593 Organs of Sense of Mollusks
618
Entozoa 621 Annelida
624
CHAPTER XVI
636
Suctoria
645
Structure of Integument 654 Stings and Ovipositors 682
664
Circulation of the Blood 671 Acarida
687
Curved Scissors 188
717
Elementary Tissues 689 Epidermis
718
Valentins Knife
724
Birdshead processes of Cellularia and Bugula
746
CHAPTER XIX
751
APPLICATIon of THE MICROSCOPE TO GEOLOGY
765
Mineral Objects 768 Organic Structures suitable
774

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 290 - is not avoided but pushed aside ; or, if it be sufficient to avert the onward course of the frustule, the latter is detained for a time equal to that which it would have occupied in its forward projection, and then retires from the impediment as if it had accomplished its full course.
Page 294 - Point, the bottoms of which are literally covered in the first warm days of spring with a ferruginous-coloured mucous matter, about a quarter of an inch thick, which, on examination by the microscope, proves to be filled with millions and millions of these exquisitely beautiful siliceous bodies. Every submerged stone, twig, and spear of grass, is enveloped by them ; and the waving plume-like appearance of a filamentous body covered in this manner, is often extremely elegant.
Page 671 - in which the honey is obtained when the organ is plunged into it at the bottom of a flower, is by
Page 768 - The result of this gentleman's researches * proves that granites have solidified at a heat far below the fusing points of their constituent minerals, and at such a pressure as to enable it to entangle and retain a small amount (ú to •ú per cent.) of aqueous vapour, which naturally must have been present during its liquefaction.
Page 46 - It is certainly a matter of surprise that opticians, especially on the Continent, should have so long neglected the very simple means which are at present commonly employed in this country of giving an inclined position to microscopes, since it is now universally acknowledged that the vertical position is, of all that can be adopted, the very worst.
Page 356 - Fungus spreads by the extension of its own minute stems and branches ; and also by the production of minute germs, which are taken up by the circulating blood, and carried to distant parts of the body. The disease invariably occasions the death of the Silk-worm ; but it seldom shows itself externally until afterwards, when it rapidly shoots forth from beneath the skin.
Page 141 - ... of the numerical, instead of opposing and counteracting this tendency, add to it increased strength, in consequence of the violent party struggles incident to them, as has been fully explained. And hence their encroachments on liberty and the danger to which it is exposed under such governments. So great, indeed, is the difference between the two in this ^respect that liberty is little more than a name under all governments of the absolute form, including that of the numerical "majority, and...
Page 531 - ... gradually tapering towards either end to a fine point ; the whole bundle coiled like a strand of rope into a lengthened spiral, the threads of the middle and lower portions remaining compactly coiled by a permanent twist of the individual threads ; the upper portions of the coil frayed out, so that the glassy threads stand separate from one another, like the bristles of a glittering brush ; the lower extremity of the coil imbedded perpendicularly in the middle of a hemispherical or conical undoubted...
Page 600 - The greater the dip of these laminae, the closer will their edges be ; whilst the less the angle which they make with the surface, the wider will be the interval between the lines. When the section passes for any distance in the plane of a lamina, no lines will present themselves on that space. And thus the appearance of a section of nacre is such, as to have been aptly compared by Sir J. Herschel to the surface of a smoothed deal board, in which the woody layers are cut perpendicularly to their...
Page 720 - Passing outwards, we find the cells more completely formed ; at first nearly spherical in shape ; but becoming polygonal where they are flattened one against another.

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