Transactions of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science

Front Cover
The volume for 1886 is a report of the proceedings of the "Conference on temperance legislation, London, 1886."

From inside the book

Contents

Summary of Proceedings
198
Discussion on Tenant Right Claim in Ireland
223
Upper and Middle Class Education
231
Discussion on the Law of Master and Servant
243
Public Elementary Education
249
Educational Results and the Mode of Testing them J G FITCH
258
The Future of Popular Education HORACE MANN
267
Education of Pauper Children
278
The Education of Pauper Girls MARY CARPENTER
286
Adult Education
293
Art Education
301
Miscellaneous
309
Proposals for Teaching Agriculture Scientifically in Common Schools
320
Suggestions for the Improvement of Classical Discipline PROFESSOR
328
On the Institution of Academical Degrees in the Science of Education
334
Discussions on Public Elementary Education 342
342
Discussion on the Education of Pauper Children
348
International Education M BARBIER
354
On the Operation in Ireland of the Penal Servitude Act of 1857
372
Convict Discipline in Ireland REV JOHN T Burt
379
On the Difference between the English and Irish Convict Systems
395
Explanations showing the Difficulties which would attend the Introduc
402
Discussion on TicketsofLeave
410
Present State of the Question concerning the Reformation of Prison
414
Prison Discipline SIR JOSHUA JEBB K C B
425
A Visit to the Female Convict Prison at Mountjoy Dublin ANNE
437
On the Essential Principles of the Reformatory Movement MARY
443
Notes on Sec 3 of 20 21 Vict cap 55
450
Summary of certain Objections to the Proposed Permissive Bill of
458
97
463
146
472
112
483
Street Occupations J R FOWLER 487
495
Police Supervision over Convicts Discharged in England and Ireland
502
The AntiSocial Influences of the Traffic in Alcoholic Drinks
527
119
536
The Necessity of Reformatory Discipline in County and Local Prisons
537
125
542
Hospitals
617
Hospital Dietetics JOHN CHARLES STEELE M D
627
Statement of the Appropriation of the Nightingale Fund SIR JOSHUA
641
Abuses Attaching to the Administration of London Hospitals W
647
The Work of the Metropolitan Medical Officers of Healththeir Suc
657
Summary of Proceedings
666
Discussion on the Health of the Army Navy and Merchant Service
675
On the Sale of Poisons and the Prevention of Accidental Poisoning
679
On the Qualification and Duties of an Officer of Health HENRY
685
Employers and Employed
693
The Strike of the Stonemasons in London 18611862 FREDERIC
710
Building Trade Disputes in Scotland 18611862 H G REID
722
Report on the Cooperative Movement in Germany PROFESSOR HUBER
735
Condition of the Working Classes
744
On the Sanitary Instruction of the Labouring Classes and their
750
183
754
The Poor Laws
757
Taxation
763
Measures taken by Employers for Promoting Habits of Prudence
774
The Official Employment of Women in Works of Charity Rev J
780
The Social Economy of a Working Mens College R B LITCHFIELD
787
Summary of Proceedings
793
The Liverpool Cooperative Provident Association J WILSON
801
An Account of some New Trades in Birmingham and Phases of
826
Our Monetary Laws their Evils and the Remedies HAMER
833
199
844
A concise Account of the Colony of South Australia compiled from
857
International
866
Gold as a Commodity and as Money and the influence of its fixed
879
British Guiana S W H HOLMES
891
504
907
Discussion on Taxation
908
On Private Bill Legislation MARK WHITWILL
910
813
914
884
915
223
917
555
920

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Page 100 - For there are in nature certain fountains of justice, whence all civil laws are derived but as streams : and like as waters do take tinctures and tastes from the soils through which they run, so do civil laws vary according to the regions and governments where they are planted, though they proceed from the same fountains.
Page 183 - In most civilized countries, acting under a sense of the force of sacred obligations, it has had the sanctions of religion superadded: it then becomes a religious, as well as a natural, and civil contract ; for it is a great mistake to suppose that, because it is the one, therefore it may not likewise be the other.
Page 111 - Law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world : all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 111 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure of working, the same we term a Law.
Page 163 - The Egyptian granite was beautifully encrusted with the precious green marble of Numidia; the perpetual stream of hot water was poured into the capacious basins through so many wide mouths of bright and massy silver; and the meanest Roman could purchase, with a small copper coin, the daily enjoyment of a scene of pomp and luxury which might excite the envy of the kings of Asia.
Page 172 - ... according to the usages of the said society and of the said persons respectively ; and every such marriage is hereby declared and confirmed good in law, provided that the parties to such marriage be both of the said society, or both persons professing the Jewish religion respectively, provided also, that notice to the registrar shall have been given, and the registrar's certificate shall have issued in manner hereinafter provided.
Page 339 - Calcutta for the purpose of ascertaining, by means of examination, the persons who have acquired proficiency in different branches of literature, science, and art, and of rewarding them by academical degrees as evidence of their respective attainments, and marks of honour proportioned thereunto...
Page 164 - The character itself should be, to the individual, a paramount end, simply because the existence of this ideal nobleness of character, or of a near approach to it, in any abundance, would go further than all things else towards making human life happy; both in the comparatively humble sense, of pleasure and freedom from pain, and in the higher meaning, of rendering life, not what it now is almost universally, puerile and insignificant — but such as human beings with highly developed faculties can...
Page 160 - Science, therefore, following one cause to its various effects, while art traces one effect to its multiplied and diversified causes and conditions; there is need of a set of intermediate scientific truths, derived from the higher generalities of science, and destined to serve as the generalia or first principles of the various arts.
Page 163 - From these stately palaces issued a swarm of dirty and ragged plebeians, without shoes and without a mantle; who loitered away whole days in the street or Forum to hear news and to hold disputes; who dissipated in extravagant gaming the miserable pittance of their wives and children; and spent the hours of the night in obscure taverns and brothels in the indulgence of gross and vulgar sensuality.

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