The Scold's Bridle: A Novel

Front Cover
Macmillan, Oct 15, 1995 - Fiction - 384 pages
Few tears fall when rich, spiteful old Mathilda Gillespie's bloody corpse is found her bathtub, her wrists slit and the ancient scold's bridle clamped on her head. It seems Mathilda's favorite heirloom was also an instrument of torture form the Middle Ages, an iron cage used to gag yapping women. Among the Dorset villagers, only Sarah Blakeney, Mathilda's doctor for her final year, seems even mildly disturbed that the miserable nag has been muzzled forever.

But suicide starts to look like homicide, and Sarah's sorrow seems a bit contrived when the bombshell drops that Mathilda has disinherited her daughter and granddaughter, leaving her entire fortune to Sarah. Now the object of vicious gossip and the police's prime suspect in a brutal murder, Sarah must prove her innocence by delving into Mathilda's past to unmask the real killer.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lucybrown - LibraryThing

Riveting, but uncomfortable reading. I think the malicious & sadistic psychology is perhaps overdone and bordering on unbelievable, just as the doctor's goodness reeks of incredibility. Fascinating ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lucybrown - LibraryThing

Riveting, but uncomfortable reading. I think the malicious & sadistic psychology is perhaps overdone and bordering on unbelievable, just as the doctor's goodness reeks of incredibility. Fascinating ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
17
Section 3
33
Section 4
51
Section 5
69
Section 6
87
Section 7
105
Section 8
139
Section 11
195
Section 12
213
Section 13
231
Section 14
253
Section 15
269
Section 16
289
Section 17
331
Section 18
353

Section 9
157
Section 10
177
Section 19
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Minette Walters lives in Hampshire, England, with her husband and two children. Formerly a magazine editor, she is now a full-time writer. Her novel The Ice House was awarded Britain's John Creasey Award for Best First Crime Novel of the year. In her spare time, the author renovates houses and volunteers as a prison visitor.

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