Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

COMMERCE, AGRICULTURE, MANUFACTURES, INTERNAL
IMPROVEMENTS, EDUCATION, POLITICAL ECON-

OMY, GENERAL LITERATURE, ETC.

"Commerce is king."

EDITED BY

J. D. B. DE BOW,

PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL ECONOMY, ETC., IN THE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA

VOL. XXII.-THIRD SERIES, VOL. II.

WASHINGTON CITY

AND

NEW ORLEANS.

18 57.

359.

Our SOUTHERN NEIGHBORS—Vera Cruz-by Frederick Doring, of Mexico, p. 1•
LA SALLE AND THE Mississippi, by the Editor, p. 13.
STATISTICS AND GEOGRAPHY OF Iron, by A. S. Ilewitt, before the Historical Stat-

istical Society of New York, p. 44.
The University of Virginia, by A. Roane, Esq., of Washington city, D. C., p. 62.
THE CONSTITUTION OF MAN AND SLAVERY, by W. S. Grayson, of Mississippi, p. 74.
THE RELATIVE POLITICAL STATUS OF THE NORTII AND SOUTH, by Python, p. 113.
THEORY OF POLITICAL INDIVIDUALISM, by Geo. Frederick Holmes, of Va., p. 133.
DR. DEWEY AND His Elm Tree Oration, a Review, by W. J. Grayson, of South

Carolina, p. 149. RELIGIOUS INTOLERATION, by R. M. Johnson, of Georgia, p. 166. THE RELATIVE MORAL AND SOCIAL STATUS OF THE NORTH AND SOUTH, (concluded)

by Python, p. 225. CAPITAL AND LABOR—The laws of wealth, etc., by George Frederick Holmes, of

Virginia, p. 249. CONNECTION BETWEEN AMERICAN SLAVERY AND THE British COTTON MANUFACTURE,

by I. T. Danson, of England, p. 265. Our ISLAND NEIGHBORS-Sandwich Islands, climate, population, Government,

productions, reciprocity treaty with the United States, by Dr. Wood, of Hon

olulu, S. I., p. 288. Early PHYSICIANS OF THE SOUTH, by Dr. E. D. Fenner, of New Orleans, p. 299. THE SOUTHERN States, No. 2-Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, by J. G. Kohl,

of the Coast Survey, p. 302. The CONSERVATIVE PRINCIPLE, or Social Evils AND THEIR REMEDIES, by George

Fitzhugh, of Virginia, p. 419. The Southern States, No. 3— The State of Mississippi, by J. G. Kohl, Esq., p. REVOLUTION IN THE Cotton INDUSTRY-Mr. Henry's Enterprise, p. 387. COOLIES--CUBS AND EMANCIPATION, by Hon. T. L. Clingman, of N. C., p. 414. Tobacco TRAĐE OF BALTIMORE AND OF THE Union, by Charles De Ford, of Balti

more, p. 372. STEAMSHIPS AT THE SOUTH, by William C. Barney, p. 410. THE SLAVE TRADE, by George Fitzhugh, of Virginia, p. 449. THE AMERICAN L'viov, by Charles W. G. Smith, of Ohio, p. 479. The LABORER-IIis Rights AND DUTIES, by Dr. D. Lee, Agricultural Professor in

the University of Georgia, p. 486. A POETICAL DIGRESSION--Poems of James Barron Ilope, p. 521. CANNIBALS ALL; or, SLAVES WITHOUT MASTERS, by the Editor, p. 543. AGRICULTURAL FEATURES OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, by Edward Ruffin,

of Virginia, p. 462. MANAGEMENT OF A SOUTHERN PLANTATION--Rules enforced on the Rice Estate of

P. C. Weston, Esq., of South Carolina, p. 38. Prospects of SOUTHERN AGRICULTURE, by George D. F. Jamison, of South Caro

lina, p. 180. CONNECTION OF Our ATLANTIC AND Pacific SHORES– The several proposed Isthmus

Connections, by Captain Cram, U. S. Ariny, p. 365. SUPPLY AND CONSUMPTION OF COTTON-PRESENT AND PROSPECTIVE, by John M.

Cordoza, of Charleston, South Carolina, p. 337. AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATIONS AND UNIVERSITIEs, by Philip St. George Cocke, of

Virginia, p. 495. The Power Of Cortos, by D. 1). Deming, of New York, p. 5-10. LETTERS FROM LIEUTENANT M. F. MAURY AND JOSEPH SEGAR, ON A LINE OF STEAMERS

FROM THIE ('USAPEAKE TO Eurore, p. 513. ONE OF THE Evils OF THE TIMES, by MIDDLE PASSAGE-SUFFERINGS OF FREE AND SLAVE IMMIGRANTS, by Geo. Fitz

hugh, of Virginia, p. 571. CONSEQUENCES OF ABOLITION AGITATION, by Edmund Ruffin, of Va., No. I, p. 5$3. PRIVATEERS AND PRIVATEERING, p. 593.

NORTH AND THE SOUTH, by Elwood Fisher p. 623. · WAR UPON SOCIETY-Socialisy-by Geo. Fitzhugh, p. 633. FREE TRADE AND DIRECT Taxes, by the Editor, p. 645.

; p. 562.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Abolition Agitation, consequences of, 583. Direct Taxation and Trade, 307, 645.
African Slave Trade-its history and mode of Direct Taxes, history of, 653.
conduct, 579. (See Slave Trade.)

Disunion, effects North and South, 583.
Animal Food, high price of, 213.

Dred Scott in the Supreme Court, 404.
Agricultural Associations and Universities, 495.
Agricultural Features of Virginia and North East India Commerce, its value to the world,
Carolina, 462.

604.
Agriculture of the South-Its prospects, 180. Education in Charleston-The College, 505;
Agriculture-Weight of a bushel of produce, Education Statistics North and South, 517.
520.

Emigration, horrors of, 570.
Atlantic and Pacific, connection of, 365. Evils of the Times, 561.
Artesian Wells in Texas and New Mexico, 438.
Alabama, 305.

Free Trade, 809, 555.

Free Trade and Direct Taxation, 8S4, 645,
Banks of the United States, 532.

Free Society--Its Tendencies--The New Dis-
Book Notices, 112, 392, 445, 519, 562.

organizing School of Andrews, 183,
Baltimore Tobacco Trade, 872.

Florida, 303.

es, 547.

Cotton Industry, revolution in, 887.

Georgia, 802.
Cotton--Sole reliance upon slave labor, 265, Greai Britain-Her Dependence on American
Rules and Statistics, 286.

Cottons, and the maintenance of Southern
Cotton-Present growth and future supply, 197. Slavery, 265—Miseries of her Working Class-
Cotton Statistics of the United States, 211, 592.
Cotton Spinning on the Plantation, 327, 337.
Cotion-Supply and consumption present and Honduras Route to Pacific, 367.
prospective, 338.

Hope's Poems, 521.
Cotton in California, 214.
Cotton-Its power in the world, 540.

Immigrants, sufferings of, 570.
Commerce of the United States, Exports, Im- Indirect Trade of the United States, 358.

ports, &c., 204,532, Revenues, Expenditures, Iron for Railroads made or imported into the
684, ports, 535; Exports, manufactured and United States, 519.
anmanufactured, 537.

Iron-Statistics and Geography of its Produc-
Commeree of the Indies, struggles for, 604. tions, Prices, Furnaces, Cost of Manufacture,
Commercial Progress of the United States- Production in the United States, Iron Furna-

Imports, Exports of the Union, and of each ces of the United States, p. 44.
port and State, Tonnage, Ship Building, In-
direct trade, &c., 349.

Laborer-His Rights and Duties, 456.
Commercial Statistics for 1856, 325.

Labor and Capital, 249.
Charleston and the Western trade, 443.

La Salle and the Mississippi, 13.
Charleston College, its history and graduates,
505.

Middle Passage of Africans, 577.
Conservative Principles; or, Social Diseases Mississippi, 339.
and their Remedies, 419, 449.

Mississippi River-Its Discovery, and the Early
Coolie Trade, 414,

Explorers, 13.
Coinage of the United States, 537.

Manufactures at the South-Lonisiana Cotton
Cuba and Emancipation, 414.

Factory, Mobile Cotton Factory, Mobile Pa-
Capital and Labor, 249.

per Mill, 110.
Convention of Southern States at Savannah, Mormons and their Doings, 492.

S1, 216, 307,
Cannibals All; or, Slaves without Masters, 542. North and South, Morality of Public Life in,
Census of the United States--Its Curiosities, 491; Education Statistics, 517.
215.

New Orleans and French Steamers, 318.
Catholic Church, 567.

Naval Establishment of the World, 601.

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »